Windows CE for Dummies

Overview

Imagine being able to hold your desktop Windows PC in the palm of your hand. Thanks to the Windows CE operating system and hand-held computers from manufacturers such as Hewlett-Packard, Compaq, and Casio, not only can you hold it in your hand but also you can take it on the road, to meetings with clients and vendors, and anywhere else you need access to a your PC. Windows CE For Dummies explains everything you need to know to make all this pocket-sized computing power work for you. Author and mobile computing ...
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Overview

Imagine being able to hold your desktop Windows PC in the palm of your hand. Thanks to the Windows CE operating system and hand-held computers from manufacturers such as Hewlett-Packard, Compaq, and Casio, not only can you hold it in your hand but also you can take it on the road, to meetings with clients and vendors, and anywhere else you need access to a your PC. Windows CE For Dummies explains everything you need to know to make all this pocket-sized computing power work for you. Author and mobile computing expert Jinjer Simon shows you how to keep your palmtop in synch with your desktop, track appointments and set reminders, work with Excel and Word documents, exchange e-mail messages, and even surf the 'Net.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764502606
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/28/1997
  • Series: For Dummies Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 384
  • Product dimensions: 7.34 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction

About This Book
Conventions Used in This Book
What You're Not to Read
Foolish Assumptions
How This Book Is Organized
Part I: Windows CE Basics
Part II: What Can I Do with My Handheld PC?
Part III: Interfacing with Your Desktop Computer
Part IV: Getting Online with Windows CE
Part V: Personalizing Your Handheld PC
Part VI: The Part of Tens
Icons Used in This Book
Where to Go from Here

Part I: Windows CE Basics

Chapter 1: What Is Windows CE?

Understanding Windows CE
Locating Installed Windows CE Programs
Examining a Handheld PC
The touch screen and stylus
The keyboard
Turning on your night-light
Battery power -- How long does it last?
What is this cable for?
Understanding storage capabilities
What goes in that slot?
Infrared port
What is that flashing light?
Should I press the Reset button?
Selecting a Handheld PC
Turning on Your Handheld PC for the First Time
Setting up your handheld PC
Rerunning the Setup Wizard

Chapter 2: Working with Your Windows CE Desktop

What Are All Those Pictures on the Desktop?
Organizing Your Desktop
Arranging your icons
Adding a new program to the desktop
Recycling Unwanted Items
Giving the Taskbar Something to Do
Doing Windows
The toolbar
The scroll bars
Doing Dialog Boxes
Unveiling the Start Menu
Exploring your handheld PC
Searching for programs to run
Finding the most recent documents
Finding some extra help
Running a program
Shutting down for the day

Part II: What Can I Do with My Handheld PC?

