Wildflower Bride (Montana Marriages Series #3) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Welcome to the wilds of Montana, where humor, romance, and suspense ride the range. Glowing Sun, a white woman raised by the Flathead tribe, has vague memories of her former life, including a name—Abby Lind. When she’s forced to sever all links with her adopted Shoshone family, Abby wonders if she’ll ever find a home again. Tenderhearted Wade Sawyer, responsible for Abby’s survival during the village massacre, convinces the knife-wielding woman to return with him to the Sawyer Ranch, never realizing danger lurks ...

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Wildflower Bride (Montana Marriages Series #3)

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Overview

Welcome to the wilds of Montana, where humor, romance, and suspense ride the range. Glowing Sun, a white woman raised by the Flathead tribe, has vague memories of her former life, including a name—Abby Lind. When she’s forced to sever all links with her adopted Shoshone family, Abby wonders if she’ll ever find a home again. Tenderhearted Wade Sawyer, responsible for Abby’s survival during the village massacre, convinces the knife-wielding woman to return with him to the Sawyer Ranch, never realizing danger lurks behind every corner. Can they survive long enough to fall in love?

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Editorial Reviews

Once Upon a Romance
Wildflower Bride is a tender story of two wounded souls who learn that if you trust and believe God can heal. Every story Ive read of Mary Connealys is full of independent yet sensitive characters that are portrayed with human qualities that I can relate to and Wildflower Bride is no exception. Ms Connealy has a way of writing that will make the reader feel all the emotions her characters are feeling. Add a sprinkle of humor and mix with inspiration to make her writing a favorite.


Trudy

Author's Choice Reviews
Old West mixes with romance, humor and faith in a happily-ever-after mix that leaves pleasant memories and a smile on the face. Abby is my kind of heroine. Hope to see her and Wade in further adventures. Faith element: medium to high.

— Carolyn Schiedies

Novel Reviews
Wildflower Bride is a book filled with cantankerous characters and dangerous situations, yet Mary Connealy is able to lasso these wild situations with God’s mercy and grace, and the outcome is truly entertaining! I’ve read several of Mary’s stories at this point, and Wildflower Bride brings out what I love most in her writing. Wildflower Bride is a jewel in Mary Connealy’s writing crown, and I highly recommend it to you! Jump in and hang on! It’s a wild ride!

— Kim Ford

Coffee Time Romance & More
This is an exciting and fun read. Great characters who show their flaws, yet try to make themselves better. Ms. Connealy has written a book that captures the old west, romance, and faith, and entices you to sample the other books in this series.
Matilda
Author's Choice Reviews - Carolyn Schiedies

Old West mixes with romance, humor and faith in a happily-ever-after mix that leaves pleasant memories and a smile on the face. Abby is my kind of heroine. Hope to see her and Wade in further adventures. Faith element: medium to high.

Coffee Time Romance & More - Matilda

This is an exciting and fun read. Great characters who show their flaws, yet try to make themselves better. Ms. Connealy has written a book that captures the old west, romance, and faith, and entices you to sample the other books in this series.

Novel Reviews - Kim Ford

Wildflower Bride is a book filled with cantankerous characters and dangerous situations, yet Mary Connealy is able to lasso these wild situations with God’s mercy and grace, and the outcome is truly entertaining! I’ve read several of Mary’s stories at this point, and Wildflower Bride brings out what I love most in her writing. Wildflower Bride is a jewel in Mary Connealy’s writing crown, and I highly recommend it to you! Jump in and hang on! It’s a wild ride!
Once Upon a Romance - Trudy

Wildflower Bride is a tender story of two wounded souls who learn that if you trust and believe God can heal. Every story Ive read of Mary Connealys is full of independent yet sensitive characters that are portrayed with human qualities that I can relate to and Wildflower Bride is no exception. Ms Connealy has a way of writing that will make the reader feel all the emotions her characters are feeling. Add a sprinkle of humor and mix with inspiration to make her writing a favorite.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781607421580
  • Publisher: Barbour Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/1/2010
  • Series: Montana Marriages Series, #3
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 85,539
  • File size: 803 KB

