William Clark and the Shaping of the West

William Clark and the Shaping of the West

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by Landon Y. Jones
     
 

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Between 1803 and 1806, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark cocaptained the most famous expedition in American history. But while Lewis ended his life just three years after the expedition, Clark, as the highest-ranking federal official in the West, spent three decades overseeing its consequences: Indian removal and the destruction of Native America. In a rare

Overview


Between 1803 and 1806, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark cocaptained the most famous expedition in American history. But while Lewis ended his life just three years after the expedition, Clark, as the highest-ranking federal official in the West, spent three decades overseeing its consequences: Indian removal and the destruction of Native America. In a rare combination of storytelling and scholarship, bestselling author Landon Y. Jones vividly depicts Clark’s life and the dark and bloody ground of America’s early West, capturing the qualities of character and courage that made Clark an unequaled leader in America’s grander enterprise: the shaping of the West.

Editorial Reviews

Los Angeles Times Book Review - Jonathan Kirsch

“William Clark’s remarkable life story is told with color, panache and authority.”—Jonathan Kirsch, Los Angeles Times Book Review
Seattle Times - Kevin J. Hamilton

“Jones’ masterful biography brings to life the gritty and brutal existence of life on the American frontier.”—Kevin J. Hamilton, Seattle Times
Washington Post - Mark Lewis

“It was Clark, not Lewis, who nursed Sacagawea when she was ill and who later paid for her son’s education. It was Clark who wrote the misspelled entry—‘Ocian in view! O! The Joy!’—that so charmingly evokes the moment when their party finally sighted the Pacific. And it was Clark who enjoyed the more interesting life, as Landon Y. Jones makes clear.”—Mark Lewis, Washington Post
Oregonian - Peter Sleeth

William Clark and the Shaping of the West is engrossing history, the kind of book that is hard to set down.”—Peter Sleeth, Oregonian
Smithsonian Magazine - Owen Edwards

“A deeply researched, splendidly written biography.”—Owen Edwards, Smithsonian Magazine
Smithsonian Magazine

“A deeply researched, splendidly written biography.”—Owen Edwards, Smithsonian Magazine

— Owen Edwards

Washington Post

“It was Clark, not Lewis, who nursed Sacagawea when she was ill and who later paid for her son’s education. It was Clark who wrote the misspelled entry—‘Ocian in view! O! The Joy!’—that so charmingly evokes the moment when their party finally sighted the Pacific. And it was Clark who enjoyed the more interesting life, as Landon Y. Jones makes clear.”—Mark Lewis, Washington Post

— Mark Lewis

Seattle Times

“Jones’ masterful biography brings to life the gritty and brutal existence of life on the American frontier.”—Kevin J. Hamilton, Seattle Times

— Kevin J. Hamilton

Oregonian

William Clark and the Shaping of the West is engrossing history, the kind of book that is hard to set down.”—Peter Sleeth, Oregonian

— Peter Sleeth

Los Angeles Times Book Review

“William Clark’s remarkable life story is told with color, panache and authority.”—Jonathan Kirsch, Los Angeles Times Book Review

— Jonathan Kirsch

Men's Journal

“[A] sweeping, battle-strewn bio.”—Men’s Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803226975
Publisher:
UNP - Bison Books
Publication date:
10/01/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
424
Sales rank:
874,634
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author


Landon Y. Jones was the managing editor of People magazine for eight years and wrote and edited for Life, Time, Money, and People for thirty-seven years. His books include Great Expectations: America and the Baby Boom Generation and The Essential Lewis and Clark. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey, and Bozeman, Montana

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William Clark and the Shaping of the West 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Overall, not a bad read. I think the author didn't spend enough time on the Lewis & Clark expedition. After Lewis dies the last third of the book seems to be more aboubt the travesity of how we treated the American Indian versus about Clark. The lasfgt part of the book seemed slow and I finished the book feeling i still didn't mknow Clark that well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After reading 'Undaunted Courage' by Stephen E. Ambrose way back in 1997, I wondered what ever happened to Lewis's buddy Clark after Lewis committed suicide. Well, now the Clark biography is finally out! I learned about the most important Indian treaty in U.S. history, namely the 1795 Treaty of Greenville. The subsequent Indian treaties are mere follow-ups. The author only devotes 1 chapter to the famous Lewis & Clark journey, which is fine for those that already read 'Undaunted Courage' first. The author hops around a little with the timeline of events but it works out.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book for the Lewis and Clark fan or anyone. The author has searched sources I've never seen before and compiled some very interesting new facts about Clark and the times. He spins the whiskey-indians point a bit too much. Judging a society 200 years ago by today's standards. For example, instead of reporting the traders drank eight ounces of whiskey a day, he criticizes Clark for letting them take 12 gallons (!!!) for a half years trip.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is an excellent portrayal of a complex leader and a man who survived by killing and taking property from Indians directly or indirectly, his entire life. Clark was in the advance party that provided a map for the settlers to seize more land and take more lives during the creation of the nation known as the USA today. It is a sad,sad tragic story and part of a fabric of deceit that is the bedrock foundation of the USA, long overdue in its delineation but known intuitively to all but the most ignorant and naive patriots. It should be required reading for the 4th of July celebrations in a nation that champions freedom, and truth that it is built on theft, half-truths and murder. Nation building means death to the owners of land, overpowered by technology and outwitted by scheming invaders masquerading as friends. Clark shows his American character in this telling book.