Chapter 3: Organizing Your Time

Locating Your Calendar
Changing Your Frame of View
Creating an Appointment
Setting a reminder for your appointment
Making an appointment recurring
Creating a full-day event
Adding additional information to an appointment
Removing Unwanted Appointments and Events
Deleting an appointment
Deleting a full-day event
Viewing Today's Agenda
Synchronizing Your Calendar with Schedule+ 7.0 or Microsoft Outlook
Chapter 4: Keeping Track of Everyday Tasks
Is It Really a Task?
Locating the Tasks Program
Creating a New Task
Setting task reminders
Creating recurring tasks
Adding notes to a task
Removing Tasks
Examining Your List of Tasks
Sorting the tasks
Viewing only specific tasks
Indicating That a Task Is Completed
Modifying Tasks
Checking Today's Tasks in the Calendar Program
Synchronizing Tasks with Your Desktop Computer
Chapter 5: Maintaining an Electronic Address Book
Finding the Contacts Program
Creating a New Contact
Business tab
Personal tab
Notes tab
Locating Contacts
Looking at the list alphabetically
Sorting the contacts
Quickly locating information in the list
Finding information on a contact card
Changing the Display Options
Removing a Contact
Sharing Contacts with Other Handheld PCs
Transferring Information Between Your Handheld PC and a Desktop Computer
Chapter 6: Working with Documents in Pocket Word
Locating Pocket Word
Creating a New Document
Saving Your Document
Saving a document for the first time
Saving a document that you previously saved
Saving a document with a new name
Closing a Document
Opening an Existing Document
Opening the document you worked on last
Using a sample document
Locating Text
Finding specific text
Replacing text
Selecting Text with Windows CE
Moving Text
Copying Text
Formatting Text
Selecting a different font
Changing the font size
Modifying the font style
Creating a Bulleted List
Outlining Your Document
Viewing the outline of a document
Working in Outline view
Opening a Microsoft Word Document
Printing Documents
Chapter 7: Crunching Numbers in Pocket Excel
Locating Pocket Excel
Creating a New Workbook
Opening an Existing Workbook
Opening the workbook that you worked on last
Using a sample workbook
Adding Data to a Worksheet
Working with constants
Adding text
Entering numbers
Adding dates and times
Dealing with currency
Inserting percentages
Using formulas
Resizing Rows and Columns
Dragging rows and columns
Using the formatting options
Adding and Removing Cells
Adding cells
Removing cells
Moving Data on the Worksheet
Formatting Cells
Indicating the category of data
Specifying cell alignment
Indicating font values
Selecting borders
Quickly Summing Data
Automatically Filling Cells with Data
Copying data
Inserting a series of data
Locating Desired Data
Finding text
Replacing text
Working with Different Worksheets
Viewing a different worksheet
Changing the name of a worksheet
Adding a new worksheet
Getting rid of a worksheet
Reordering the worksheets
Closing a Workbook
Saving a Workbook
Saving a workbook for the first time
Saving a workbook that you previously saved
Saving a workbook with a new name
Opening a Microsoft Excel Workbook
Printing Worksheets
Chapter 8: Managing Your Files
Locating Files
Changing the way you view folder contents
Looking inside a folder
Working with Folders
Creating a new folder
Renaming a folder or file
Moving stuff around -- cut, copy, and paste
Deleting a folder or file
Rescuing a deleted file
Determining file types
Understanding file icons
Viewing file properties
Working with Files on a PC Card
Sharing Files with Another Handheld PC

Part III: Interfacing with Your Desktop Computer

Chapter 9: Installing H/PC Explorer
Figuring Out when to Connect
Understanding the Requirements for Connecting
Connecting the Interface Cable
Running the H/PC Explorer Install Program
Installing the Microsoft Exchange messaging update
Installing Microsoft Schedule+ 7.0a
Installing Microsoft H/PC Explorer
Chapter 10: A Tour of H/PC Explorer
Running H/PC Explorer
Exploring Your Handheld PC from Your Desktop Computer
Moving Stuff Between Your Computer and Handheld PC
Dragging and dropping files and folders
Cutting, copying, and pasting files between locations
Dealing with Folders
Adding a new folder
Renaming a folder or file
Printing Files
Setting File Conversion Properties
Setting general conversion options
Indicating settings for copying to the desktop computer
Indicating settings for copying to your handheld PC
Chapter 11: Synchronizing Information
Understanding Synchronization
Performing a Synchronization
Setting the Synchronization Options
Selecting automatic synchronization
Resolving scheduling conflicts
Chapter 12: Backing Up and Restoring Windows CE Information
Performing a Backup
Setting the Backup Options
Restoring a Backup
Chapter 13: Adding New Software to Your Handheld PC
Locating Windows CE Programs
Installing a New Program
Copying the program file to your handheld PC
Running an installation program
Removing a Program from Your Handheld PC

