Wilma Tenderfoot: The Case of the Frozen Hearts

( 6 )

Overview

"Nothing and nobody stops Wilma Tenderfoot!" (If she does say so herself.)

Wilma Tenderfoot, a tiny, brash, and determined ten-year-old orphan, dreams of becoming a worldfamous detective so she can find out who her parents are. Wilma discovers that her new next-door neighbor is the renowned detective Theodore P. Goodman, and he has a new case. Wilma is set on becoming Mr. Goodman's apprentice, so with the help of her beagle, Pickle, she makes deductions, follows leads, and scouts out suspects. She's sure she'll ...

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Overview

"Nothing and nobody stops Wilma Tenderfoot!" (If she does say so herself.)

Wilma Tenderfoot, a tiny, brash, and determined ten-year-old orphan, dreams of becoming a worldfamous detective so she can find out who her parents are. Wilma discovers that her new next-door neighbor is the renowned detective Theodore P. Goodman, and he has a new case. Wilma is set on becoming Mr. Goodman's apprentice, so with the help of her beagle, Pickle, she makes deductions, follows leads, and scouts out suspects. She's sure she'll win the famous detective over and crack the case, as soon as Pickle stops eating the clues.

With wicked humor, dastardly villains, red herrings, and a setting that would make Sherlock Holmes proud, this mystery is just like Wilma - funny, feisty, cheeky, and charming.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Raised on Cooper Island by the unpleasant Madam Skratch at the Lowside Institute for Woeful Children, 10-year-old orphan Wilma Tenderfoot remains determinedly optimistic, reading everything she can about her idol, island detective Theodore P. Goodman. "His noble deeds and intentions lifted Wilma from the drudgery of her everyday existence. How she longed to be a detective like him!" When she is sent off to be a servant to a woman named Mrs. Waldock ("Please feel free to beat her," reads the accompanying note from Madam Skratch), Wilma is delighted to make a friend (a dog named Pickle) and to discover that Goodman lives next door. She sets her heart on becoming his apprentice, despite his reluctance, and when an enormous gem disappears and people start turning up dead, they have a case. First published in the U.K., this first children's book from British author and TV personality Kennedy is characterized by an almost gleefully misanthropic sense of humor, offset by Wilma's enduring good spirits. The fast pace, suspenseful subplots, and gory details should please kids with a taste for wicked humor. Simultaneously available: The Case of the Putrid Poison. Ages 8–12. (Sept.)
Booklist

“Kennedy’s narrative is rambling and silly in the best possible way.”
Children's Literature - Larnette Snow
Wilma Tenderfoot is ten years old and lives in an orphanage on the wrong side of Cooper Island which is located somewhere between England and France. In order to discover who her parents are she wants to be a detective like Theodore P. Goodman and has memorized most of his cases and his "Ten Top Tips for Detecting." When Wilma is sent to Howling Hall to work for Mrs. Waldock for a thirty-day free trial period, she finds her best friend, a dog named Pickle. Her chores for Mrs. Waldock include running errands, plucking hairs from her chin, scraping scabs, and removing boogers. Her real adventures begin when she discovers that Detective Goodman lives next door to Howling Hall and she assigns herself on as his "unwanted" apprentice. Wilma is determined to solve his newest case: who has stolen the priceless Katzin Stone and why are the people connected to the stone dead with a frozen heart? Can she live up to the demands of Mrs. Waldock and solve the mystery? Or will she be returned to the Lowside Institute for Woeful Children before the case is solved? Children will want to read the entire book in order to find out. While reading the book, children can enjoy eating the island's favorite biscuit after baking them from the recipe included. Children are sure to cheer for Wilma as she avoids catastrophes with the island's numerous villains, including Madam Scratch from the orphanage. Reviewer: Larnette Snow
School Library Journal
Gr 3–6—This first book in the series is uneven and ultimately unsatisfying. Told through the perspective of a Snicket-esque third-person narrator, it begins the story of Wilma Tenderfoot, orphan and aspiring detective. When she's hired as a servant for bitter Mrs. Waldock, she gets the chance to fulfill her dreams: legendary detective Theodore P. Goodman lives next door. While he attempts to solve a mystery involving a stolen jewel and victims found with frozen hearts, Wilma willfully inserts herself into the case, sometimes finding clues and sometimes just getting into trouble. For much of the book, even young readers may sympathize with Goodman over Wilma. She is a bit plucky, too precocious, and her appearances can be a grating. The mystery itself is interesting and develops well as Goodman, and, in a parallel plot line, villainous Barbu D'Anvers, follow well-placed clues to discover the culprit. However, the resolution is weak, and the frozen hearts have little to do with the culprit or plot.—Heather Talty, formerly at Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School, New York City
Kirkus Reviews

