The Window

The Window

4.8 8
by Jeanette Ingold
     
 

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Mandy survived the terrible accident that killed her mother, but she was left blind and alone. Now she lives with relatives she doesn't know, attends a new school, and tries to make friends--all the while struggling to function without sight.
Her unpredictable life takes its strangest turn when she begins to hear the oddest things through the window of her

Overview


Mandy survived the terrible accident that killed her mother, but she was left blind and alone. Now she lives with relatives she doesn't know, attends a new school, and tries to make friends--all the while struggling to function without sight.
Her unpredictable life takes its strangest turn when she begins to hear the oddest things through the window of her attic room. In fact, what she hears--and seems to "see"--are events that happened years ago, before she was even born. . . .

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A sensitive and well-told story, inhabited by appealing and believable characters."--Kirkus Reviews

"[Teens] will enjoy this well-written, realistic story."--VOYA

"A strong and satisfying work."--Booklist

Children's Literature - Sherri Byrand
Fifteen-year-old Mandy has a lot to cope with-blinded by the car accident that killed her mother, she must deal with her grief, go to live with the great aunt and uncles she never knew, adjust to a new school and new way of learning, and face ghosts, both real and imagined. All this leaves the author with a lot to cope with, but Ingold does more than cope: she intertwines each subplot into a charming tapestry of love, friendship, recovery, and mysteries solved. As Mandy discovers the strength to live with her blindness while developing a healthy interdependence with friends and family, the readers will be sure to discover a new character to care about. The book's narration is beautifully handled through Mandy. Thus, with the exception of the ghost segments-where Mandy can actually see her grandmother as a young woman-the reader experiences the world from Mandy's point of view, only through sounds, scents, and touch. In the hands of a lesser writer, the ghost subplot would have been a second-rate diversion, but here it is an enchanting development, one that helps Mandy as she comes to terms with the skeletons in her family's closet.
Kirkus Reviews
After the car accident that leaves her blind and kills her mother, Mandy, 15, goes to live with her elderly great-aunt and uncles in Texas. Coping with her grief, blindness, a new school in a new town, and relatives she didn't know existed makes Mandy resentful and angry. Enter Hannah, a classmate assigned to guide Mandy around the building for the first few days, who refuses to tolerate Mandy's self-pity and draws her into normal school and social activities. Mandy also meets Ted, who is deaf, in one of the special classes she takes, and he becomes a friend and more. In addition to settling in at school, Mandy has found that, through her bedroom window, she can "see" her family's unhappy past, gaining an understanding of her guardians, her beloved mother, and the father she never knew. This is a sensitive and well-told story, inhabited by appealing and believable characters, and given a twist by the unexpected element of the supernatural. That element, however, doesn't steal the story's credibility; the scenes outside the window are carried to a wistful, grieving Mandy like whispers on the wind.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152049263
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
08/01/2003
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
4.50(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
780L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author


JEANETTE INGOLD is the author of several acclaimed novels, including Pictures, 1918 and Airfield. She lives and writes in Montana.

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Window 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
ponywriter7 More than 1 year ago
Imagine suddenly losing your eye sight and your only parent at the same moment. Now imagine being thrown into a new world with relatives you’ve never met, in a town you have never seen, and in a school where the faculty are learning how to deal with a blind person at the same time you are trying to learn how to use your cane. Jeanette Ingold wrote this book with such depth, I was caught up in the story instantly. This isn’t a “feel-sorry-for-me” book, this is a story about a frightened girl whose background has given her courage to navigate her way through a new world, against tremendous odds, while discovering secrets about her family’s past through the only visions available to her ~ those of her ancestors she glimpses out the window of her attic bedroom. A wonderful story. Read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think I've read this book over a hundred times...Its amazing what she overcame and came to terms with just by seeing what the grandmother she never met went through to find herself and where she really belongs. This one of the best books that I've ever read and I will keep reading it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book has opened my eyes a whole lot. It shows me that I shouldn't let anything push me down. Mary is a wonderful girl who has inspired me to say hi to people with dissabilities because they are just like me but with some larger obstacles.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book was so wonderful. the way she copes with her sight and her mothers death is so great. she brings the past to life and show us that anything is possible.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Window is a wonderful book that teaches you about disabilities and how to cope with new friends, families, putbacks, and love. I would recomend this to anyone who likes a good book to read. Easy to read and understand. Very detailed. You feel like you are actually Mandy in the story. A great book. Read it!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book makes you really think about the life of an adopted mother that never really knew about family, and love. Her daughter is left blinded after a car accident, in which the mother dies. The girl is reunited with the family she never knew about. She is able to help a close friend dealing with similar, but very different problems, while overcoming her own problems that she never understood. There is still more a twist to this book. Everything in this book ties together so neatly and so realistic. I recommend this book to all.