Part IV: Getting Online with Windows CE

Chapter 14: Connecting to a Remote Location
Creating a Remote Connection
Configuring a connection
Port settings
Call options
Modifying the TCP/IP settings
Changing the settings for a remote connection
Connecting to a Remote Location
Turning off call waiting
Connecting from a different location
Chapter 15: Connecting to the Internet
Installing Pocket Internet Explorer
Copying the Pocket Internet Explorer files to your desktop computer
Loading Pocket Internet Explorer on your Handheld PC
Upgrading to other versions of Pocket Internet Explorer
Setting Up Your Internet Connection
Manually connecting to the Internet
Setting the automatic dialing option
Browsing the Internet
Using the Pocket Internet Explorer toolbar
Jumping to a new location
Searching for a specific site on the Internet
Deja View: Returning to a page you've previously viewed
Saving Your Favorite Sites
Jumping to a favorite Web site
Creating shortcuts on the desktop
Customizing Your Browser
Specifying a different start page
Specifying a different search page
Changing the appearance of Web pages
Chapter 16: Sending and Receiving E-Mail
Connecting to a Mail Server
Locating the Inbox program
Specifying your e-mail address
Making the connection
Handling E-Mail
Creating an e-mail message
Reading a message
Organizing Your E-Mail
Finding new places to store messages
Copying and moving messages
Deleting unwanted mail
Transferring messages between your handheld PC and desktop computer

Part V: Personalizing Your Handheld PC

Chapter 17: Protecting Vital Information
Labeling Your Handheld PC With Your Personal Information
Password-Protecting the Contents of Your Handheld PC
Chapter 18: Personalizing Your Desktop
Locating the Control Panel Options
Changing the Look of Your Desktop
Making Things Sound Differently
Adjusting the volume
Selecting new sounds
Changing the World Clock Options
Setting date and time information
Modifying the time zone
Setting alarms
Adjusting the Keyboard Settings

Part VI: The Part of Tens

Chapter 19: Top Ten Windows CE Handheld PCs
Casio Cassiopeia
Compaq PC Companion
Philips Velo 1
NEC MobilePro
Hewlett Packard Palmtop PC
LG Electronics Handheld PC
Hitachi Handheld PC
Navitel TouchPhone
Chapter 20: Ten Ways to Spend Money on Your Handheld PC
Modem
Memory Card
Docking Station
Storage Case
Rechargeable Battery
AC Adapter
Stylus
Additional RAM
Paging Equipment
GPS
Chapter 21: Ten Common Problems You May Encounter with Your Handheld PC
The Batteries Run Down Too Quickly
The Handheld PC Won't Turn On
I Can't Remember My Password
I Can't Install Windows 95 Programs
The Device Can't Locate My Desktop Computer
H/PC Explorer Can't Convert Microsoft Word Files
My Microsoft Word File Won't Open in Windows CE
I Want to Send E-Mail to Several People at Once
Need Storage Space for a New Program
The Device Turns Off by Itself

Glossary

Index

IDG Books Worldwide Registration Card

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First Chapter

Chapter 5
Maintaining an Electronic Address Book

In This Chapter

  • Locating the Contacts program
  • Creating a new contact
  • Locating a contact in the list
  • Sharing contact lists with other handheld PCs
  • Adjusting the display options for the contact list
  • Backing up and restoring a contact list

Unless you are a hermit, you probably have a list of people with which you correspond on a regular basis. To help you keep track of these people, Windows CE provides a program called Contacts that resembles an electronic address book. You can store all kinds of information about the people and businesses that you contact regularly, and you can find the person you are looking for without manually flipping through a "real" address book or card file.

This chapter discusses the various ways you can use the Contacts program to create, view, and modify your contacts' information. It also discusses how you can obtain data from other sources, such as your desktop computer or another handheld PC.

Finding the Contacts Program

Before you can keep track of information about different people and companies, you first must decide where you want to store this information. If you write it down in an address book, you'll probably have to get out the correction fluid to correct an entry when someone moves. If you store the information on your handheld PC, however, you can simply retype the new information in the appropriate location.

Usually, the Contacts program is fairly easy to locate. Even though the program is called Contacts, not Address Book, its icon resembles a desktop address organizer. The icon should be sitting on the right side of your desktop (unless you have reorganized your desktop). After you locate the icon, double-tap on it to display the Contacts program.

