Windows Communication Foundation 3.5 Unleashed

Overview

Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) is Microsoft’s dynamic technology for allowing autonomous software to communicate. Superseding earlier technologies such as COM/DCOM, .NET Remoting, ASP.NET Web Services, and the Web Services Enhancements for .NET, WCF provides a single solution that is designed to always be the best way to exchange data among software entities. It also provides the infrastructure for developing the next generation of Web Services, with support for the WS-* family of specifications, and a ...

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Overview

Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) is Microsoft’s dynamic technology for allowing autonomous software to communicate. Superseding earlier technologies such as COM/DCOM, .NET Remoting, ASP.NET Web Services, and the Web Services Enhancements for .NET, WCF provides a single solution that is designed to always be the best way to exchange data among software entities. It also provides the infrastructure for developing the next generation of Web Services, with support for the WS-* family of specifications, and a new serialization system for enhanced performance. In the 3.5 release, WCF has been expanded to include support for REST, JSON, and Syndication (RSS and Atom) services, further broadening the possibilities for what can be done. For information technology professionals, WCF supplies an impressive array of administration tools that enterprises and software vendors can use to reduce the cost of ownership of their solutions without writing a single line of code. Most important, WCF delivers on the promise of model-driven software development with the new software factory approach, by which one can iteratively design solutions in a modeling language and generate executables from lower-level class libraries.

Windows Communication Foundation 3.5 Unleashed is designed to be the essential resource for software developers and architects working with WCF. The book guides readers through a conceptual understanding of all the facilities of WCF and provides step-by-step guides to applying the technology to practical problems.

As evangelists at Microsoft for WCF, WF, and CardSpace, Craig McMurtry, Marc Mercuri, Nigel Watling, and Matt Winkler are uniquely positioned to write this book. They had access to the development team and to the product as it was being built. Their work with enterprises and outside software vendors has given them unique insight into how others see the software, how they want to apply it, and the challenges they face in doing so.

  • Gives you nearly 100 best practices for programming with WCF
  • Provides detailed coverage of how to version services that you will not find anywhere else
  • Delves into using WCF together with Windows Workflow Foundation (WF) and Windows CardSpace
  • Provides detailed coverage of the new high-performance data contract serializer for .NET
  • Walks you through creating secure, reliable, transacted messaging, and how to understand the available options
  • Introduces you to federated, claims-based security and shows you how to incorporate SAML and WS-Trust security token services into your architecture
  • Provides step-by-step instructions for how to customize every aspect of WCF
  • Shows you how to add behaviors, communication channels, message encoders, and transports
  • Presents options for implementing publish/subscribe solutions
  • Gives clear guidance on peer-to-peer communications with WCF
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780672330247
  • Publisher: Sams
  • Publication date: 10/21/2008
  • Series: Unleashed Series
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 740
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Matt Winkler is a senior Program Manager in Microsoft’s Connected Systems Division, where he focuses on building the visual designer for WF.  Previously he was the Technical Evangelist for WF, focusing on driving adoption among software developers around the world.  Based in Redmond, Matt spends his non-work time reading more tech books and chasing around his two children.

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Read an Excerpt

IntroductionIntroduction

The Windows Communication Foundation, which was code-named Indigo, is a technology that allows pieces of software to communicate with one another. There are many other such technologies, including the Component Object Model (COM) and Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM), Remote Method Invocation (RMI), Microsoft Message Queuing (MSMQ), and WebSphere MQ. Each of those works well in a particular scenario, not so well in others, and is of no use at all in some cases. The Windows Communication Foundation is meant to work well in any circumstance in which a Microsoft .NET assembly must exchange data with any other software entity. In fact, the Windows Communication Foundation is meant to always be the very best option. Its performance is at least on par with that of any other alternative and is usually better; it offers at least as many features and probably several more. It is certainly always the easiest solution to program.

Concretely, the Windows Communication Foundation consists of a small number of .NET libraries with several new sets of classes that it adds to the Microsoft .NET Framework class library, for use with version 2.0 and later of the .NET Common Language Runtime. It also adds some facilities for hosting Windows Communication Foundation solutions to the 5.1 and later versions of Internet Information Services (IIS), the web server built into Windows operating systems.

