The Wind Blows Backward

The Wind Blows Backward

4.9 87
by Mary Downing Hahn
     
 

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Lauren and Spencer share a love of poetry, and both have problems with their parents. But when Lauren realizes that she is falling in love with Spencer, she also begins to recognize his moody and self-destructive side.See more details below

Overview


Lauren and Spencer share a love of poetry, and both have problems with their parents. But when Lauren realizes that she is falling in love with Spencer, she also begins to recognize his moody and self-destructive side.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Easily read and enjoyed but also thoughtful: a book with unusual texture and depth." Kirkus Reviews with Pointers
School Library Journal
Gr 9-12-- High school seniors Lauren and Spencer cling to one other in an insensitive world peopled by affluent, snobbish classmates and preoccupied adults. They had been middle school misfits, bonded by braces and a love of fantasy and science fiction. But time, different lifestyles, and peer pressure interferred. He became the ``Prince of Jocks,'' while she remained an introverted loner. When he suddenly rekindles their friendship, Lauren is wary until she realizes that Spencer is deeply troubled and values the honesty and camaraderie they once shared. As their romance intensifies, he confides that he is haunted by his father's suicide and disturbed by his pretentious lifestyle and uncommunicative mother. Drunk and depressed on graduation night, he is nearly killed in a motorcycle accident. His physical, psychological, and emotional healing begins with devoted Lauren by his side. The couple confronts modern perils of youth--sex, alcohol, and suicide--with little adult intervention. Lauren's divorced mother is sympathetic but distracted by her own romantic involvement. Spencer's mother and stepfather are more concerned with social appearances than reality. Mr. Walker, their English teacher, dismisses the young man's poetic perception of death as plagiarism. Stereotype characters abound; and, the nearly tragic climax is a long time coming. Nonetheless, YA readers will identify with the pressures, conflicts, and concerns facing these teens. And, poetry fans will enjoy excerpts from Keats and Whitman. --Gerry Larson, Chewning Junior High School, Durham, NC
Stephanie Zvirin
Complete with its own dark, brooding hero, this is a story that teenage girls will fall for hook, line, and sinker. Characters are sensitively drawn, and the book is full of coming-of-age angst and romance. But it's also so predictable that it's only Hahn's rich, occasionally inspired prose that saves it from becoming mournfully melodramatic. Now a senior in high school, Lauren thinks she's gotten over her middle-school crush, Spencer Adams, who's virtually ignored her for the last few years. Yet, when he approaches her in the library, memories of the books and dreams they'd shared flood back, and it isn't long before he's in her life again. But despite her romantic haze, Lauren knows that Spencer's changed: his grades have plummeted, his relationships with his mother and stepfather are troubled at best, his behavior is erratic, and he seems overly preoccupied with death. Through measured scenes that demonstrate Spencer's downward emotional spiral and the depth of Lauren's commitment (the two eventually become sexually intimate), Hahn evokes a fantasy love gone awry and shows clearly that while loving deeply and truly may be wonderful, it's not always enough.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395629758
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/28/1993
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.93(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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From the Publisher
"Easily read and enjoyed but also thoughtful: a book with unusual texture and depth." Kirkus Reviews with Pointers

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