If you cannot find the Contacts program icon sitting on your desktop, don't despair. You should be able to locate it by following these simple steps:

  1. Use your stylus to tap the Start button (in the bottom-left corner of the screen) to open the Start menu.
  2. Tap on the Programs option on the Start menu.

    Windows CE Explorer opens the Programs folder. You should be able to locate the Contacts icon, as shown in Figure 5-1.

  3. Double-tap on the Contacts icon to display the Contacts program, as shown in Figure 5-2.

    This program is where you set up all of the important information about the different people and businesses that you need to contact in the future.

If you use Schedule+ 7.0 or Microsoft Outlook on your PC to keep track of your contacts, you can transfer those contacts to your handheld PC. I discuss this topic in more detail later in this chapter in the "Transferring Information Between Your Handheld PC and a Desktop Computer" section. See the "Sharing Contacts with Other Handheld PCs" section, later in this chapter, to find out how to share contacts with other Windows CE users.

Creating a New Contact

You can add any type of contact to your contact list. You may want to add the phone number of your favorite pizza delivery location, keep track of extensions for your coworkers, or maintain a Christmas card list. The Contact list can store anything and everything you want to know about each person. If you cannot find an appropriate field in which to add the information you want, you can enter the information on the Notes tab for the specific contact card.

To create a new contact, follow these steps:

  1. Tap on the New Contact icon on the toolbar at the top of the screen.

    The icon resembles an address card with a star above it. You can also add a new contact by selecting File-->New.

    The Contact card that appears contains three tabs. The sections that follow describe each of these tabs in detail.

  2. Enter information about the new contact on any or all of the tabs and then tap on the OK button to save the card.

    In order to save a Contact card, either the Name field or the Company Name field must contain a value. If you try to save the card without filling in one of these fields, you receive an error message.

If you are fortunate enough to have already set up all this information in Schedule+ 7.0 or Microsoft Outlook on your desktop computer, you can copy the information to your handheld PC. For more information, refer to the "Transferring Information Between Your Handheld PC and a Desktop Computer" section, later in this chapter.

Free-form information?

Each contact card has an open block of space in which you can enter the contact's name and address. Windows CE automatically separates the name into first, middle, and last name segments. It also separates the address into components by street address, city, state, zip code, and country.

If you want to ensure that you enter names and addresses in the correct format, you can open the Confirm screen and specify each individual piece of the address or name. To display the Confirm screen, tap on either the Name or Address field to highlight it, and then tap on the Confirm button that appears next to the field. This button resembles one large field being divided into smaller fields.

When you tap on the Confirm button, either the Confirm Address screen, or Confirm Name screen appears so that you can enter the appropriate information. Simply type the appropriate information in each field and then tap on the OK button.

Business tab

You use the Business tab, shown in Figure 5-3, to add business information about a contact. For example, you can enter your favorite computer sales person or movie theater, or information about your coworkers, such as their phone extensions.

Type the information you want in each field on the Business tab. To move the cursor between fields, you can either tap in the field or use the Tab key.

The Business tab has two fields labeled Other. In these fields, you can enter some kinds of information, such as the name of the person's assistant or the assistant's phone number, that does not belong in any of the other fields. To add information into an Other field, tap on either the field name or the Down Arrow button next to the field to display a list of the kind of information that you can enter (see Figure 5-4). Highlight the kind of information that you want to enter and then enter the information in the field next to the name.

Windows CE remembers the values that you enter in each option of the Other list. Therefore, you can store a value for each option, even though you can display only one option at a time in each of the Other fields.

Personal tab

You enter personal information about a contact in the Personal tab, shown in Figure 5-5. Simply type the information in each field. To move the cursor between fields, you can either tap in the field or use the Tab key.