Meet the Author

Mary Connealy writes romantic comedy with cowboys. She is a Carol Award winner, and a Rita, Christy, and Inspirational Reader’s Choice finalist. She is the bestselling author of the Wild at Heart series, which recently began with book 1, Tried & True. She is also the author of the Trouble in Texas series, Kincaid Bride series, Lassoed in Texas trilogy, Montana Marriages trilogy, Sophie’s Daughters trilogy, and many other books. Mary is married to a Nebraska rancher and has four grown daughters and a little bevy of spectacular grandchildren. Find Mary online at www.maryconnealy.com.
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Read an Excerpt

Wildflower Bride


By Mary Connealy

Barbour Publishing, Inc.

Copyright © 2010 Mary Connealy
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-60742-159-7


CHAPTER 1

Montana Territory, 1877


Gunfire jerked Wade Sawyer awake.

His feet hit the floor before he made a conscious decision to move. Grabbing his rifle mounted over the door, he rammed his back to the wall, jacked a shell into the chamber, and listened.

Another shot fired, then another. The volley went on and on. Many guns blazing.

Even as he figured that out, he realized the gunfire wasn't close. Wade yanked the shack's door open. In the heavy woods and the dim light of approaching dawn, there wasn't much to see, but he knew the ruckus wasn't aimed at him. It had another target, and from the direction of the sound, he knew what ... or rather who.

Glowing Sun. And her village.

Already dressed because he slept in his clothes, he yanked his boots on. Snagging his heavily lined buckskin coat off the peg on the wall, he dashed toward his horse, yanking the jacket on while he ran.

Living in a meadow Wade had penned off, his chestnut gelding had his head up, alerted by the shooting, staring toward the noise. Wade lassoed the horse and had leather slapped onto the animal within two minutes. Wade swung up and slid his rifle into the boot of the saddle. Letting loose a yell that'd make a rebel soldier proud, Wade kicked his horse and charged toward death.

The shots kept ringing, echoing from the Flathead village set in the meadow high on the mountaintop.

His horse was game, and terror goaded Wade to risk the treacherous trails at a breakneck pace.

But it was too far. Racing up a deer trail, he knew, no matter how fast he rode and how much he risked, he'd be too late. He was already too late when the shooting started.

The hail of bullets ended. Wade galloped on. The weapons falling silent only made Wade surer that whatever damage was being done was over. In the gray of dawn, that silence ate at him, interrupted only by his horse's thundering hoofbeats. He reached the base of the rise surrounding the Flathead village and tore up the mountainside.

A horse skylined itself, a masked rider atop it. A struggling woman thrown over his lap, screaming, clawing, kicking. A blond woman dressed in Indian garb, her hair catching the rising sun. Screaming as only Glowing Sun could scream.

She was still alive. Wade felt a wash of relief mixed with rage and terror as he goaded his horse forward. He could rescue her. Save her. He was in time.

Wade closed the distance, his horse blowing hard as it galloped up the rugged hillside, hooves thundering. Still a long upward quarter of a mile away, Wade wasn't close enough yet to open fire. Afraid he'd hit Glowing Sun, Wade drew his rifle and carefully fired over the man's head.

At the instant he pulled the trigger, three masked riders topped the hill, riding at full speed.

Wade's bullet slammed the first one backward. The man shouted. His horse reared. A splash of bright red bloomed on the man's shirt. Grabbing at the saddle horn, the outlaw showed great skill by keeping his seat. But he lost control of his mount and plowed into the horse bearing Glowing Sun and her abductor.

Shocked and sickened to have shot a man, Wade grimly raced on toward Glowing Sun.

The masked man just behind the one Wade had wounded swung his gun at Wade in a way that struck Wade as awkward or somehow wrong. The shooter hesitated; then, without firing a shot, he abandoned the fight, whirled, and raced his horse back the way he'd come.

The third man, skinny, but beyond that unrecognizable behind his kerchief, turned to face Wade's gunfire. The instant he saw Wade, he turned coyote like the other outlaw and ran, leaving behind his wounded friend and the man who had Glowing Sun.

