Wildflower Girl

Wildflower Girl

4.3 3
by Marita Conlon-McKenna, Donald Teskey
     
 

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The second book in the famine trilogy

At seven, Peggy made a terrifying journey through famine-stricken Ireland. Now thirteen, and determined to make a new life for herself, she sets off alone across the Atlantic to America. Will she ever see her family again?

An extraordinary story of courage, independence and adventure

The other books in

Overview

The second book in the famine trilogy

At seven, Peggy made a terrifying journey through famine-stricken Ireland. Now thirteen, and determined to make a new life for herself, she sets off alone across the Atlantic to America. Will she ever see her family again?

An extraordinary story of courage, independence and adventure

The other books in the Famine trilogy are Under the Hawthorn Tree and Fields of Home. A study guide to Under the Hawthorn tree is also available.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-- Historic validity and a dramatic writing style work together here to create an engrossing and realistic tale. This sequel to Under the Hawthorn Tree (Holiday, 1990) focuses on 13-year-old Peggy O'Driscoll as she makes her way to America from Ireland after the Great Famine that left her an orphan. Just as the earlier book depicts the hardships of the time, this one offers an honest picture of the problems of immigration. And while it gives readers solid historical background, it also serves up a well-written story with characters who, although somewhat stereotypical, are believable. Passage to America is being offered, and Peggy takes advantage of it. She arrives in Boston with no place to go, but soon finds her way to a home for young girls. She ultimately goes into service to a wealthy family, and it is here that her life in America begins to take shape. Readers will feel the enormity of her decision and the pain of leaving loved ones behind. All the complications of embarking on the journey become clear. The dismal conditions in steerage and the relentless seasickness can almost be felt through Colon-McKenna's sharp prose. High-quality historical fiction.-- Renee Steinberg, Fieldstone Middle School, Montvale, NJ

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781847176011
Publisher:
Irish American Book Company
Publication date:
08/01/2013
Series:
Children of the Famine Trilogy , #2
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
176
File size:
3 MB
Age Range:
10 Years

Meet the Author

Born in Dublin in 1956 and brought up in Goatstown, Marita went to school at the Convent of the Sacred Heart, Mount Anville, later working in the family business, the bank, and a travel agency. She has four children with her husband James, and they live in the Stillorgan area of Dublin.

Marita was always fascinated by the Famine period in Irish history and read everything available on the subject. When she heard a radio report of an unmarked children's grave from the Famine period being found under a hawthorn tree, she decided to write her first book, Under the Hawthorn Tree.

Published in May 1990, the book was an immediate success and become a classic. It has been translated into over a dozen languages, including Arabic, Bahasa, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Italian, Japanese and Irish. The book has been read on RTÉ Radio and is very popular in schools, both with teachers and pupils. It has been made a supplementary curriculum reader in many schools and is also used by schools in Northern Ireland for EMU (Education through Mutual Understanding) projects. It was also filmed by Young Irish Film Makers, in association with RTÉ and Channel 4. This is available as a DVD.

Marita has written more books for children which were also very well received. The Blue Horse reached No. 1 on the Bestseller List and won the BISTO BOOK OF THE YEAR Award. No Goodbye, which tells of the heartbreak of a young family when their mother leaves home, was recommended by Book Trust in their guide for One Parent Families. Safe Harbour is the story of two English children evacuated from London during World War ll to live with their grandfather in Greystones, Co Wicklow and was shortlisted for the BISTO Book of the Year Award. A Girl Called Blue follows the life of an orphan, trying to find who she really is in a cold and strict orphanage. Marita has also explored the world of fantasy with her book In Deep Dark Wood.

Marita has won several awards, including the International Reading Association Award, the Osterreichischer Kinder und Jugendbuchpreis, the Reading Association of Ireland Award and the Bisto Book of the Year Award.

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Wildflower Girl 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
mweaver More than 1 year ago
During my genealogy research someone suggested I read "Under the Hawthorne Tree" to get an idea of the life of children during The Great Hunger. This is the second book and I highly recommend it for anyone who enjoys historical fiction and for getting an understanding of the time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wildflower Girl is a plain-out excellent book. It is about a 13 year old Irish girl that goes to America looking for a good place to live and work. I would recomend this book to people around 11-25. Especially if you are from a different country coming to America!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was pretty good but not to die for and i did not like the ending.