The Personal tab also has two fields labeled Other. You can use these fields to enter personal information about the contact, such as the person's car telephone number or children's names, that does not belong in another field. To add information in this field, tap on either the field name or the Down Arrow button next to the field to display a list of the kinds of information that you can add (see Figure 5-6). Tap on the kind of information you want to enter and then enter the information in the field next to the name.

Windows CE remembers what you enter for each option in the Other list. Therefore, you can store a value for each option, even though you can see only one option at a time in each of the Other fields.

Notes tab

You can enter any information that doesn't belong in either the Business or Personal tabs in the Notes tab (see Figure 5-7).

You can enter an unlimited amount of information on the Notes tab using whatever type of formatting you desire. Unfortunately, no special fonts are available, so you can't be too fancy.

Locating Contacts

As you add more and more names to the contact list, the list gets longer and more difficult to read. Fortunately, you can view the information in several ways. You can sort the list by any of the columns of information, jump to the contacts that begin with a specific letter of the alphabet (if you know what you are searching for), or use the Find command to locate a contact.

Looking at the list alphabetically

You may have noticed the various tabs along the left side of the list that have the letters of the alphabet on them. You can use these tabs to jump to the contacts that start with specific letters of the alphabet. If you want to view the contacts that start with the letter T, for example, tap on the tab labeled rst. Windows CE highlights the first contact that begins with either the letters R, S, or T (see Figure 5-8).

If you tap on a tab that doesn't have any matches, Windows CE highlights the next closest match. For example, if you tap on cde and no contact starts with C, D, or E, Windows CE jumps to the next name after the letter E.

Sorting the contacts

Windows CE automatically sorts the list of contacts alphabetically based on the values in the first column, which is normally the Name column. You can, however, sort the list by another column, such as the Company Name column, if you want.

To sort the list of contacts by another column, tap on the column name. When you tap on a column, a triangle marker moves into the title of the column to indicate which column you are using to sort the list of names, as shown in Figure 5-9.

You can resize the columns so that more information appears on-screen by tapping on the bar between the column names and dragging it left or right.

Quickly locating information in the list

You can use the Quick Find field to find a specific word or name in the sorted column. The Quick Find field is located on the toolbar at the top of the screen, next to the button with the magnifying glass on it.

To locate a contact, type the name or word you are looking for in the Quick Find field, as shown in Figure 5-10. As you type each character, Windows CE scrolls down the list to find the closest match.

You can use the Quick Find field only to search the column that is currently being used as the sort column. If you are sorting the list by the Name column, for example, you can use Quick Find to find a specific name.

Finding information on a contact card

You can locate a contact card by using the Find button. The Find button resembles a magnifying glass and is located on the toolbar at the top of the screen.

When you tap on the Find button, the Find window appears (see Figure 5-11). In the Find window, type the text you are looking for and then tap on the Find Next button. Windows CE searches all of the contact cards until it locates the text you specified.

You can also open the Find window by selecting Tools-->Find. And if you have previously searched for a word, you can tap on the Down Arrow button and select the word rather than enter it again.

More than likely, the first card that appears will not be the card you are looking for. You can search again for the specified text by tapping on the Find Next button. You can continue to tap on the Find Next button until Windows CE locates the card you want to find or is unable to locate another match.

To make finding a contact card easier, search for text that is specific to the contact card you are looking for.

Changing the Display Options

You may find that the columns that appear in the Contacts window are not exactly the ones you want. If your list contains mostly personal addresses, for example, you probably don't care for the Company name and Work Tel columns.

To specify which columns appear in the Contacts window, choose Tools-->Options. The Options dialog box appears (see Figure 5-12). The Options dialog box allows you to not only specify which columns appear in the Contacts window but also the default country and area code to be used when adding contacts.

To change the information that appears in a particular column, tap on the Down Arrow button next to the column and select the information. You can select any of the fields that appear on the contact card.

The contacts' names always appear in the first column. You can specify only whether you want the first names or last names to appear first. Windows CE sorts the column alphabetically based on which names come first. In other words, if the first names appear first, Windows CE sorts the names in the column alphabetically by first names.

