William Pitt

William Pitt

by Charles Whibley
     
 

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Contents Include: The Triumph of Youth Peace and Economy The War with France Sedition at Home The Union with Ireland The Last Years The Statesman and the Man

Overview

Contents Include: The Triumph of Youth Peace and Economy The War with France Sedition at Home The Union with Ireland The Last Years The Statesman and the Man

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781406789744
Publisher:
Pierides Press
Publication date:
01/01/2007
Pages:
364
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.81(d)

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CHAPTER III. THE WAR WITH FRANCE. It is the irony of Pitt's career that, being by sympathy and temperament a great lover of peace, he should have been called upon to conduct the most desperate war of modern times. Though he was bred in the bellicose school of his father, he would gladly have exchanged the glories of war for the calm pursuits of economy and reform. But, while his preference was strong, he was not a man to avoid his legitimate reponsibilities. Deeply interested in foreign affairs, he had already madeEngland's name respected abroad, and with the aid of Sir James Harris had effectually foiled France's pretensions in Holland. That was in 1787, and even then he was prepared to offer to the well- meaning party in the United Provinces the same help of which in later years so much is heard, " pecuniary relief for the present, and assurances of support for the future." Fortunately the tact of Sir James Harris made armed intervention unnecessary, and England was not called upon to disturb her " state of growing affluence and prosperity." Two years later a dispute with Spain brought us to the very verge of hostilities. An English ship, peaceably anchored in Nootka Sound, off Vancouver, was seized by two Spanish men-of-war, and the English flag which flew over the settlement was torn down in circumstances ofintolerable insult. The reparation demanded by Pitt being refused, the Minister asked for a general impressment of seamen and a credit of a million, and war would certainly have followed had not Spain, deserted by France, made a complete submission. A quarrel with Russia had not the same satisfactory result. After a long and complicated discussion Catherine II. refused torestore Ockzakov, which she had taken from the Turks. Pitt, whose policy, unlike his fa...

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