Cowards.

Glowing Sun gave an impossible twist of her body and an earsplitting shriek. She kicked herself over backward, landing a bare foot in the man's face.

He must have yanked on the reins, because the horse reared, neighing and fighting the bit, skidding and spinning. As the horse threatened to go over backward, the man threw himself to the ground.

Glowing Sun went with him, screaming but not with fear or pain. It sounded like fury, killing-mean rage. And it sounded strong. Wade prayed she hadn't been hurt.

Wade, still galloping full ahead up the long slope, leveled his rifle one-handedly and fired again, even higher this time.

The man Wade had shot gained control of his horse, wheeled, and dashed after the other bandits.

The fallen man leapt to his feet, still holding on to Glowing Sun. Then Wade realized the masked man wasn't holding her ... he was fighting her off.

Shouting Flathead words Wade didn't understand, she had one hand jammed into the man's throat as she slashed with her knife.

With the sharp smack of his backhand on Glowing Sun's face, the man broke her grip. Her blade slashed, catching a flare of light from the first beams of the rising sun, cutting the man across his arm and chest. The outlaw yowled in pain.

Staggering back, Glowing Sun screamed an Indian battle cry and dove at him. She caught his kerchief and pulled it down. Then her fingers slipped. She fell and slid down the steep hillside on her back.

Wade fired again, his horse thundering forward.

Stay alive. Stay alive.

He'd be there in seconds. But one bullet, one slash of a blade could rob the world—and Wade—of Glowing Sun's courage and beauty and indomitable spirit.

The outlaw jerked his gun free and shot at Wade. There was no blast. The gun jammed or was empty. Wade thought of the volley of gunfire that had awakened him and suspected the man had emptied his gun already.

Fury twisting his face, the man, his mask dangling around his neck, gave Wade one wild look. Wade saw his face plainly. Blood poured over his thick black beard and down the front of his heavy sheepskin coat. The outlaw snatched up his horse's reins and threw himself into the saddle, and in two leaping strides, his horse vanished over the rim, following the other outlaws into the Flathead valley.

Wade reined hard as he reached Glowing Sun. His horse nearly sat down as it slid to a stop. Wade swung to the ground and raced to Glowing Sun's side.

Blood soaked the front of her dress, coated her hands. She jumped to her feet as he got there.

"Where are you hurt?" Frantic, Wade tried to force her onto the ground.

She fought to stay on her feet and slashed the knife.

He knew her well enough to duck. "It's me! Glowing Sun, it's Wade. Let me help you!" He knew what he must look like. He hadn't shaved all winter or cut his hair. Or bathed for that matter. He had no business expecting her to recognize the wild man he'd become.

She froze. Her knife was raised to strike. Her eyes locked on his face. "Wade?" The rage switched to relief. The knife fell from her fingers and she launched herself into Wade's arms.

He staggered down the hill a few feet as he caught her hard against his chest.

Dear God, dear God, thank You. She's alive. Holding her feels like a taste of heaven. Thank You. Thank You.

Wade's head cleared from the knee-weakening relief. "Where are you bleeding? Were you shot? Did those men hurt you?" She felt vital and strong in his arms, not like a wounded woman should. His hands went to her shoulders, to push her back so he could see where she'd been hurt.

Before he could accomplish that, the smell hit him. Wade whirled with her still in his arms. Her feet flew out as she swung from his neck. He carried her as he dashed to the crest of the rise to see ...

Devastation.

Smoke and bodies.

The tepees in flames.

Glowing Sun's village laid to waste, people sprawled everywhere. A dozen, maybe two dozen, all still. As death.

Gasping in horror, Wade looked at the village.

He'd made a habit of riding up here through the winter. This was the summer hunting grounds for Glowing Sun's people, and he'd watched and waited for her to return from her village's winter camp. He knew, even as he'd done it, the behavior was too much like what he'd done to Cassie Dawson a few years ago. But he couldn't seem to help it. He'd needed to see Glowing Sun.

