Wildlife Atlas

Wildlife Atlas

by Robin Kerrod, John Stidworthy
     
 

The superb color photos and beautiful maps of Facts On File Wildlife Atlas create the excitement of a safari. The book details the unique mix of creatures on each of the seven continents, revealing why and how they live where they do. Packed with fact boxes, curiosities, quiz questions and examples of the influence of wildlife on stamps and coins, young readers… See more details below

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Overview

The superb color photos and beautiful maps of Facts On File Wildlife Atlas create the excitement of a safari. The book details the unique mix of creatures on each of the seven continents, revealing why and how they live where they do. Packed with fact boxes, curiosities, quiz questions and examples of the influence of wildlife on stamps and coins, young readers discover the existence supported by the bounty of Mother Nature. Full-color photos, maps, diagrams.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Kathleen Hutchins
A wildlife atlas of the world in eighty pages is a tall order. In an attempt to cover all the continents, all the major biomes, highlight common animals of each area, and discuss evolution, migration, and endangered species, all topics have been reduced to two pages. As would be expected in an atlas, maps are numerous. However, their value is questionable. There are political maps that also show geographic features. They are useful on a global scale but have too little information for a specific country, state, or biome. Other atlases could provide the same information. There are fewer animal distribution maps. They are very deceiving. For example, numerous animals are scattered and numbered across the map of Africa. Since neither political boundaries nor areas of human population are shown, it appears that the whole of Africa is inhabited only by wild animals. This is also true of Europe and the other continents. It is not clear whether various species share areas or are segregated, or what their population densities are. To learn the name of the animal the reader must go to the index, match the number of the map and the number of the animal, and then learn only the name. The pages are busy with extremely short paragraphs of one to three facts. Because the information is very sketchy, wrong conclusions may be drawn. Pitcher plants seem only to grow in Borneo and the Philippines, worldwide distribution is not mentioned. There are many photographs and drawings, but the captions may be anywhere on the page. The indexes are not very useful. The place names do not tie into the text nor relate to specific animals. The print requires a magnifying glass. Animals are indexed only once and only on a map, so that if an interesting tidbit appears somewhere else, it will only be found by chance. This atlas may work for browsing. It could provide small bits of information to complete a report, but the information is too brief, too scattered, and too disconnected to use as the basis of a report on biomes, habitats, or specific animals. Index. Illus. Photos. Maps. VOYA Codes: 2Q 1P M J (Better editing or work by the author might have warranted a 3Q, No YA will read unless forced to for assignments, Middle School-defined as grades 6 to 8 and Junior High-defined as grades 7 to 9).

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780816037148
Publisher:
Facts on File, Incorporated
Publication date:
12/28/1997
Series:
Atlas Series
Edition description:
2ND
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
9.75(w) x 11.70(h) x 0.45(d)
Age Range:
9 - 14 Years

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