Windows 7 for XP Professionals: Essential Planning and Support for the IT Pro

Overview


Windows 7 will be the successor to Windows XP for most organizations running Windows clients. What can system administrators expect when upgrading to the new operating system? What are the most important differences for the IT pro, and how does all this new technology work? This book has the answers—clear, simple, and to the point. The subjects in this book focus on real-world experience; giving you the technical information you need without the marketing chat. Windows 7 for XP Professionals benefits IT ...
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Overview


Windows 7 will be the successor to Windows XP for most organizations running Windows clients. What can system administrators expect when upgrading to the new operating system? What are the most important differences for the IT pro, and how does all this new technology work? This book has the answers—clear, simple, and to the point. The subjects in this book focus on real-world experience; giving you the technical information you need without the marketing chat. Windows 7 for XP Professionals benefits IT professionals who are responsible for setting up and maintaining medium- to large-sized networks. The book contains an in-depth overview of the essential changes since Windows XP in terms of deploying, managing, securing, and migrating to Windows 7. The new version of Windows offers unprecedented opportunities and challenges. Let Windows 7 for XP Professionals help make your migration seamless.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789072389046
  • Publisher: Books4brains
  • Publication date: 11/16/2009
  • Pages: 366
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author


Raymond Comvalius is an independent consultant and trainer from the Netherlands. Since 1996 he has developed and implemented network infrastructures based on various Microsoft products at business and governmental sites. He recently played a significant role in designing the new Windows Vista-based desktop for a large Netherlands bank. Since 1998, he has been training and presenting a wide range of infrastructure and security-related courses. He regularly publishes articles on the Internet.
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Table of Contents

