The Wind in the Willows

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Overview

Kenneth Grahame's exuberant yet whimsical The Wind in the Willows belongs to the golden age of children's classic novels. These charming, exciting and humorous tales of the riverbank and its life featuring the wonderfully imagined Ratty, Mole, Badger and the irrepressible but conceited Toad of Toad Hall — whose passion for motor cars ("The only way to travel! Here today — in next week tomorrow") lands him in many scrapes — still continue exert ...
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The Wind in The Willows (Collins Classics)

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Overview

Kenneth Grahame's exuberant yet whimsical The Wind in the Willows belongs to the golden age of children's classic novels. These charming, exciting and humorous tales of the riverbank and its life featuring the wonderfully imagined Ratty, Mole, Badger and the irrepressible but conceited Toad of Toad Hall — whose passion for motor cars ("The only way to travel! Here today — in next week tomorrow") lands him in many scrapes — still continue exert their charm over adults as well as children.

Kenneth Grahame was born in Edinburgh in 1859. He was educated at St Edward's School, Oxford but because of family circumstances he was unable to enter Oxford University. He joined the Bank of England as a gentleman clerk in 1879, rising to become Secretary to the Bank in 1898. He wrote a series of short stories published in such collections as The Golden Age (1895) and Dream Days (1898). These featured a fictional family of five children. In 1899 he married Elspeth Thomson and their only child, Alistair, was born a year later. He left the Bank in 1908 on health grounds. The same year, The Wind in the Willows was published. The book was not an immediate success, and he never attempted to write fiction again. However, the popularity of the novel grew steadily and by the time of Grahame's death in 1932 it was recognized as a children's classic.

This edition, illustrated by Michael Foreman, adds some noteworthy extras: the unabridged text includes two chapters that don't appear in some modern versions: "The Pipers at the Gates of Dawn" and "Wayfarers All". The book closes with reproductions of two of Grahame's actual letters to his son Alistair ("My darling Mouse") in 1907, written on ornate, old-timey stationery from two Cornwall hotels and recounting one of Toad's first adventures.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Inga Moore's illustrations lend a luminous air to the tale of Mole, Mr. Toad, Badger and Rat in Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows, abridged by Moore. She uses delicate pen-and-ink drawings and watercolor wash to convey framed images of cobblestone streets, spot illustrations of Badger's welcoming hearth and wide framed expanses of the countryside. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
City Parent
Lavishly illustrated.
Children's Literature
Many a memorable night will be spent reading pages from this beautiful abridged edition of an English classic. First published individually in 1996, this edition contains 9 chapters of stories of the riverbank friends of Mr. Moles, Mr. Badger, Water Rat and Mr. Toad, the creatures created in stories at the turn of the century by Mr. Grahame for his young son. It is the world seen through the eyes of these four friends, a world so innocent yet interesting. Children and parents alike will be mesmerized by the nostalgic illustrations done in the English storybook tradition. Young children so often identify more easily with animal characters rather than human characters, and the magical adventures of these four will bring hours of enjoyment. The characters are wonderfully drawn using text that seems almost poetic. This lovely book is sure to become a family favorite. 2003, Candlewick, Ages 3 to 8.
— Meredith Kiger, Ph.D.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
If you haven't read this book aloud to your kids yet, get the seventy-fifth anniversary edition and introduce them to Toad, Mole, Ratty and Badger. Share the pictures with them, which include black-and-white sketches as well as full color plates. These are the only illustrations that were directly influenced by Grahame who entertained Shepard at his country home. They resonate with the stories. There are lessons to be learned and lots of laughs. It's a book that can be read and reread with messages that will be understood at different ages and stages of life. 1983 (orig.
Library Journal
How would one describe this latest recording of the classic story from Alcott (Little Men, Audio Reviews, LJ 11/15/96)? The answer must be, clear, competent, and unexciting. Laura Grafton is a precise reader, but her voice lacks expressiveness, and she makes little attempt to vocally differentiate (and/or animate) the characters. The result is an inoffensive and slightly dull rendering. There's nothing wrong; the tapes just won't grab the attention of the casual listener. The producer has made a praiseworthy attempt to reduce costs by having each cassette side carry double text. At $22.95, this tape set is an excellent value. Unfortunately, this double-track format requires a stereo cassette player with a fully functioning balance control. Most portable cassette players and some car stereo systems do not have this feature. Since, at least anecdotally, a large percentage of recreational audiocassette library borrowers are commuters or exercisers, one should consider whether this format would be used by patrons. Libraries purchasing this format might also consider purchasing (and lending) the associated headphone adaptor plugs. Recommended for libraries with limited audiobook budgets and/or appropriate user populations.--I. Pour-El, Iowa State Univ., Ames
Library Journal