As spring had come on, he'd been more careful. Ghosting his way to the rim to study the high mountain valley to see if the Flatheads had returned. Only a week ago he'd ridden up here to find they'd come back. He'd dropped behind a scrub pine and watched until he caught a glimpse of her, alive and well and as beautiful as a dream. Then he'd slunk away like a low-down coyote.

Now, movement caught his eye. The men who'd taken Glowing Sun galloped far across the shallow bowl where this small group of Flatheads, roaming far from their reservation home, spent their summers. Wade's hand clutched at his gun, but he was too far away for a shot.

A shot. He'd shot a man. His stomach churned. He fought nausea.

A wail of torment from Glowing Sun stopped him from dropping to his knees and emptying his stomach. He wanted to get on his horse and run from what he'd done. But he couldn't leave Glowing Sun with this devastation.

A flash of Glowing Sun fighting for her life ran vividly through his mind. What choice did he have but to fight for her? But it left him heartsick.

Then he looked again at the smoldering ruins of the peaceful village. Men, women, children. Killed by those four men. They'd come with rifles and handguns. The Indians were, more often than not, unarmed, at least unarmed beyond knives and spears. The Flatheads were a peaceful people. Their meager weapons were nothing against heavily armed men with repeating rifles.

Wade should be proud he'd shot one of those murdering scum. He should want to kill them all. The shame of that thought made his stomach twist again, and he thought he might vomit. He knew being able to kill wasn't the sign of a man. He'd grown enough in his faith to understand that, but his common sense was fighting a battle with his upbringing.

"Why did this happen?" Wade asked God aloud.

Glowing Sun answered. "A massacre." She still clung to him, but she'd lifted her head and turned to look at the butchery. She'd spoken in Wade's language. He'd taught her English, or rather helped her rediscover her first tongue.

Wade blocked her view of the nightmare by turning and putting his body between her and the destruction. Thinking of her distracted him from his nausea.

Before he could check her for injuries, a cry of pain rose from the village nearly half a mile away in the valley.

Whirling to follow the sound, his weak stomach forgotten, he released Glowing Sun and grabbed at his horse's reins. He jumped on, held his hand out to her. Her hand slapped into his with a sharp clap. He swung her up in front of him, remembering how she'd liked to ride.

They raced down the hill and waded into a bloodbath.

Glowing Sun snagged the reins away and swung her leg over the horse's head. She jumped to the ground before the chestnut stopped and raced toward the loudest cries of pain.

Wade followed, relieved to see her moving and unhurt despite the blood.

Glowing Sun dropped to her knees. "Mama!"

Wade's stomach twisted with dread as he saw two gunshot wounds bleeding from the woman's chest. The woman opened her eyes, but they seemed unfocused. She grabbed at Glowing Sun as if fighting her off, screaming.

"No, Mama. Let us help you."

The older woman kept screaming, fighting.

"Flathead, Glowing Sun. Speak Flathead to her."

Glowing Sun looked up, confused.

"You're speaking English." Wade pulled off his coat then tore off his shirt and grabbed his knife out of its sheath in his boot.

Glowing Sun shook her head then turned back to the woman.

"Ten ... Mama ... Ten."

Ten? Did that mean "mother"? Wade should have learned the language of the tribes around him. Why had he never tried? His father hated the idea. Indians were to be driven off, not treated as neighbors.

Glowing Sun spoke in the guttural tribal language.

The injured woman calmed and seemed to recognize Glowing Sun. Instead of screaming, she began a chant.

"We've got to get the bleeding stopped." Wade dropped beside Glowing Sun. The chances of saving Glowing Sun's mother were slim, but they had to try. With a loud tearing sound, Wade's shirt split under his blade. Wade handed strips to Glowing Sun, who pressed them against the gushing wounds.

Glowing Sun began to pray in English, frantic petitions to God for mercy. Wade glanced up and saw love in Glowing Sun's eyes. The kind of love Wade had known for his mother. A long-lost love.

Wade knew nothing of the Flathead language, but to him the woman's chant was a dirge. To the extent he could understand, it sounded wordless, just syllables of mourning.