The default country that is displayed when you create a contact card is the United States. If most of the contacts are outside the United States, tap on the Down Arrow button next to the Country field and select the appropriate country.

The default area code that displays each time you type a phone number is the same as the area code you set up for your personal information. If you want to change the area code, type the area code in the Area Code field. Doing so changes the default area code for the Contacts program and leaves the system information alone.

Removing a Contact

You don't have to purchase a new address book to revise your contacts. Windows CE makes removing unwanted contacts from your Contact list quite simple.

To delete a contact, follow these simple steps:

1. Locate the contact in the contact list.

2. Tap on the contact to highlight it.

3. Tap on the Delete button at the top of the screen in the toolbar.

The Delete button resembles a giant X. When you select it, a message box appears to ask you to verify your selection (see Figure 5-13).

You can also delete a contact by choosing Edit-->Delete Item. Or you can press Ctrl+D to delete the selected contact, in case you prefer to use the keyboard.

Sharing Contacts with Other Handheld PCs

You can use the Contacts program to share contacts with another handheld PC, as long as both handheld PCs have an infrared port.

The infrared port looks sort of like a black mirror on your handheld PC. If you are unsure whether your handheld PC has an infrared port, refer to the hardware documentation that came with the handheld PC.

To share contacts with another handheld PC, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure that both handheld PCs are turned on and the Contacts program is running on each handheld PC.
  2. Place the handheld PCs so that the infrared ports line up.

    The ports need to be within about three feet of each other, with nothing blocking the view. Because infrared ports use light beams to transfer data, they can't transfer information unless they have a good view of each other.

  3. On the first handheld PC (the one with the information), highlight the contacts you want to send to the other handheld PC.

    To select multiple contacts, hold down the Ctrl key on the keyboard and tap on the contacts you want to highlight.

  4. Select the File-->Send.

    A message box indicates that the handheld PC is looking for another handheld.

  5. On the other handheld PC, select File-->Receive.

    When the handheld PCs make contact with each other, the information is transferred from the first handheld PC to the second handheld PC.

Some types of fluorescent lighting can interfere with the data transfer. If you have problems transferring data, try moving the handheld PCs to another location.

Make sure that the infrared ports are not blocked by anything. If they cannot see each other, the handheld PCs can't transfer data.

Transferring Information Between Your Handheld PC and a Desktop Computer

If you currently use your desktop computer to maintain your contact list, you probably do not want to retype everything onto your new handheld PC. If you use Microsoft Schedule+ 7.0 or Microsoft Outlook under either Windows 95 or Windows NT 4.0, you don't have to.

Windows CE has been designed so that you can copy all of the contact information from your desktop computer onto your handheld PC. You can also turn around and copy the contact information on your handheld PC back into Schedule+. This process of making sure that both the handheld PC and desktop computer contain the same personal contact information is called synchronizing.

In order to synchronize your handheld PC with your desktop computer, you need to have a few things:

  • A data cable connected between your handheld PC and desktop computer
  • Handheld PC Explorer running on your desktop computer
  • Microsoft Schedule+ 7.0 or Microsoft Outlook on your desktop computer

For more detailed information about synchronizing your handheld PC and desktop computer, see Chapter 11.

You need to keep a few things in mind when you transfer contact information between your handheld PC and Microsoft Schedule+.

  • Unfortunately, Schedule+ does not offer all the information fields that are available in the Contacts program on your handheld PC. You cannot transfer the following fields of information into Schedule+: Middle, Mr/Mrs/Dr, Suffix, Car Tel, Children, Email2, Email3, Home Fax, and Web Page.
  • A few information fields in Schedule+ are not available in the Contacts program. You cannot copy the information in these fields to your handheld PC: User2, User3, and User4.
  • Two fields change names when you transfer from a handheld PC to a desktop computer. The Email1 field on your handheld PC becomes the User1 field in Schedule+, and the Work Fax field on your handheld PC becomes the Fax field in Schedule+.
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