Originally published in France in 1996, this edition collects the four corresponding English-language volumes that were first issued between 1997 and 2002 by NBM. Plessix's style has been called "detailed impressionism," and the limpid watercolors of his lavish adaptation give that "Somewhere Else" quality to the classic story-2008 is the 100th anniversary of Graham's novel. So many adaptations have so little space to work in that they seem more like CliffsNotes versions. But Plessix has truly adapted the tale with most of the narrative details intact-and a few new twists at the end. And while the anthropomorphic animal characters have a cute, cartoony quality, the overall effect of a timeless, golden world is not thereby disrupted; all the looniness and love of nature from the original come through beautifully. Somehow the world of Mole and his friends suggests an animal Hobbiton in a Ring-less alternative universe, where talking animals and humans coexist amid a gloriously bucolic world of water, woods, and fields based on preindustrial rural England. Unfortunately, the pages are a little too small to showcase the details of Plessix's lush art as it deserves. For all ages.
—Martha Cornog

School Library Journal
Gr 3-7-The considerable talents of narrator Martin Jarvis and pleasant snippets of classical music almost redeem this abridged presentation of Kenneth Grahames whimsical classic. The story revolves around the misadventures of Mole who embarks on a haphazard river journey with the proud Rat who loves "messing about in boats." These mismatched pals encounter the wise, elusive Badger and the crude, greedy, accident prone Mr. Toad. Jarvis has a ball playing these unforgettable characters, portraying Mole with just the right amount of naivete, Rat with dashing confidence, Badger with effective gruffness, and Toad with jubilant wackiness. He does such a beautiful job capturing the story's humor and language that listeners will wish that this was an unabridged presentation. Although the scenes flow for the most part, the abridgement causes some awkward moments. For example, the narrator says that a character utters "Oh my oh my oh my" for a second time, but the character's first utterance of these words have been cut. Many sections that dramatize the developing tensions between the characters have been snipped, and certain sentences seem to have been cut for no good reason. This of course goes against what Kenneth Grahame envisioned when he wrote this strange, poetic allegory. For libraries interested in purchasing abridged audiobooks, this version of The Wind in the Willows benefits from a talented narrator. However, others may wish to consider Recorded Books' more definitive unabridged presentation, read by the wonderful Flo Gibson.-Brian E. Wilson, Evanston Public Library, IL Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Carolyn Phelan
In spirit, in style, and in technique, Benson's illustrations for "The Wind in the Willows" are first cousins to the book's original ink drawings by Ernest H. Shepard, which many consider so nearly perfect any new artwork is superfluous. However, from the endpaper maps to the quiet scenes of woods and riverbanks to the comical pictures of Toad's adventures, Benson's sensitive cross-hatched drawings offer excellent interpretations of characters and events. The best choice for any library would be to add this to the collection and let children choose the version that suits them. If they come across the other editions later, it will be like looking through a cousin's photos of a long-ago family reunion: so familiar and so full of beloved characters, yet seen from a slightly different perspective. Any way you look at it, this new edition will be treasured.
The Virginian-Pilot
A handsome new hardcover.
From the Publisher
 • "It is a book that breaks nearly every rule of modern children's fiction... it wasn't about fairies at the bottom of the garden, but it was about magic — just the right kind of magic. It thrills me still to read it." —Shirley Hughes, The Times
Children's Literature - Lois Rubin Gross
Some books are classics for a short time, limited by characterization or the technology they feature (think the original UNIVAC computer in A Wrinkle in Time). And some books are classic and ageless. So it is with Kenneth Grahame's fantasy of small, anthropomorphized woodland creatures having great adventures against the background of Victorian England. The book has gone through numerous incarnations with famous illustrators including Bransom, Rackham, and Hague. There are annotated versions and abridged versions. Most people meet Mr. Toad of Toad Hall when a beloved teacher makes the book the subject of special, shared reading time in first grade. However, David Roberts' gift-intended tome creates an abridged version with illustrations suitable for a younger group of readers. His digital drawings of Toad, Mole, and Badger have whimsical personalities that will reach out to young readers. The characters appear frequently throughout the text, rather than the few, scattered drawings in older versions. Color saturated pages bring the Wild