He joined Glowing Sun in her prayers, asking for a miracle, because only a miracle would spare this woman.

"God, please spare her life. Guide our hands. Wisdom, Lord, give us wisdom to know what to do, how to help."

The two of them worked in desperation, one on each side of the stout woman. Stemming the bleeding, binding the wounds. Long black braids, streaked heavily with gray, hung limp. The woman's dark eyes seemed to look beyond the sky. A cry rang from her lips. Her eyes flickered closed, but the dirge continued.

"Press harder." Wade shoved a wad of cloth on top of the one soaked with blood. He moved Glowing Sun's crimson-stained fingers.

The woman didn't react to what had to be excruciating pain. She continued her death chant.

Glowing Sun's mother's song became weaker, quieter, sadder.

At last the noise ended. Wade felt the moment life left the woman and her spirit left her body.

With a cry of grief, Glowing Sun stopped her futile medical treatment and flung herself on the woman.

Wade eased back, staying close but knowing nothing he could say or do would help. Only then did he hear other moans. Other cries for help.

He lurched to his feet, his knees numb from the long time on the ground. How long had they worked on the dying woman? Were there others they'd neglected in their futile fight to save Glowing Sun's Flathead mother?

He hated to leave Glowing Sun. He couldn't insist she come. He faltered. "I've got to see if there are others who need help."

She didn't raise her eyes. Instead she started her own death chant.

Without even waiting to see if she heard him over her cries of grief, he turned and rushed toward the sound of pain.

CHAPTER 2

Wade dressed the wounds of five people. Three he expected to die within hours. They were gut shot and there was nothing that could be done. Two others had a chance, if infection didn't set in.

He'd counted nineteen dead.

The two who were less seriously wounded were still bad off. One, a half-grown boy, had a bad bullet graze cutting his leg and a gunshot wound in his shoulder. The other was an older woman, gray haired and whipcord lean. She bled from her temple. Wade had figured her for dead until she began moaning. Wade noticed when the moans at last penetrated Glowing Sun's grief.

Wade was surprised she remembered as much English as she did. Though she'd rediscovered much of the language of her birth while they'd been together in the fall, now she seemed to speak it with little effort. He wondered if she'd secretly practiced it over the winter. He also wondered if she'd thought about him.

Glowing Sun ended her chant and lurched to her feet, leaving her mother's side for the first time, turning toward the others who were hurt. "I didn't know anyone else was alive." She rushed toward the old woman just as Wade got to the woman's side and dropped to his knees.

One whole side of the woman's head was matted with blood.

"We need more bandages." Glowing Sun pulled her knife from behind her back and slit the soft doeskin of her skirt. Wade hadn't seen the knife since she'd slashed at her kidnapper.

The woman's eyes fluttered open. She focused on Glowing Sun and struck.

A hard blow knocked Glowing Sun backward. The woman rolled to her side and lunged, shouting words Wade couldn't understand.

Wade caught the woman by the waist and flipped her onto her back on the ground. Assuming she was panicking as Glowing Sun's mother had been, Wade spoke soothing words to the struggling woman. "Glowing Sun, talk to her in Flathead."

Glowing Sun lay on her back as if dazed.

The woman swung a clawed hand at Wade's face.

He caught her wrist in midair and she swung with her other hand. Wade was close enough that the blow landed on his back and did no harm. "Glowing Sun! Make her understand I want to help her."

Then Wade realized the woman, swinging her free fist, pounding on his back as he wrestled with her, was looking at Glowing Sun with clear eyes. Not like Glowing Sun's mother, who was delirious. This woman was absolutely clearheaded in her attempt to hurt both of them. But mainly Glowing Sun.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Wildflower Bride by Mary Connealy. Copyright © 2010 Mary Connealy. Excerpted by permission of Barbour Publishing, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 13 of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great Ending!

    I enjoyed this book, not nearly as much as the other two, but it was still fun. It was really cool how a side story in both of the first two books was pulled together into this book and finished. However, you don't need to read the others to read this one. She writes in such a way that you feel like you've known them forever and haven't missed a thing if you pick up in the midst of a series.

