Overview

The continuing encroachment of human settlements into fire-prone areas and extreme fire seasons in recent years make it urgent that we better understand both the physical and human dimensions of managing the risk from wildfire. Wildfire Risk follows from our awareness that increasing public knowledge about wildfire hazard does not necessarily lead to appropriate risk reduction behavior. Drawing heavily upon health and risk communication, and risk modeling, the authors advance our understanding of how individuals ...
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Wildfire Risk: Human Perceptions and Management Implications

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Overview

The continuing encroachment of human settlements into fire-prone areas and extreme fire seasons in recent years make it urgent that we better understand both the physical and human dimensions of managing the risk from wildfire. Wildfire Risk follows from our awareness that increasing public knowledge about wildfire hazard does not necessarily lead to appropriate risk reduction behavior. Drawing heavily upon health and risk communication, and risk modeling, the authors advance our understanding of how individuals and communities respond to wildfire hazard. They present results of original research on the social, economic, and psychological factors in responses to risk, discuss how outreach and education can influence behavior, and consider differences among ethnic/racial groups and between genders with regard to values, views, and attitudes about wildfire risk. They explore the role of public participation in risk assessment and mitigation, as well as in planning for evacuation and recovery after fire. Wildfire Risk concludes with a dedicated section on risk-modeling, with perspectives from decision sciences, geography, operations research, psychology, experimental economics, and other social sciences.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'The authors advance our understanding of risk analysis by digging deeper into notions of vulnerability, issue framing, and tradeoff decisionmaking about the benefits of risk reduction. This book will have important policy and budgetary implications for how we approach wildfire risk response.'
Sam Burns, Fort Lewis College

'Fills important gaps in our knowledge about social and economic dimensions of wildfire risk. It provides a "crash course" in the social science methods available to learn about individual and community perception and response to wildfire risk.'
John Loomis, Colorado State University

'Provides both practical perspectives and scholarly contributions...A valuable resource for anyone involved in wildfire management, including land planners, resource managers, fire protection personnel, policymakers, researchers, and students.'
Bonita McFarlane, Canadian Forest Service

'An excellent overview of research about the social, cultural, and economic dimensions of wildfire and their implications for public and private management of the "wildland-urban interface" and its risks.'
Tony Prato, University of Missouri

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781136523885
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 9/30/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 324
  • File size: 6 MB

Meet the Author

Wade E. Martin is a professor of economics at California State University, Long Beach, and is editor of the journal Contemporary Economic Policy.

Carol Raish is a research social scientist at the USDA Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Research Station Albuquerque Lab.

Brian Kent is project leader in Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis at the Rocky Mountain
Research Station.

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Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     vii
Contributors     ix
Introduction   Hanna J. Cortner     1
Community Perspectives     7
Understanding Public Perspectives of Wildfire Risk   Sarah McCaffrey     11
Wildland-Urban Interface Residents' Views on Risk and Attribution   Patricia J. Cohn   Daniel R. Williams   Matthew S. Carroll     23
Collaborative Planning to Reduce Risk   Victoria Sturtevant   Pamela Jakes     44
Addressing the Mitigation Paradox at the Community Level   Toddi A. Steelman     64
Integrative Healing: The Importance of Community Collaboration in Postfire Recovery and Prefire Planning   Michele R. Burns   Jonathan G. Taylor   John T. Hogan     81
Individual Perspectives     99
Managing Individual Response: Lessons from Public Health Risk Behavioral Research   Terry C. Daniel     103
Making the Decision to Mitigate Risk   Ingrid M. Martin   Holly Wise Bender   Carol Raish     117
The Effects of Risk Perception and Adaptation on Health and Safety Interventions   Donald G. MacGregor   Melissa Finucane   Armando Gonzalez-Caban     142
Diversity in Southwesterners' Viewsof Forest Service Fire Management   Patricia L. Winter   George T. Cvetkovich     156
Risk-Modeling Perspectives     171
Improving Management Decisions   Joseph Arvai   Robin Gregory   Melissa Zaksek     173
Integrating Science and Community into Decision Support   Barbara J. Morehouse   Barron J. Orr     194
Managing Risk with Chance-Constrained Programming   Michael Bevers   Brian Kent     212
Using Economic Experiments in Evaluating Mitigation Decisions   Robert P. Berrens   Michael McKee   John Talberth   Michael Jones     226
Valuing the Health Effects of a Prescribed Fire   Wade E. Martin   Victor Brajer   Karl Zeller     244
Epilogue   Hanna J. Cortner     263
References     267
Index     299
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