Will Shortz Presents Easy to Hard Sudoku
  • Will Shortz Presents Easy to Hard Sudoku
  • Will Shortz Presents Easy to Hard Sudoku

Will Shortz Presents Easy to Hard Sudoku

by Will Shortz
     
 

If you haven't already discovered the number puzzle that The New York Post calls "diabolically addictive," you'll soon discover that playing sudoku is like eating potato chips: you can't stop with just one!

Here you'll find 150 puzzles—presented by New York Times crossword editor and bestselling author Will Shortz—to whet your

…  See more details below

Overview

If you haven't already discovered the number puzzle that The New York Post calls "diabolically addictive," you'll soon discover that playing sudoku is like eating potato chips: you can't stop with just one!

Here you'll find 150 puzzles—presented by New York Times crossword editor and bestselling author Will Shortz—to whet your appetite, boggle your brain, and improve your playing skills at any level. The object is to fill the puzzle grid with numbers so that every row, column, and three-by-three square contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating. Once you get the hang of it, playing sudoku can be downright hypnotic as you work the numbers around the grid. And experts can enjoy the trying to solve the puzzles faster and faster!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Diabolically addictive.” —The New York Post

“A puzzling global phenomenon.” —The Economist

“The biggest craze to hit The Times since the first crossword puzzle was published in 1935. Sudoku is dangerous stuff. Forget work and family--think papers hurled across the room and industrial-sized blobs of correction fluid. I love it!” —The Times of London

“England's most addictive newspaper puzzle.” —New York magazine

“The latest craze in games.” —BBC News

“Sudoku are to the first decade of the twenty-first century what Rubik's Cube was to the 1970s.” —The Daily Telegraph

“Britain has a new addiction. Hunched over newspapers on crowded subway trains, sneaking secret peeks in the office, a puzzle-crazy nation is trying to slot numbers into small checkerboard grids.” —Associated Press

“Forget crosswords.” —The Christian Science Monitor

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312949785
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
10/03/2006
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
684,722
Product dimensions:
4.28(w) x 6.62(h) x 0.52(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Will Shortz Presents Easy to Hard Sudoku


By Will Shortz

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2006 Will Shortz
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780312949785

Introduction
They say everything old is new again. This is certainly true of kakuro, the new international puzzle sensation.
 
Despite the trendy Japanese name, kakuro, like sudoku before it, is not originally Japanese—and not particularly new. More on its surprising history in a moment.
 
The Idea of Kakuro
 
The object of kakuro is quite simple:
 
You’re given a crossword-like grid with clue numbers in the shaded squares. The object is to complete the grid by putting a single digit from 1 to 9 in each white square. A clue number represents the sum of the digits to be placed in the squares to the right of it (for an Across answer) or beneath it (for a Down answer). No digit is repeated within an answer. In many of the puzzles, starting answers and/or digits have been filled in for you.
 
Like sudoku, kakuro is a grid puzzle using numbers. Unlike sudoku, solving requires actually adding and subtracting (nothing more complicated than that). But again, like sudoku, kakuro is a logic puzzle in which the object is to narrow down the possibilities for each square until you find the one that is correct.
 
In Japan, where kakuro has been popular for twenty years, it is called “the king of pencilpuzzles”—no mean label in a country with dozens of wildly popular varieties of logic puzzles.
 
And in Britain, where kakuro was introduced in 2005 to rave reviews—and is now featured in several bestselling books—it has been proclaimed “even more addictive than sudoku!”
 
The History of Kakuro: Around the Globe and Back
 
Kakuro is one of the oldest grid logic puzzles in existence. We’ve traced it back to the April/May 1950 issue of Official Crossword Puzzles, published by Dell Publishing Company, where it was called “Cross Sums.” It was the brainchild of a Canadian building constructor, Jacob E. Funk. Published intermittently at first, Cross Sums grew in popularity, and by the mid-1960s was appearing in every issue of every Dell puzzle magazine.
 
Originally, Cross Sums was presented like a crossword, with its numerical clues at the side. For example, 1-Across, “Twelve,” 4-Across, “Fifteen,” et cetera.
 
In 1966, someone—we’ll probably never know who—had the brainstorm of putting the clues inside the grid, making the puzzle more compact and convenient to do. This is how the puzzle has appeared ever since.
 
Cross Sums went international in the 1980s, when a Japanese puzzle editor took the puzzle home from the United States and introduced it in his magazines under the name “Kasan kuroso.” This is Japanese for “addition” plus the Japanese pronunciation of “cross.” Eventually, the name was shortened to “kakkuro.” Again, spiraling popularity.
 
In 2005, The Guardian and Daily Mail newspapers in Britain introduced “kakuro” (as they called it) as a daily feature, and from there the puzzle craze has quickly spread around the globe.
 
Trying Is Believing
 
If you’ve never tried a kakuro puzzle before, you may find it daunting at first. In fact, it may look impossible. But perseverance will pay off. It’s a richly rewarding puzzle that will stretch your brain in ways different from sudoku or any other puzzle you’ve ever done.
 
The one hundred kakuro puzzles in this book start very easy and get more difficult as they proceed. The first ninety puzzles contain starting answers and digits, while the last ten puzzles have no starting hints at all.
 
For solving tips and strategies, see the following pages.
 
Good luck!
 
—Will Shortz
 
Copyright © 2006 by Will Shortz



Continues...

Excerpted from Will Shortz Presents Easy to Hard Sudoku by Will Shortz Copyright © 2006 by Will Shortz. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Meet the Author

Will Shortz has been the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times since 1993. He is also the puzzlemaster on NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday and is founder and director of the annual American Crossword Puzzle Tournament. He has edited countless books of crossword puzzles, Sudoku, KenKen, and all manner of brain-busters.

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