The Windows Communication Foundation is distributed free of charge as part of a set that includes several other technologies, including the Windows Presentation Foundation, which was code-named Avalon, Windows CardSpace, which was code-named InfoCard, and theWindows Workflow Foundation. Prior to its release, that group of technologies was called WinFX, but it was renamed the .NET Framework 3.0 in June 2006. Despite that name, the .NET Framework 3.0 and 3.5 is still primarily just a collection of classes added to the .NET Framework 2.0 for use with the 2.0 version of the .NET Common Language Runtime, along with some enhancements to the Windows operating system, as shown in Figure I.1.

Figure I.1
The .NET Framework 3.0.

You can install the .NET Framework 3.0 and 3.5 on Windows XP Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Server 2003 R2. The runtime components are preinstalled on Windows Vista. On Windows Server 2008 you can add the .NET Framework 3.0 via the Application Server Foundation role service. Only a very small number of features of the .NET Framework 3.0 are available exclusively on Windows Vista and later operating systems.

The .NET Framework 3.5 builds incrementally on top of .NET Framework 3.0. Features relevant to this book include web protocol support for building Windows Communication Foundation services, including AJAX, JSON, REST, POX, RSS and ATOM, workflow-enabled services and full tooling support in Visual Studio 2008. During development, .the NET Framework 3.5 was factored into "red" bits and "green" bits. The red bits were features from .NET Framework 3.0 and the goal was to provide Service Pack levels of compatibility. All the code that worked in 3.0 will work in 3.5. The green bits provide new, additional functionality. Again, the addition of an assembly containing new functionality should have no effect on existing code. The bottom line is that all the code in this book will work with .NET Framework 3.5 and all the code in this book (except the new features introduced in .NET Framework 3.5) should work in .NET Framework 3.0.

This book does not serve as an encyclopedic reference to the Windows Communication Foundation. Instead, it provides the understanding and knowledge required for most practical applications of the technology.

The book explains the Windows Communication Foundation while showing how to use it. So, typically, each chapter provides the precise steps for building a solution that demonstrates a particular aspect of the technology, along with a thorough explanation of each step. Readers who can program in C#, and who like to learn by doing, will be able to follow the steps. Those who prefer to just read will get a detailed account of the features of the Windows Communication Foundation and see how to use them.

To follow the steps in the chapters, you should have installed any version of Visual Studio 2005 or 2008 that includes the C# compiler. Free copies are available at http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/. You should also have IIS, ASP.NET, and MSMQ installed.

The .NET Framework 3.0 or 3.5 is required, as you might expect. You can download them from http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/. The instructions in the chapters assume that all the runtime and developer components of the .NET Framework 3.0 or 3.5 have been installed. It is the runtime components that are preinstalled on Windows Vista and that can be added via the Server Manager on Windows Server 2008. The developer components consist of a Software Development Kit (SDK) and two enhancements to Visual Studio 2005. The SDK provides documentation, some management tools, and a large number of very useful samples. The enhancements to Visual Studio 2005 augment the support provided by IntelliSense for editing configuration files, and provide a visual designer for Windows Workflow Foundation workflows. These features are included in Visual Studio 2008.

To fully utilize Windows CardSpace, which is also covered in this book, you should install Internet Explorer 7. Internet Explorer 7 is also available from http://www.microsoft.com/downloads.

Starting points for the solutions built in each of the chapters are available for download from the book's companion page on the publisher's website, as well as from http://http://www.cryptmaker.com/WindowsCommunicationFoundationUnleashed. To ensure that Visual Studio does not complain about the sample code being from a location that is not fully trusted, you can, after due consideration, right-click the downloaded archive, choose Properties from the context menu, and click on the button labeled Unblock, shown in Figure I.2, before extracting the files from the archive.

Figure I.2
Unblocking a downloaded source code archive.

Note that development on the Vista operating system is supported for Visual Studio 2008 and for Visual Studio 2005 with the Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 Update for Windows Vista. This update is also available from http://www.microsoft.com/downloads. Developers working with an earlier version of Visual Studio 2005 on the Vista operating system should anticipate some compatibility issues. To minimize those issues, they can do two things. The first is to disable Vista's User Account Protection feature. The second is to always start Visual Studio 2005 by right-clicking on the executable or the shortcut, selecting Run As from the context menu that appears, and selecting the account of an administrator from the Run As dialog.