Wood, Toad Hall, and the riverbank vividly to life. Toad dressed as a runaway washerwoman is a delight, as is a page of Christmas caroling mice with lovely long tails and nearly textured red scarves. The historically cumbersome chapter about the god, Pan, is deleted, but Roberts has made a point of secreting images of Pan in his illustrations throughout the book. If you are looking for classic representations of this timeless book or, heaven forbid, the Disney version, this is not it. This is a rendition with a contemporary feel that will introduce the beloved characters to an extended audience, and the elegant language of the original Grahame story is not sacrificed. The final rendition of Mole and Toad literally walking into the sunset with arms wrapped around each other is a fitting close to a delightful and colorful escapade. Reviewer: Lois Rubin Gross
School Library Journal
01/01/2014
Gr 1–4—Grahame's early-20th-century classic is enhanced by lovely watercolor illustrations that provide a contemporary and packed-with-charisma accompaniment. The anthropomorphized characters, all fashionably turned out in Edwardian costume, are vivified with expressive facial features and twinkling eyes. Detailed settings range from Ratty's cozy and colorfully decorated waterside home to the elegant grandeur of Toad Hall to Mole's understated tunnel-shaped abode. The beautifully composed outdoor scenes sparkle with season-appropriate hues: a springtime rowing jaunt down a sunlit river is framed by trailing willow trees, and a wintertime excursion into the Wild Wood is evoked with lavender skies, intertwined tree barks in swirling grays, and an overlay of heavy white snowflakes. In addition to the geometric drawings that embellish each chapter title, designs made from bold shapes and bright constrasting colors appear throughout, adding an Art Deco flair. Ranging from small vignettes to full-bleed double pages, the artwork embellishes almost every spread, engaging independent readers and reeling in younger listeners with entertaining antics, gentle humor, and genial affection.—Joy Fleishhacker, School Library Journal
Kirkus Reviews
2013-08-15
Many famous artists have interpreted the antics and adventures of Mole, Ratty, Toad and Badger. Roberts takes a decidedly modern approach in this gift edition sure to appeal to another generation of readers. From the glimmer of silver-foiled lettering on the front cover to the full-color illustrations liberally dispersed throughout, readers of all ages can fully immerse themselves in Grahame's settings. Images executed in watercolor, ink, pen and pencil perfectly convey the postures of a distraught Mole or a momentarily contrite Toad, while the backgrounds impress with a range of seasons and circumstances. Washes of a dominant color are given fine details and highlights with touches of contrasting color, as when cool, frosty blues give way to a circle of white that glows around a young mouse choir, all snuggled in their vibrant orange-red scarves, as they sing carols. Humor abounds. Giggles will erupt at the picture of Toad alarmed and upside down, with the birds at the bottom of the page and the grassy bank slanting at the top. The variety of full-page, double-page and spot illustrations keeps the experience lively. Although purists may quibble at the omission of the chapter "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn," those new to the book will not miss it (but may inquire who the mischievous boy--the Greek god Pan--is that appears on a few pages). All told, an elegantly designed volume ready to take its rightful place on any child's bookshelf. (Fantasy. All ages)
From Barnes & Noble
This classic children's story features the adventures of timid Mole, cheerful Rat, reclusive Badger, and boastful Toad. Read as an allegory or a paean to the joys of friendship, here is a timeless tale well told.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781584721536
  • Publisher: Sound Room Publishers, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/1/2002
  • Edition description: Unabridged

Meet the Author

Kenneth Grahame (1859–1932) was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, the third of four children. When he was five, his mother died, and his father sent the children to live with relatives in England. Kindly treated yet emotionally isolated, the Grahame children constructed a world of childhood pleasures. Although Kenneth left that world at the age of nine when he went to St. Edward’s School, its memory remained alive, even when he found no equal happiness in his adult life. Lack of funds ended his dream of attending Oxford and forced him to take a position with the Bank of England, where he had a successful career. In 1891, he anonymously published the first of his evocations of childhood, The Olympians, in The National Observer. The Golden Age (1895) and Dream Days (1898) established his fame. The Wind in the Willows, written to entertain his son, Alastair, was published in 1908. He wrote little thereafter, spending his remaining years in extensive traveling and in final retreat to the tranquility of the English countryside.

