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Wildflowers of the Appalachian Trail
     

Wildflowers of the Appalachian Trail

5.0 3
by Leonard Adkins
 

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Wildflowers of the Appalachian Trail is the go-to resource for anyone interested in the wildflowers found along the 2,175-mile-long Appalachian National Scenic Trail. Stunning full-page color photos by Joe Cook and Monica Cook accompany the detailed descriptions by author Leonard Adkins. Also included for many of the 94 flowers profiled in the book is the

Overview

Wildflowers of the Appalachian Trail is the go-to resource for anyone interested in the wildflowers found along the 2,175-mile-long Appalachian National Scenic Trail. Stunning full-page color photos by Joe Cook and Monica Cook accompany the detailed descriptions by author Leonard Adkins. Also included for many of the 94 flowers profiled in the book is the fascinating role the flower has played through history and its value in folkloric as well as modern medicine.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780897328784
Publisher:
Menasha Ridge Press
Publication date:
06/15/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
214
File size:
49 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Read an Excerpt

Although it is now most appreciated for the beauty of its flower, Star Chickweed has been of great value through the centuries to birds, animals, and humans. Several species of birds find its seeds to be quite delectable (which accounts for one of its other common names, Birdseed), while grazing animals are drawn to it for its rich copper content.The plant can still be found for sale in the early spring in some markets of Europe; when picked before the flowers develop, it is considered to be more tender than many other wild greens. Its raw leaves are added to salads and, when boiled, taste like fresh-cooked spinach. Because it is high in vitamins A and C, Star Chickweed has been helpful in the treatment of scurvy. It has also been used as a poultice for abscesses and boils, and some people believe that bathing in water in which it has been boiled will reduce swelling.

While on the trail, you can use the Star Chickweed to help you predict the weather. According to folklore, the sun will be shining bright if the blossoms are spread out to their fullest. If they begin to close up, you had better get out the raingear, as precipitation will begin to fall within the next few hours.

Somewhat similar in appearance,Common Chickweed (Stellaria media) is found from Georgia to Maine, but its petals are shorter than its sepals—the opposite of Star Chickweed. Mouse-ear Chickweed (Cerastium vulgatum) has hairy, oval, sessile leaves that resemble mouse ears and a stem that is covered by sticky hairs. The petals and sepals of its flowers are about equal in length.

Some places along the AT you are likely to encounter one of the Chickweeds: At the base of Amicalola Falls on the AT approach trail in Georgia; north of Angel’s Rest in southwest Virginia; on the side trail to Sunset field and on The Priest in central Virginia; and south of Pocosin fire Road in Shenandoah National Park.

Meet the Author

Leonard M. Adkins, profiled by Backpacker magazine, and referred to as “The Habitual Hiker,” has hiked more than 20,000 miles exploring the backcountry areas of the U.S., Canada, Europe, and the Caribbean. Almost every hiking season finds him on some new and exciting adventure. He has hiked the full length of the Appalachian Trail five times (click the Hiking GA to ME button above to read reports from the fifth journey); traversed the Continental Divide from Canada to Mexico; followed the Pacific Northwest Trail through Montana, Idaho, and Washington; and walked Canada’s Great Divide Trail. Other long-distance journeys include Vermont’s Long Trail, West Virginia’s Allegheny Trail, and the Ozark Highlands Trail in Arkansas. His adventures in Europe include a trek of the Pyrenees High Route from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean along the border of France and Spain and an exploration of Iceland’s interior.

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Wildflowers of the Appalachian Trail 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
By far the most beautiful wildflower guide I've ever used. Each flower photo is a full page in size, none of that 6-8 photos on a page so that you can't make out any detail. And what photos! Joe and Monica Cook's photographic skills really shine here. I'm almost thinking of buying a second copy, just so I can frame some of the pictures. I was also tired of using books that just told me how to identify a plant. Adkins tells you that, but also much more--medicinal uses, how a plant got its name, why is grows where it does or why it is a particular shape. Tell me a flower has five sepals, four petals, etc. and I won't remember, but give me a story and the plant comes alive. The book won the National Outdoor Book Award, ForeWord Magazine's Book of the Year Award and, amazingly for what is essentially a photo book, a Virginia Literary Award. All justified in my mind.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic photos and fascinating narrative
Guest More than 1 year ago
Full-color, full page photographs of each wildlfower makes it easy to identify flowers out in the field. Yet, the photos are so stunningly beautiful that this book could easily qualify as a coffee table book. The author's descriptions of the flowers go way beyond just identifying them. The plant 'biographies' (as I call them) provide entire backgrounds on the plants that are often overlooked by most other field guides. You learn why a plant grows where it does, why it's shaped the way it is, how it got its common or scientific name, folklore, traditional and modern medicinal uses, its role in history, and much, much more. There are even references to specific places where you may find each plant on the AT. This is not your typical dull or ordinary wildflower guide. It's a visual feast for the eyes and a great, informative tome on one the AT's most distinctive features--the wildflowers.