1 Introduction l

1.1 Online resources and contacting the author 2

2 Introducing Windows 7 3

2.1 A summary of nondiscussed new features 3

2.2 Windows 7 editions 5

2.3 Using multiple languages 9

2.4 SuperFetch and ReadyBoost 10

2.4.1 SuperFetch 10

2.4.2 ReadyBoost 10

2.5 32- or 64-bit Windows on the client 13

2.6 Windows libraries 16

2.7 Federated Search 18

2.8 Problem Steps Recorder 19

3 Deploying Windows 7 21

3.1 Windows product activation 22

3.1.1 License states 22

3.1.2 Retail Activation 24

3.1.3 OEM Activation 24

3.1.4 Volume Activation 2.0 25

3.1.5 Multiple Activation Key (MAK) 25

3.1.6 Key Management Server (KMS) 26

3.1.7 Licensing overview 28

3.2 Windows 7 installation basics 29

3.2.1 Windows 7 disk partitioning 30

3.2.2 Installation passes 30

3.3 Windows installation tools 33

3.3.1 ImageX 33

3.3.2 DISM 34

3.3.3 Windows System Image Management (WSIM) 35

3.3.4 DiskPart 37

3.3.5 Sysprep 37

3.3.6 BcdEdit 38

3.3.7 Bcdboot 38

3.3.8 Oscdimg 38

3.4 Windows image management 40

3.4.1 Accessing and maintaining WIM files 40

3.4.2 Accessing and maintaining VHD files 47

3.4.3 Installing Windows to boot from a VHD 50

3.5 Automating Windows Setup 51

3.5.1 Windows 7 answer files 51

3.5.2 Catalog files 51

3.5.3 Using Windows System Image Manager 52

3.5.4 Common WSIM scenarios 54

3.5.5 Adding files, packages and drivers 55

3.5.6 Adding scripts 58

3.5.7 Adding drivers 60

3.5.8 Apply the answer file 61

3.5.9 Unattended setup 63

3.5.10 Sensitive data in answer files 65

3.5.11 Troubleshooting unattended setup 66

3.6 Image servicing 68

3.6.1 Managing features 68

3.6.2 Managing device drivers 71

3.6.3Managing Windows editions 75

3.6.4 Managing languages and language packs 77

3.6.5 Offline domain join 78

3.7 Customizing Windows setup 81

3.7.1 Windows Welcome 81

3.7.2 Customizing the desktop 89

3.7.3 Customizing the Start menu 95

3.7.4 Internet Explorer$ 97

3.7.5 Other customization 97

3.8 Windows PE 99

3.8.1 What does Windows PE do and not do 99

3.8.2 Windows PE architecture and system requirements 100

3.8.3 Windows PE boot process 101

3.8.4 Building a custom Windows PE image 102

3.8.5 Booting Windows PE from a USB stick 105

3.8.6 Booting Windows PE from CD-ROM 106

3.8.7 Booting a locally stored WIM file 107

3.9 Windows Deployment Services 108

3.9.1 What's new in Windows Deployment Services 108

3.9.2 Prerequisites for running WDS 108

3.9.3 Installing Windows Deployment services 108

3.9.4 WDS modes 109

3.9.5 WDS image types 109

3.9.6 Configuring Windows Deployment Server 110

3.10 Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 115

3.10.1 Building an MDT development lab 115

3.10.2 Installing Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 116

3.10.3 Getting started with MDT 116

3.10.4 Creating a distribution share 117

3.10.5 Exploring the distribution share 119

3.10.6 Generating the automated deployment 123

4 Managing Windows 7 125

4.1 Managing the boot menu 125

4.1.1 How to modify the BCD 125

4.1.2 Using BcdEdit 126

4.2 Power management 130

4.2.1 Power Plans 131

4.2.2 Using a custom Power Plan 131

4.2.3 Power efficiency diagnostics 133

4.2.4 Troubleshooting unexpected system wake-ups 133

4.3 WinRM 135

4.3.1 Configuring WinRM 135

4.3.2 Using WinRM for remote console 136

4.3.3 Using WinRM for systems management 136

4.4 PowerShell 138

4.4.1 Introducing PowerShell 139

4.4.2 PowerShell remoting 141

4.4.3 The PowerShell ISE 144

4.4.4 Using PowerShell for Windows management 146

4.5 Event Viewer 153

4.5.1 The Windows 7 Event Viewer UI 153

4.5.2 Custom views 155

4.5.3 Using events to trigger actions 156

4.5.4 Event forwarding 156

4.6 Task Scheduler 160

4.6.1 What'snewin the Task Scheduler 160

4.6.2 Pulling the trigger 160

4.6.3 Redefining the action 162

4.6.4 Scripting the Task Scheduler 164

4.7 Group Policy 166

4.7.1 What's new in Group Policy 166

4.7.2 New Group Policy categories 168

4.7.3 Group Policy templates 169

4.7.4 Group Policy Preferences 170

4.7.5 Troubleshooting Group Policy 174

4.8 Printers and the Print Management Console 180

4.8.1 Location-aware printing 180

4.8.2 Print Management Console 181

4.8.3 Group Policy to configure printer connections 186

4.9 System and data recovery 188

4.9.1 NTBackup support 188

4.9.2 File Backup and Restore 188

4.9.3 Image Backup and Restore 192

4.9.4 Shadow Copy 194

4.9.5 System Protection 196

4.9.6 Reinstalling Windows 7 198

4.10 Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) 199

4.10.1 Locating the Windows RE image 200

4.10.2 Booting Windows RE 201

