Windows CE 3.0: Application Programming

Overview

  • Windows CE 3.0 programming for Pocket PC, handheld PC, and embedded devices
  • Enterprise computing including COM, DCOM, database access using ADOCE, and Microsoft Message Queue
  • Communications, including Internet Web access with HTTP, TCP/IP, sockets, serial communications, and desktop synchronization with ...
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Overview

  • Windows CE 3.0 programming for Pocket PC, handheld PC, and embedded devices
  • Enterprise computing including COM, DCOM, database access using ADOCE, and Microsoft Message Queue
  • Communications, including Internet Web access with HTTP, TCP/IP, sockets, serial communications, and desktop synchronization with ActiveSync 3.0
  • Build and run applications in Visual C++ using Microsoft Foundation Classes
  • CD-ROM with eMbedded Visual C++ 3.0 and Pocket PC SDK
  • Beyond the user interface to hard-core programming
  • Full-scale networking and enterprise computing
  • Global communications from Pocket PCs
  • All the new features of Windows CE 3.0

Advanced techniques for serious Windows CE programmers.

Get beyond user interface programming and discover the behind-the-scenes operating system facilities that will let you make the most of the new features in Windows CE 3.0. This hot technology lets you control Pocket PCs, handheld PCs, and the embedded devices in hundreds of commercial products. Learn the lean and mean techniques that keep your programs humming on portable devices with limited memory, and the key data storage methods that make them possible. Master the communications protocols that keep Windows CE devices in contact with desktop computers and the Internet. In addition:

  • Build and run applications in Visual C++ 6.0 and eMbedded Visual C++ 3.0
  • Use the Windows CE API and Microsoft Foundation Classes
  • Communicate via HTTP, TCP/IP, sockets, remote access, and telephony
  • Access standard Windows CE databases and Microsoft SQL Server for W
  • Interface between desktop systems and Windows CE devices

This book is for serious developers with real programming experience. Besides familiarity with Windows CE devices and general Windows API programming, a basic knowledge of C and C++ is needed to understand the code samples.

About the Software

The accompanying CD-ROM contains all the code examples from the book, as well as a fully searchable index of all the book's examples, programs, and tutorials. The CD-ROM also contains a complete working copy of eMbedded Visual C++ 3.0 and Pocket PC SDK.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A book/CD-ROM package offering techniques for keeping programs working on portable devices with limited memory. For developers with programming experience, familiarity with Windows CE devices, and basic knowledge of C and C++. The accompanying CD-ROM contains code examples from the book, plus a searchable index of the book's examples, programs, and tutorials, and a complete working copy of eMbedded Visual C++ and Pocket PC SDK. Grattan is a mobile solutions specialist. Brain is founder of an educational content company. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130255921
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 10/20/2000
  • Series: Prentice Hall Microsoft Technology Series
  • Edition description: BK&CD ROM
  • Pages: 536
  • Product dimensions: 7.06 (w) x 9.27 (h) x 1.35 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

This book, in concept and design, grew out of the book Win32 System Services, written by Marshall Brain (1995, Prentice Hall PTR). There are many similarities between Win32 programming on Windows NT/98/2000 and Windows CE programming, such as file I/O, processes, and threads. There are many differences, too—Windows CE uses a smaller API (Application Programming Interface) and has fewer security functions and no services. Also, each type of programming emphasizes different issues. Windows CE devices, such as Pocket PC, need to communicate using a wide variety of techniques. These devices also must store data locally so that users can manipulate data when not connected to enterprise networks. This data (or more specifically, changes to this data) then has to be communicated back to the databases located on enterprise servers. The importance of this process is reflected in this book's content, and draws on my experiences in writing enterprise solutions using Windows CE.

Like Brain's original book, this book, for three main reasons, does not cover user interface programming. First, Windows CE user interface programming is very similar to Win32, albeit with some differences in the shell and the form factor (the size of the screen). Second, many embedded devices using Windows CE do not have a display, making user interface development irrelevant to a significant number of programmers. Third, in more and more cases Pocket Internet Explorer is used to present the user interface, with some amount of Windows CE code to allow disconnected access to data.

I hope this book helps you to overcome the challenges in writing applications formobile, wireless, and embedded devices using Windows CE, and to gain from the tremendous opportunities in this area.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1 Introduction 1
2 Files 19
3 Object Store, Directory, and Network Operations 45
4 Property Databases and the Registry 70
5 Processes and Threads 120
6 Thread Synchronization 146
7 Notifications 170
8 Communications Using TCP/IP: HTTP and Sockets 185
9 Serial Communications 236
10 The Remote API (RAPI) 257
11 Telephone API (TAPI) and Remote Access Services (RAS) 284
12 Memory Management 313
13 System Information and Power Management 326
14 COM and ActiveX 335
15 Microsoft Message Queue (MSMQ) 374
16 ADOCE and SQL Server for Windows CE 412
17 ActiveSync 445
Index 479
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Preface

This book, in concept and design, grew out of the book Win32 System Services, written by Marshall Brain (1995, Prentice Hall PTR). There are many similarities between Win32 programming on Windows NT/98/2000 and Windows CE programming, such as file I/O, processes, and threads. There are many differences, too—Windows CE uses a smaller API (Application Programming Interface) and has fewer security functions and no services. Also, each type of programming emphasizes different issues. Windows CE devices, such as Pocket PC, need to communicate using a wide variety of techniques. These devices also must store data locally so that users can manipulate data when not connected to enterprise networks. This data (or more specifically, changes to this data) then has to be communicated back to the databases located on enterprise servers. The importance of this process is reflected in this book's content, and draws on my experiences in writing enterprise solutions using Windows CE.

Like Brain's original book, this book, for three main reasons, does not cover user interface programming. First, Windows CE user interface programming is very similar to Win32, albeit with some differences in the shell and the form factor (the size of the screen). Second, many embedded devices using Windows CE do not have a display, making user interface development irrelevant to a significant number of programmers. Third, in more and more cases Pocket Internet Explorer is used to present the user interface, with some amount of Windows CE code to allow disconnected access to data.

I hope this book helps you to overcome the challenges in writing applications for mobile, wireless, and embeddeddevices using Windows CE, and to gain from the tremendous opportunities in this area.

Read More Show Less

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2003

    Not a GUI book

    Looks like a great book and pretty intense, I have only gotten partway through it. The explanations are complete and low-level. But be warned, if you have never written any code for Windows or Windows CE before (like me, I have written tons of *nix code), this book won't give you much help on writing Event Handlers and such.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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