Luanne Rice is the New York Times bestselling author of more than thirty novels, including The Lemon Orchard, Summer of Roses, Silver Bells, and Beach Girls. Her books have inspired television movies on TNT, CBS, and Hallmark Hall of Fame and a six-hour miniseries on Lifetime. She lives in New York City and Southern California.

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Read an Excerpt

Playing Pilgrims


"Christmas won't be Christmas without any presents,"grumbled Jo, lying on the rug.

"It's so dreadful to be poor!"sighed Meg, looking down at her old dress.

"I don't think it's fair for some girls to have lots of pretty things, and other girls nothing at all," added little Amy, with an injured sniff.

"We've got father and mother, and each other, anyhow,"said Beth, contentedly, from her corner.

The four young faces on which the firelight shone brightened at the cheerful words, but darkened again as Jo said sadly?

"We haven't got father, and shall not have him for a long time." She didn't say "perhaps never,"but each silently added it, thinking of father far away, where the fighting was.

Nobody spoke for a minute; then Meg said in an altered tone, "You know the reason mother proposed not having any presents this Christmas, was because it's going to be a hard winter for every one; and she thinks we ought not to spend money for pleasure, when our men are suffering so in the army. We can't do much, but we can make our little sacrifices, and ought to do it gladly. But I am afraid I don't;"and Megshook her head, as she thought regretfully of all the pretty things she wanted.

"But I don't think the little we should spend would do any good. We've each got a dollar, and the army wouldn't be much helped by our giving that. I agree not to expect anything from mother or you, but I do want to buy Undine and Sintram for myself; I've wanted it so long,'said Jo, who was a bookworm.

"I planned to spend mine in new music,"said Beth, with a little sigh, which no one heard but the hearth-brush andkettle-holder.

"I shall get a nice box of Faber's drawing pencils; I really need them," said Amy, decidedly.

"Mother didn't say anything about our money, and she won't wish us to give up everything. Let's each buy what we want, and have a little fun; I'm sure we grub hard enough to earn it,"cried Jo, examining the heels of her
boots in a gentlemanly manner.

"I know I do, teaching those dreadful children nearly all day, when I'm longing to enjoy myself at home," began Meg, in the complaining tone again.

"You don't have half such a hard time as I do," said Jo. "How would you like to be shut up for hours with a nervous, fussy old lady, who keeps you trotting, is never satisfied, and worries you till you''e ready to fly out of the window or box her ears?"

"It's naughty to fret, but I do think washing dishes and keeping things tidy is the worst work in the world. It makes me cross; and my hands get so stiff, I can't practise good a bit." And Beth looked at her rough hands with a sigh that any one could hear that time.

"I don't believe any of you suffer as I do," cried Amy; "for you don't have to go to school with impertinent girls, who plague you if you don't know your lessons, and laugh at your dresses, and label your father if he isn't rich, and insult you when your nose isn't nice."

"If you mean libel I'd say so, and not talk about labels, as if pa was a pickle-bottle," advised Jo, laughing.

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Table of Contents

Foreword ix
Chapter 1 The River Bank 1
Chapter 2 The Open Road 25
Chapter 3 The Wild Wood 48
Chapter 4 Mr. Badger 70
Chapter 5 Dulce Domum 94
Chapter 6 Mr. Toad 121
Chapter 7 The Piper at the Gates of Dawn 146
Chapter 8 Toad's Adventures 165
Chapter 9 Wayfarers All 191
Chapter 10 The Further Adventures of Toad 221
Chapter 11 'Like Summer Tempests Came His Tears' 250
Chapter 12 The Return of Ulysses 281
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First Chapter

The Wind in the Willows Book and Charm

Chapter One

The Mole had been working very hard all the morning, spring cleaning his little home. First with brooms, then with dusters; then on ladders and steps and chairs, with a brush and a pail of whitewash; till he had dust in his throat and eyes, and splashes of whitewash all over his black fur, and an aching back and weary arms. Spring was moving in the air above and in the earth below and around him, penetrating even his dark and lowly little house with its spirit of divine discontent and longing. It was small wonder, then, that he suddenly flung down his brush on the floor, said "Bother!" and "O blow!" and also "Hang spring cleaning!" and bolted out of the house without even waiting to put on his coat. Something up above was calling him imperiously, and he made for the steep little tunnel which answered in his case to the graveled carriage-drive owned by animals whose residences are nearer to the sun and air. So he scraped and scratched and scrabbled and scrooged and then he scrooged again and scrabbled and scratched and scraped, working busily with his little paws and muttering to himself, "Up we go! Up we go!" till at last, pop! his snout came out into the sunlight, and he found himself rolling in the warm grass of a great meadow.

