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Will Rogers: A Political Life
     

Will Rogers: A Political Life

by Richard D. White Jr.
 
He was the top male box office attraction at the movies, one of the most widely read newspaper columnists in America, a radio commentator with an audience of more than 60 million, and a globetrotting speaker who filled lecture halls across the land. But how did humorist Will Rogers also become one of the most powerful political figures of his day? From just before

Overview

He was the top male box office attraction at the movies, one of the most widely read newspaper columnists in America, a radio commentator with an audience of more than 60 million, and a globetrotting speaker who filled lecture halls across the land. But how did humorist Will Rogers also become one of the most powerful political figures of his day? From just before World War I, through the Roaring Twenties, Prohibition, and the Great Depression, Rogers provided a refreshing yet sobering appraisal of current events and public policy. Through him, millions formed their opinion of President Wilson's quest for a League of Nations, debated freedom of speech and religion during the Scopes Monkey Trial, questioned the success of several disarmament conferences, took pity upon the sufferers of the Great Flood of 1927, and tried to grasp the awful reality of the Great Depression. Rogers visited Washington often to attend congressional sessions and official receptions, testify at hearings, meet with cabinet officers, and speak at the exclusive Gridiron and Alfalfa Clubs. His open access to the Oval Office, the Senate cloakroom, and other inner sancta of national power was unmatched for someone not holding public office. In this groundbreaking biography Richard D. White argues that the nation's most popular entertainer was not only an incisive political commentator but also a significant influence upon national leaders and their decisions. When Will Rogers perished in a plane crash in Alaska in 1935, Americans lost their most popular and beloved humorist, a man who put smiles on their faces, took their minds off war and depression and, for a moment, allowed them to laugh at his cracker-barrel humor and ultimately themselves. But Americans also lost their most trusted source of reason, a man who, more than any other, broke down the complex issues of the day and gave them a critically honest appraisal of American politics and world affairs.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This is the first biography of Rogers (1879-1935), entertainer, columnist, and pundit, to focus largely on his political influence. White (public administration, Louisiana State Univ.; Kingfish: The Reign of Huey P. Long) examines Rogers, one of the most famous men of his day, as an intellectual with a humble touch, a man of prescience on national and global affairs and with substantial influence upon American politicians and plain folk alike. He argues that Rogers played a strong role shaping American opinion on topics from Prohibition and intervention in global affairs—both of which he ardently opposed—to New Deal policies and commercial air flight—which he backed. White reviews Rogers's trips as unofficial envoy to China and the Soviet Union, as well as his fallibility in embracing some of history's villains, in particular Mussolini, because he had "never met a man he didn't like." VERDICT Through his newspaper columns, radio show, and movie roles, Rogers was very famous in his own time—the world mourned his death in a plane crash—but he is largely unknown to today's younger generations. White's presentation may change that. Comparing favorably with previous biographies of Rogers, this is recommended primarily for readers of 20th-century American studies.—Laura Ruttum, Denver, CO
New York Times Book Review - John Schwartz

“John Stewart, Stephen Colbert and Molly Ivins owe a debt to Rogers, as does Rush Limbaugh when he’s actually funny and not just mean. But in his day, Rogers was bigger than all of them. . . . Proving one unelected man’s influence isn’t easy, but White makes a convincing case that Rogers had plenty.” –-New York Times Book Review
Journal of American History - Peter M. Robinson

“[A] welcome and necessary book. . . . White’s valuable and timely study will reintroduce a wide range of readers to the man who . . . exercised the political power of laughter borne not of cynicism or enmity, but celebratory democracy.” —Journal of American History

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780896726765
Publisher:
Texas Tech University Press
Publication date:
02/10/2011
Edition description:
1
Pages:
380
Sales rank:
1,252,775
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 9.50(h) x 1.20(d)

Meet the Author

Richard D. White, Jr., a former senior officer in the U.S. Coast Guard and icebreaker captain, received his Ph.D. from Penn State University. The author of Roosevelt the Reformer: Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner 1889–1895 and Kingfish: The Reign of Huey P. Long, he is a professor of public administration and an associate dean at Louisiana State University. He lives in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

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