William Tyndale: A Biography

William Tyndale: A Biography

5.0 1
by David Daniell
     
 

ISBN-10: 0300068808

ISBN-13: 9780300068801

Pub. Date: 02/28/2001

Publisher: Yale University Press

This major biography traces the dramatic life of William Tyndale, the first person to translate the Bible into English from the original Greek and Hebrew, and discusses the profound religious, literary, intellectual, and social implications of his immense achievement. Tyndale's masterful translation, which gave the laity access to God, formed the basis of all English

Overview

This major biography traces the dramatic life of William Tyndale, the first person to translate the Bible into English from the original Greek and Hebrew, and discusses the profound religious, literary, intellectual, and social implications of his immense achievement. Tyndale's masterful translation, which gave the laity access to God, formed the basis of all English bibles, including the "King James Bible," and made significant and lasting contributions to the English language.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780300068801
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Publication date:
02/28/2001
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
440
Sales rank:
515,638
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.75(h) x (d)

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William Tyndale 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When studying religion, literature, or history, it is easy for the average reader to become overwhelmed. Every now and then a writer comes along who has a unique gift for being able to assimilate complex subject matter and present it in simple terms, without sacrificing accuracy or insulting their readers intelligence. To do this, it is necessary for a writer to truly be an expert on the subject you are discussing (which often involves many years, sometimes a lifetime, of hard work) while also being able to convey this knowledge to readers who most likely are nowhere near the level of expertise of the writer. Teachers from elementary school level on up to doctoral advisers at a University know this (most of them). Roland Bainton and Heiko Oberman were such writers. David Daniell is another. In this book, William Tyndale: A Biography, Daniell is writing about another such writer. William Tyndale, as Daniell clearly articulates in the book, was able to become a master of his craft (namely, the Bible, and especially in the original languages of Greek and Hebrew) and then to present the Bible in English to the readers of his time period (and well beyond, as Daniell also demonstrates). Daniell, like Tyndale, is concerned to be as direct and clear to his readers as possible, while still giving the reader much to ponder. It is the mark of a gifted historian (such as Bainton and Oberman were, and Daniell is) that he is able to draw on what is obviously a wealth of knowledge on the subject matter at hand, without making his readers feel stupid. Daniell's research and expertise can withstand the boldest criticism, but he is not there to boast. As Daniell shows, neither was Tyndale. Instead the goal is to teach, and Daniell teaches very well and also respects his student, the reader. Tyndale likewise had a heart for the unlearned many who were starving for the Word of God. As Daniell correctly observes, it is Tyndale, not Shakespeare, who has made the English language what it is today. Tyndale did this through the Greek and Hebrew of the Bible. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the English Bible, or history or religion in general. William Tyndale is perhaps the most important figure in Bible history, and especially relevant today amid the controversies raging over the King James Version (mostly Tyndale's work) and modern translations. Tyndale's faith will also challenge any reader to evaluate their own beliefs in light of the Bible. John Bunyan has been called 'The Living Bible.' Yet the same might also be said of Tyndale, who gave Bunyan, and the rest of us, our English Bible, at the cost of his own life.