Wildlife Habitat Relationships in Oregon and Washington

Wildlife Habitat Relationships in Oregon and Washington

by David H. Johnson
     
 
The biggest challenge facing natural resource conservation efforts today is to maintain biological diversity and viable ecosystems. This requires the best available scientific information on the relationships between individual species and their habitat.

Wildlife-Habitat Relationships in Oregon and Washington is the first book to compile and synthesize in a

Overview

The biggest challenge facing natural resource conservation efforts today is to maintain biological diversity and viable ecosystems. This requires the best available scientific information on the relationships between individual species and their habitat.

Wildlife-Habitat Relationships in Oregon and Washington is the first book to compile and synthesize in a single convenient, comprehensive volume a vast amount of diverse information on 593 wildlife species and their relationships with the 32 terrestrial, freshwater, and marine habitat types of Oregon and Washington.

Included are color photographs of each habitat type, as well as hundreds of maps, diagrams, and other illustrations. In addition, a separate CD-ROM (included with the book) contains additional wildlife data and color maps, and seven matrixes that link wildlife species with their respective habitat types.

The 88 contributing authors include experts in wildlife, botany, fisheries, conservation biology, vegetation mapping, and the ecology of forest, rangeland, and marine environments, among other fields.

Intended for use by natural resource managers and planners, scientists, conservationists, educators, and other individuals with a deep interest in wildlife species and their habitats, this book is sure to be a valuable resource and standard reference for many years to come.

About the Managing Directors :
David Johnson has held forestry, wildlife, biologist, and habitat scientist positions with a number of natural resource agencies, including the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife. He is the author of 25 publications on conservation and management of wildlife species.

Tom O'Neil is director of the Northwest Habitat Institute and has worked as a wildlife ecologist and biologist for a number of organizations and agencies, including the U.S. Forest Service and the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife. He has written more than 40 publications and is co-author of the Atlas of Oregon Wildlife (OSU Press).

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This volume provides information about the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine habitats of Oregon and Washington and the wildlife that depend upon them; it also supports broader and more consistent conservation planning, management, and research. The 27 chapters identify 593 wildlife species, define some 300 wildlife terms, profile wildlife communities, review introduced and extirpated species and species at risk, and discuss management approaches. The volume includes color and b&w photographs, maps, diagrams, and illustrations; and the accompanying CD-ROM contains additional wildlife data (60,000 records), maps, and seven matrixes that link wildlife species with their respective habitat types. Johnson is a wildlife biologist, engineer, and habitat scientist; and O'Neill is director of the Northwest Habitat Institute; they worked together on this publication project as its managing directors. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780870714887
Publisher:
Oregon State University Press
Publication date:
02/01/2001
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
736
Product dimensions:
8.83(w) x 11.29(h) x 1.99(d)

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What People are saying about this

Jack Ward Thomas
Wildlife-Habitat Relationships in Oregon and Washington is a long needed upgrade of the wildlife habitat relationships work that was pioneered in the Pacific northwest in the late 1970's and early 1980's. This new, and most excellent, work in the field, upgraded with the new information and insights that have become available over the intervening decades, will prove a boon to land managers. Further, it will serve as the new standard to guide development of similarly upgraded wildlife habitat relationships packages for other regions of North America.
—(Jack Ward Thomas, Boone and Crockeet Professor, School of Forestry, University of Montana, and Chief Emeritus, U.S. Forest Service)

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