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Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights: The Collapse of Journalism and What Can Be Done To Fix It
     

Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights: The Collapse of Journalism and What Can Be Done To Fix It

by Robert W. McChesney (Editor), Victor Pickard (Editor), Robert Chesney (Editor)
 

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The Sudden meltdown of the news media has sparked one of the liveliest debates in recent memory, with an outpouring of opinion and analysis crackling across journals, the blogosphere, and academic publications. Yet, until now, we have lacked a comprehensive and accessible introduction to this new and shifting terrain.

In Will the Last Reporter Please Turn Out the

Overview

The Sudden meltdown of the news media has sparked one of the liveliest debates in recent memory, with an outpouring of opinion and analysis crackling across journals, the blogosphere, and academic publications. Yet, until now, we have lacked a comprehensive and accessible introduction to this new and shifting terrain.

In Will the Last Reporter Please Turn Out the Lights, celebrated media analysts Robert W. McChesney and Victor Pickard have assembled illuminating perspectives on the crisis in journalism, by today's most incisive and influential commentators. This accessible volume provides a comprehensive portrait of the newspaper industry's predicament-including a concise history of modern journalism, a hard-hitting analysis of the structural and financial causes of news media's sudden collapse, and deeply informed proposals for how the vital role of journalism might be rescued from impending disaster.

The essential guide to the journalism crisis, Will the Last Reporter Please Turn Out the Lights is both a primer on the news media today and a chronicle of a key historical moment in the transformation of the press.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This collection highlights journalism's role as a crucial component of democracy and an institution that needs to be reinvigorated... anyone concerned about the state of journalism should read this book."
Library Journal

“Bold, meditative, engrossing, this is an indispensable guide for followers of modern media.”
Booklist

“[I]nformative and concise…A well-curated collection of essays on the decline of the newspaper industry and the future of journalism.”
Kirkus

Library Journal
Is it the end of journalism as we know it? Editors McChesney (communications, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Rich Media, Poor Democracy) and Pickard (media, culture, & communication, New York Univ.) present a collection of essays that attempt to analyze the American news media and what needs to be done to protect the Fourth Estate. The pieces address the current crisis of journalism, namely, that newspapers are disappearing, new digital media and social networks are fracturing audiences even more than cable TV did, and journalists are falling behind in their job to "fact-check, analyze, and critique information." Written by both liberal and conservative journalists and media scholars, these essays offer a variety of ideas and solutions to the crisis. The collection highlights journalism's role as a crucial component of democracy and as an institution that needs to be reinvigorated in the face of sweeping global technological and economic changes. VERDICT Journalism students and anyone concerned with the state of journalism and the state of the union should read this thought-provoking book.—Donna Marie Smith, Palm Beach Cty. Lib. Syst., FL
Kirkus Reviews

A well-curated collection of essays on the decline of the newspaper industry and the future of journalism.

Edited by McChesney (Communications/Univ. of Illinois; co-author: The Death and Life of American Journalism, 2010, etc.) and Pickard (Media, Culture, and Communication/New York Univ.), the book addresses topics ranging from content mills and the rise of "citizen journalism" to social justice in the media and conservative investigative journalism. Varying in tone from the breezy and snappy (Clay Shirky's "Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable") to the heavily footnoted and academic (Pickard's "Revisiting the Road Not Taken: A Social Democratic Vision of the Press"), these essays give rise to two general conclusions: 1) though the collapse of paper newspapers does not have to mean the destruction of journalism, it is unlikely that it can survive absent a supporting institution; 2) that government financial support of the newspaper industry, which has a historical basis, may be the answer to the crisis in journalism. Most of the essays are informative and concise, but they often appear with little context. Aside from a brief introduction to the book and three very brief introductions to each section, readers must sort through the sometimes contradictory conclusions drawn by the essays. This spare editorial apparatus suggests that this book, though certainly accessible to the average reader, will most likely be purchased by students assigned to read it for a class, where a professor and classmates can provide a certain amount of guidance. In The Death and Life of American Journalism, McChesney addressed similar questions and offered similar answers.

Current and often enlightening—of particular interest to academic libraries—but not essential.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781595585486
Publisher:
New Press, The
Publication date:
05/03/2011
Pages:
372
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author


Robert W. McChesney is the Gutgsell Endowed Professor in the Department of Communications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of several books on the media, including the award-winning Rich Media, Poor Democracy, and a co-editor (with Ben Scott) of Our Unfree Press: 100 Years of Radical Media Criticism (both available from The New Press). He lives in Urbana, Illinois.

Victor Pickard is an assistant professor in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University. His research on the politics and history of media has been published widely in anthologies and scholarly journals. He lives in New York City.

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