"This is fine!" he said to himself. "This is better than whitewashing!" The sunshine struck hot on his fur, soft breezes caressed his heated brow, and after the seclusion of the cellarage he had lived in so long the carol of happy birds fell on his dulled hearing almost like a shout. Jumping off all his four legs at once, in the joy of living and the delight of spring without its cleaning, he pursued his way across the meadow till he reached the hedge on the further side.

"Hold up!" said an elderly rabbit at the gap. "Sixpence for the privilege of passing by the private road!" He was bowled over in an instant by the impatient and contemptuous Mole, who trotted along the side of the hedge chaffing the other rabbits as they peeped hurriedly from their holes to see what the row was about. "Onion sauce! Onion sauce!" he remarked jeeringly, and was gone before they could think of a thoroughly satisfactory reply. Then they all started grumbling at each other. "How stupid you are! Why didn't you tell him--" "Well, why didn't you say--" "You might have reminded him--" and so on, in the usual way; but, of course, it was then much too late, as is always the case.

It all seemed too good to be true. Hither and thither through the meadows he rambled busily, along the hedgerows, across the copses, finding everywhere birds building, flowers budding, leaves thrusting -- everything happy, and progressive, and occupied. And instead of having an uneasy conscience pricking him and whispering, "Whitewash!" he somehow could only feel how jolly it was to be the only idle dog among all these busy citizens. After all, the best part of a holiday is perhaps not so much to be resting yourself, as to see all the other fellows busy working.

He thought his happiness was complete when, as he meandered aimlessly along, suddenly he stood by the edge of a full-fed river. Never in his life had he seen a river before -- this sleek, sinuous, full-bodied animal, chasing and chuckling, gripping things with a gurgle and leaving them with a laugh, to fling itself on fresh playmates that shook themselves free, and were caught and held again. All was a-shake and a-shiver -- glints and gleams and sparkles, rustle and swirl, chatter and bubble. The Mole was bewitched, entranced, fascinated. By the side of the river he trotted as one trots, when very small, by the side of a man who holds one spellbound by exciting stories; and when tired at last, he sat on the bank, while the river still chattered on to him, a babbling procession of the best stories in the world, sent from the heart of the earth to be told at last to the insatiable sea.

As he sat on the grass and looked across the river, a dark hole in the bank opposite, just above the water's edge, caught his eye, and dreamily he fell to considering what a nice snug dwelling place it would make for an animal with few wants and fond of a bijou riverside residence, above flood level and remote from noise and dust. As he gazed, something bright and small seemed to twinkle down in the heart of it, vanished, then twinkled once more like a tiny star. But it could hardly be a star in such an unlikely situation; and it was too glittering and small for a glowworm. Then, as he looked, it winked at him, and so declared itself to be an eye; and a small face began gradually to grow up round it, like a frame round a picture.

A brown little face, with whiskers.

A grave round face, with the same twinkle in its eye that had first attracted his notice.

Small neat ears and thick silky hair.

It was the Water Rat!

Then the two animals stood and regarded each other cautiously.

"Hullo, Mole!" said the Water Rat.

"Hullo, Rat!" said the Mole.

"Would you like to come over?" inquired the Rat presently.

"Oh, it's all very well to talk," said the Mole, rather pettishly, he being new to a river and riverside life and its ways.

The Rat said nothing, but stooped and unfastened a rope and hauled on it; then lightly stepped into a little boat which the Mole had not observed. It was painted blue outside and white within, and was just the size for two animals; and the Mole's whole heart went out to it at once, even though he did not yet fully understand its uses ...

The Wind in the Willows Book and Charm. Copyright © by Kenneth Grahame. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 145 )
Rating Distribution

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(93)

4 Star

(28)

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(14)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 146 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2009

    wind in the willows

    I was disappointed when I got it home to find it had been abridged- the language simplified. I kept it for the illustrations but was very disappointed in the simplified style.