Ten-year-old Wilma Tenderfoot, whose life's ambition is to be a great detective, finds an opportunity when the Katzin Stone is stolen and several people are murdered on tiny Cooper Island.

Sold from the Institute for Woeful Children to cantankerous Mrs. Waldock, foundling Wilma gets her chance when she discovers that Theodore P. Goodman, the island's greatest detective, lives next door. Ignoring her assigned tasks—muddying windows and scraping scabs—the determined child-investigator introduces herself, makes deductions, creeps after suspects, escapes circuitously and takes careful notes. She's joined in these activities by her new best friend, Pickle, a remarkably talented beagle who can fetch and carry messages and even make good detecting suggestions. This British import, the first of four already published in the UK, is full of hints about dire occurrences to come. At one point the author directly suggests that readers might want a hanky. The melodrama, outlandish invention and exaggerated humor will appeal to fans of Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events. Wilma is an appealing character, ever-hopeful that Goodman will take her on as an apprentice and help her find out more about her origins. The fast-paced plot twists and turns, but the conflict between good and evil is clear.

With plenty of loose ends for further installments, this is a promising beginning for a mystery series. (Mystery. 8-12)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803735408
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/15/2011
  • Series: Wilma Tenderfoot Series
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 1,005,572
  • Lexile: 890L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.76 (w) x 5.38 (h) x 1.18 (d)

Meet the Author

Emma Kennedy is an award-winning theater, movie, and TV comedy actress, and she also writes for television and radio in the United Kingdom. She lives in London England.

Gerald Guerlais is a freelance illustrator. He lives in France.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2011

    Go Wilma!!!

    Please write more stories. Great for all ages!!!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    Awesome

    This bbook was amazing.the plot,the scenes everything was so realistic except for the frozen hearts.it is not a good book for kids under 11 because there is much death before the half of the book.pickle is a loving character who is so hysterical while wilma is trying to become theodores apprentice.the flat blubby master of wilma is hilarious but also slightly gross.what i mean is the part where she tells wilma to fetch her spiders leg is utterly disgusting.it just needed a ting of humor but not that muchof humor.other than that this book has everything.from wilma being an orphanaged child trying to find her parents to the part where she is appointed apprenntice everything is so perfect and this book has everything needed to make a great book.this book has a mystery in which how te strange murder is released.u actually need to read the book twice to get the point.awesome.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2013

    Go girl(and her dog)

    Love this book SO much!!!!! And have read it a million times and can't wait to read the next 2 books

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2012

    Awesome book

    It is funny although it has some scary parts in the story like killing and just plain old scary,it is a funny book

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 15, 2012

    Not unless it's the only book you have!!!

    I think that this book was way to silly for the age group it was wrote for. It repeated itself way to many times. The idea was cute and it could have been a good book but in trying to be cute and diffrent it became silly and obnoxious. I mean how many times do you need to tell the reader that wilma is from the Lowside Institute for Woeful Children in the first chapter. Well Emma Kennedy felt like five. I wanted to well I did say out loud we get where Wilma is from and this was like the three time she felt compelled to tell me. Imagine by the fifth time. To me it feels like she is talking down to the reader. The Author in one area writes for very young kids younger than I think the book recommends, then she uses words like circuitous. Really?!? I mean when I was young I looked words up or ask my mom but the Author needs some help from the Editor.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

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