BN.com Gift Guide

Winchell: Gossip, Power, and the Culture of Celebrity

Overview

Hailed as the most important and entertaining biography in recent memory, Gabler's account of the life of fast-talking gossip columnist and radio broadcaster Walter Winchell "fuses meticulous research with a deft grasp of the cultural nuances of an era when virtually everyone who mattered paid homage to Winchell" (Time). of photos.

A sweeping, vital biography of Walter Winchell, the most powerful and, at times, the most feared journalist in the America of his day. ...

See more details below
Paperback
$16.76
BN.com price
(Save 32%)$25.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (33) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $14.63   
  • Used (26) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Hailed as the most important and entertaining biography in recent memory, Gabler's account of the life of fast-talking gossip columnist and radio broadcaster Walter Winchell "fuses meticulous research with a deft grasp of the cultural nuances of an era when virtually everyone who mattered paid homage to Winchell" (Time). of photos.

A sweeping, vital biography of Walter Winchell, the most powerful and, at times, the most feared journalist in the America of his day. Credited with the tabloiding of America, Winchell revealed who was cavorting with gangsters or chorus girls, who was engaging in financial shenanigans, and who was frolicking with whom. Photographs.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Inventor of the modern gossip column in the 1920s, pioneer in the mass culture of celebrity and a political opportunist who turned from populism to Red-baiting with the prevailing winds, Walter Winchell 1897-1972 changed 20th-century journalism and society, asserts Gabler An Empire of Their Own. His thorough biography stylishly tells of Winchell's tortured personal life and high-flying career. Born to Russian-Jewish immigrants in Harlem, Winchell drew on deprivation for his drive, which took him from vaudeville to writing Broadway gossip with a jaunty slang that matched ``the syncopated rhythm of the twenties.'' By the 1930s, he had become a ``journalistic entertainer'' on radio, on the stage and in movies; he helped establish the new, glamorous caf society. In 1934, he injected himself into the trial of Bruno Richard Hauptmann, who was eventually convicted of the kidnap-murder of the Lindbergh baby; he became a prominent New Deal supporter and a mouthpiece for the Roosevelt administration. After the war, however, Winchell foundered in both family and professional life; he fought his enemies in public feuds, and proved too hot for the ``cool'' medium of television. His radio broadcasts ended in 1959; his column, after 38 years of association with Hearst, in 1967. Winchell's legacy, Gabler notes, is today's mania for gossip. Photos. Film option to Martin Scorsese. Nov.
Library Journal
In the 1930s and 1940s, Walter Winchell was recognized as one of the most famous American journalists, while today his name stirs only vague memories. His life stands as a parable for the celebrity-conscious world of gossip that he helped create. In this fascinating biography, Gabler (An Empire of Their Own, LJ 11/1/88) intertwines Winchell's personal life, his professional development, and the growth of mass communication. Born in 1897, Winchell began his vaudeville career when he was 13. His early love of gossip about his fellow performers helped launch his journalism career. His gossip column became a key feature of the Hearst newspaper chain, and his radio program was listened to by millions, giving him enormous personal power. Winchell's fame was fleeting, like that of those he covered, and the power of gossip that he unleashed was turned on him. Gabler offers a reappraisal of Winchell's role in creating the celebrity culture that permeates American journalism today. His book belongs in most library collections. [Optioned by director Martin Scorsese.-Ed.]-Judy Solberg, Univ. of Maryland Libs., College Park
From Barnes & Noble
Despised by some, admired by others, journalist Walter Winchell was the first person to bring unabashed, sometimes malicious gossip into the public press. Reaching 50 million out of 75 million adult Americans, kingmaker Winchell created and destroyed celebrities with a mere mention in his daily column or his weekly radio broadcast. This brilliant biography recaptures Winchell's life and times and examines the very face of fame--how it is achieved and lost, what one gains from it, the terrible price it exacts, and why Americans are so obsessed with it. B&W photos.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679764397
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/28/1995
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 704
  • Sales rank: 487,014
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.49 (h) x 1.52 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2001

    Walter Winchell, a view from his tower of power

    I remember hearing Walter Winchell on the radio. What this book brings out is how Winchell came from poverty to a place where, according to Winchell, he was one of the most powerful men in America. Winchell, the book, is a time frame, the entertainers of the period, his anti-Nazi fervor and alliance with the likes of J.Edgar Hoover. The book follows him from the zenith to the skids where at the end, he was a caricture of himself. In the 1940's & 1950's, Winchell's voice meant the truth and nothing but the truth. Careers came and went by his words; column and radio.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)