4.10.3 Customizing Windows RE 202

4.11 Resource monitoring 204

4.11.1 Resource Monitor 205

4.11.2 Reliability Monitor 207

4.12 Windows Troubleshooting Framework 209

4.13 Remote Desktop and Remote Assistance 214

4.13.1 What's new in Remote Desktop 214

4.13.2 The Windows 7 Remote Desktop Client 216

4.13.3 Remote Assistance 219

5 Securing Windows 7 225

5.1 User Account Control 225

5.1.1 The security triangle 225

5.1.2 What is UAC about? 226

5.1.3 What happened to UAC in Windows 7? 227

5.1.4 What does UAC strip from the access token? 228

5.1.5 When does the Consent UI kick in 231

5.1.6 Configuring UAC in the Control Panel 232

5.1.7 UAC Group Policy options 233

5.2 File and registry virtualization 235

5.2.1 What is file and registry virtualization? 235

5.2.2 When are files and registry entries vortualized? 236

5.2.3 How file visualization works 236

5.2.4 How registry virtualization works 238

5.2.5 Investigating virtualization 239

5.2.6 Possible issues with file and registry virtuaiization 240

5.2.7 Controlling file and registry virtualization using Group Policy 241

5.3 Internet Explorer in Protected mode 242

5.3.1 Integrity levels and Internet Explorer Protected mode 242

5.3.2 User Account Control and Internet Explorer Protected mode 243

5.3.3 IE User Interface Privilege Isolation 244

5.3.4 Internet Explorer Compatibility Layer 244

5.4 Session 0 isolation 246

5.5 File system security 247

5.5.1 Owner ACL 247

5.5.2 Trustedlnstaller 249

5.5.3 What happened to Documents and Settings? 251

5.6 AppLocker 253

5.6.1 Creating AppLocker rules 254

5.6.2 Using AppLocker auditing 256

5.7 BitLocker 258

5.7.1 BitLocker to Go 258

5.7.2 BitLocker prerequisites 261

5.7.3 Limitations of BitLocker 262

5.7.4 How BitLocker works 262

5.7.5 BitLocker key scenarios 264

5.7.6 Key recovery and management 265

5.7.7 Configuring the TPM platform validation profile 267

5.7.8 Storing BitLocker recovery information in Active Directory 268

5.7.9 Installing BitLocker 271

5.7.10 Managing BitLocker 272

5.8 Removable Device Control 274

5.8.1 Device identification 274

5.8.2 The device identification process 276

5.8.3 Restricting device installation 276

5.8.4 Device driver installation by nonadministralors 278

5.8.5 Controlling Removable Storage Access 279

6 Windows 7 networking 281

6.1 The Next Generation Stack 282

6.2 Performance enhancements 283

6.3 Network Discovery 285

6.3.1 Link Layer Topology Discovery 285

6.3.2 Web Services for devices and function discovery 286

6.4 Network location awareness 286

6.4.1 Manually selected network locations 287

6.5 IPv6 288

6.5.1 IPv6 transition technologies 288

6.5.2 IPv6 addressing 289

6.5.3 Disabling IPv6 components 292

6.6 Name resolution 295

6.6.1 Enhancements in DNS 295

6.6.2 Link-Local Multicast Name Resolution (LLMNR) 297

6.6.3 Peer Name Resolution Protocol (PNRP) 299

6.7 Wireless networks 301

6.7.1 Managing wireless networks with Group Policy 301

6.7.2 Managing wireless networks from the command line 302

6.8 IPsec 304

6.8.1 New functionality for IPsec 304

6.8.2 IPsec authentication 306

6.8.3 Cryptographic algorithms for IPsec 307

6.9 VPN and dial-up networks 309

6.9.1 Tunneling protocols 309

6.9.2 VPN protocol comparison 311

6.10 Policy-based QoS 313

6.11 Windows Firewall with advanced security 315

6.11.1 Network location types 315

6.11.2 Configuring Windows Firewall with Advanced Security 318

6.11.3 Managing Windows Firewall from the command line 325

6.12 Network Access Protection (NAP) 326

6.12.1 NAP infrastructure components 326

6.12.2 NAP client configuration 328

6.13 DirectAccess 330

6.13.1 DirectAccess architecture 330

6.13.2 DirectAccess security 331

6.13.3 IPv6 connectivity and DirectAccess 331

6.13.4 Handling Internet and intranet traffic 333

6.14 Exempt network technology 334

7 Windows 7 Mobility 335

7.1 Offline Files 335

7.1.1 Offline Files and server configuration 337

7.1.2 Managing the offline file cache 338

7.2 Tablet PC Features 340

7.2.1 Tablet PC input panel 340

7.2.2 Pen Flicks 341

7.2.3 Calibration tool 341

7.3 Mobile Device Center 342

8 Migrating to Windows 7 343

8.1 (Roaming) Profiles 343

8.1.1 What's new in Windows 7 user profiles 343

8.1.2 Profile types in Windows 7 350

8.1.3 User profile compatibility 351

8.2 Application compatibility 352

8.2.1 Marking application compatibility in the UI 353

8.2.2 The Application Compatibility Database 355

8.3 User state migration 357

8.3.1 Windows Easy Transfer 357

8.3.2 User State Migration Tool (USMT) 4.0 358

Index 361

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