    15 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2011

    Read this book to a child!

    I have come to this book for the first time very late. I was swept away by it. This is a children's book only in that it is meant to be read *to* children, not read by them. The vocabulary and sentence structure is out of reach for most young readers, but the rhythmic flow and loveliness of the prose cries to be read aloud. Find a child, cuddle up on the nearest sofa, and read. The story and characters are enough to entrance a child. The prose will entrance the adult.

    12 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Read it on my nook

    I got this book on my nook.Its alot better then the hard cover or paper back.You can find the meaning of a word so much faster.Being only 12 this was a great help.

    7 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2000

    A Great Book

    The book called The Wind in the Willows is about animals named: Water Rat, Mole, Badger, and Mr. Toad. In this book, Mr. Toad gets hooked on driving motor cars. He crashes them each time and gets hurt, but he still buys more and more. Water Rat, Mole, and Badger all try to stop him from this craze that Mr. Toad had brought on himself. They were finally able to stop him and set him straight by keeping him in Toad Hall and watching over him so he could get out and buy more motor cars. Right after they did that, the bad, mean weasels that came from the Wild Wood invaded Toad Hall. The animals all set up a plan to attack them in order to get Toad Hall back¿Will they get Toad Hall back or not? Read the book called The Wind in the Willows written by Kenneth Grahame to find out. I liked this book because it had some adventure tied into it. it also had good friendships between the animals in it. It showed how friends should act towards each other. I would recommend this book for anyone who likes to read a good story with happiness and friendships.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    Soo good

    This is a must read. It is so good i totally recommened it

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2011

    A must have book

    This book is my favorite all time "children's" book... the language and wording is definitely a bit beyond the vocabulary and understanding of modern children, but a great one to read aloud. Some of my favorite memories of childhood involve sitting on my mother's lap when she read this book. It is full of dreaminess and imagination - definitely go with an illustrated copy. The picture just make it that much better.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    the wind in the willows.

    the wind in the willows was great!! i love animal stories so i liked this book a lot. also the characters had a lot of personality and i liked reading about Toad and Mole and Ratty and their adventures! except there were still some hard words that i couldn't figure out like sixpence and tranquility. also sometimes i was completely LOST because kenneth grahame used a looooottt of description!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 16, 2012

    A Classic for both Children and Adults

    This was one of my favorite books when I was a child. My children also loved it. Now I'm reading it to my young grandchildren and they are loving it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 28, 2012

    Good edition for the money

    This edition of the classic is full of black and white illustrations by Ernest H. Shepard which are spaced at good intervals to keep kids interested as you read. I am quite pleased with it. As to the tale, well, it remains my one of my children's (ages 37 & 34) favorites and we are now introducing it to our twin grandsons (age 6) whose response has been very warm and favorable. We live on west coast and they on east coast and this is a book we've chosen to use for Skype video chats. We read a paragraph, then one of them of their father reads the next. We bought the beautiful annotated version of The Wind in the Willows for them. It, however, has most of its pictures in a center section. That section has illustrations from many, many editions, but these are not spaced throughout the story. By the way, we've used this tandem reading via video chat with other books, including O'Sullivan Stew and Shrek. We've ALL enjoyed it and it, of course, keeps us in the loop a bit better despite the distance between us.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    Good

    Fantastic storyline- has some curse words in it, not highly recomended for small children.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2013

    I thought this book was very good! I usually don't like these ty

    I thought this book was very good! I usually don't like these types of book, but I really enjoyed it.
    I think the author, Kenneth Grahame wrote this book well.
    I also think that you would have to have a big imagination to write something like this, and he had one.
    Overall it surprised me how much I like this book. i would definitely read it again.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2012

    GREAT BOOK

    This book is off the hook.This on my wishlest.LOVE.IT.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2012

    Definetly read it

    A sweet, touching classic full of simplicity and innocence and the true value of friendship.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2012

    Anonymous on anonymous

    It was an ok read not one of the bests but it was kind of good

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2000

    BOOK GETS 5 STARS

    THIS WAS A VERY GOOD BOOK.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2013

    Like

    This book is good....!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    Slash

    She leaves heading home.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2013

    Shadow

    Watches slightly amuzed.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    Loathe

    Growls and rips scales from her wings. I stabbed her in the foreleg and ripped up exposing bone and tissue. "Tell him.."

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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