    What I liked: I liked that Mort didn't change his mind about his heir. It made it feel more real to me. I liked that while Mort made changes he never did a complete 180. The relationships all seemed very plausible and real to me. Oh, and I of course, loved that I laughed throughout the book!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 6, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    How can anybody like this book? Wade did not marry well. After

    How can anybody like this book?
    Wade did not marry well. After 8 years of living with Indians Abby hates all white people. Including all those that try to help her and her brother who is moved to tears to discover she is still alive. Wade has been brought up by a dominating physically and emotionally abusive father and then marries a dominating cold and abusive wife who is constantly threatening him with a knife. This is not a cute couple. Very disappointing book---not nearly as good as the others in the series.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Laugh Out Loud Conclusion to a FABULOUS Cowboy Series!

    The conclusion to this fabulously hilarious cowboy series is the best one yet! Now don't misunderstand me-I LOVED the first two books, but this one just had me laughing out loud more often, until I couldn't stand it! Wow! Now THAT is awesome writing. Mary Connealy is known for her wonderful cowboy series and her laugh out loud antics she throws in to them, and there is good reason,too! Not only can she make your sides hurt from laughter, she uses such detail that the stories come to life in front of the reader.

    Wildflower Bride takes us to Wade Sawyer's story. We met him first in Montana Rose (book 1), in which I just didn't like him, and saw him a bit throughout The Husband Tree (book 2), which I started to warm up to him a bit better. But reading his story here, really tugged my heart! He was a man I could easily fall in love with! (Again, Mary, I ask you if you can make him real?! ) He was such a changed man in this one. And seeing him with Abby, aka, Glowing Sun, really made my heart burst with love for both of them. Abby was a beautiful character that went through so much heartache, but was so strong in many ways. The mother in me wanted to reach out and take her under my wing and pray for her.

    This is definitely a wonderful 5 star conclusion to a "keep forever" series! If you are a Mary Connealy fan then I surely recommend you read Wildflower Bride ( and Montana Rose & The Husband Tree, too!). God's love flows through the words and shines in the characters' hearts. If you are new to Mary Connealy books and you love laugh out loud stories to end a crazy day, then start right here wish this fantastic book and it's series. I'm ready for my next dose of cowboys and laughter in Dr. In Petticoats!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 10, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Another Great Comical but Sweet Romance

    I'm a big fan of Mary Connealy. Her books never disappoint! This one is really great, as always.

    We met the hero, Wade, in Montana Rose, where he was actually the bad guy. Then in The Husband Tree, we started to really love him. That's also when we met the heroine, Abby/Glowing Sun. Wade rescued her from some bad men who had kidnapped her and then he promptly falls in love with her. But she's "engaged" to the Flathead Indian chief's son. Still, Wade holds out hope that she will one day want him and need him to rescue her again.

    And that day comes in Wildflower Bride! Abby's whole village is wiped out and Wade gets his chance to take care of her again. However, I lost count on how many times she pulls her knife on him! It's so comical to see this half-wild woman raised by Indians dealing with falling in love with Wade by constantly pulling her knife on him. I also loved how feisty and brave and capable she is. She actually always ends up saving herself before Wade gets a chance to. But he keeps on thinking that if he hangs around long enough, she'll actually need him!

    Mary Connealy is the queen of comical situations in romance. I just loved this latest one. Very sweet and romantic, too.

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  • Posted June 11, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    great western romance

    Mary Connealy has done it again. I loved reading Wildflower Bride and discovering that the characters from the first books in the series are still having their happily ever-afters. Its great to be reconnected with characters you've grown to love. And Mary's characters are terrific. Mary writes with a blend of humor, deep characterization and plots that are never slow. The action and romance make it difficult to put down one of her books. Wildflower Bride doesn't disappoint. Its definitely a keeper and you'll love seeing the growth Wade has come through over the length of the series. Really shows God's mercy and redemption. I can hardly wait for Mary's next series.

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