As with the .NET Framework 3.5 when compared to the .NET Framework 3.0, this book is very similar to its predecessor. Changes include the addition of Visual Studio 2008 support and Chapter 3, "Data Representation and Durable Services," now covers durable services. The chapters on Windows CardSpace show the updated user interface and cover new features. Chapter 18, "Representational State Transfer and Plain

Many people contributed to this book. The authors would like to thank Joe Long, Eric Zinda, Angela Mills, Omri Gazitt, Steve Swartz, Steve Millet, Mike Vernal, Doug Purdy, Eugene Osvetsky, Daniel Roth, Ford McKinstry, Craig McLuckie, Alex Weinert, Shy Cohen, Yasser Shohoud, Kenny Wolf, Anand Rajagopalan, Jim Johnson, Andy Milligan, Steve Maine, Ram Pamulapati, Ravi Rao, Mark Garbara, Andy Harjanto, T. R. Vishwanath, Doug Walter, Martin Gudgin, Marc Goodner, Giovanni Della-Libera, Kirill Gavrylyuk, Krish Srinivasan, Mark Fussell, Richard Turner, Ami Vora, Ari Bixhorn, Steve Cellini, Neil Hutson, Steve DiMarco, Gianpaolo Carraro, Steve Woodward, James Conard, Nigel Watling, Vittorio Bertocci, Blair Shaw, Jeffrey Schlimmer, Matt Tavis, Mauro Ottoviani, John Frederick, Mark Renfrow, Sean Dixon, Matt Purcell, Cheri Clark, Mauricio Ordonez, Neil Rowe, Donovan Follette, Pat Altimore, Tim Walton, Manu Puri, Ed Pinto, Erik Weiss, Suwat Chitphakdibodin, Govind Ramanathan, Ralph Squillace, John Steer, Brad Severtson, Gary Devendorf, Kavita Kamani, George Kremenliev, Somy Srinivasan, Natasha Jethanandani, Ramesh Seshadri, Lorenz Prem, Laurence Melloul, Clemens Vasters, Joval Lowy, John Justice, David Aiken, Larry Buerk, Wenlong Dong, Nicholas Allen, Carlos Figueira, Ram Poornalingam, Mohammed Makarechian, David Cliffe, David Okonak, Atanu Banerjee, Steven Metsker, Antonio Cruz, Steven Livingstone, Vadim Meleshuk, Elliot Waingold, Yann Christensen, Scott Mason, Jan Alexander, Johan Lindfors, Hanu Kommalapati, Steve Johnson, Tomas Restrepo, Tomasz Janczuk, Garrett Serack, Jeff Baxter, Arun Nanda, Luke Melton, and Al Lee.

A particular debt of gratitude is owed to John Lambert for reviewing the drafts. No one is better qualified to screen the text of a book on a programming technology than an experienced professional software tester. Any mistakes in the pages that follow are solely the fault of the writers, however.

The authors are especially grateful for the support of their wives. They are Marta MacNeill, Kathryn Mercuri, Sylvie Watling, and Libby Winkler. Matt, the only parent so far, would also like to thank his daughter, Grace.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Part I Introducing the Windows Communication Foundation

Chapter 1 Prerequisites 9

Partial Types ....................................................................................................9

Generics.........................................................................................................10

Nullable Value Types.....................................................................................13

The Lightweight Transaction Manager.........................................................14

Role Providers ...............................................................................................16

Summary .......................................................................................................18

References......................................................................................................19

Chapter 2 The Fundamentals 21

Background ...................................................................................................21

Enter Services ................................................................................................24

Windows Communication Foundation .......................................................26

The Service Model.........................................................................................28

 A Software Resource.............................................................................34

 Building a Service for Accessing the Resource ....................................36

 Using the Service .................................................................................55

 Hosting the Service in IIS....................................................................67

 Changing How the Service Communicates ........................................72

Visual Studio 2008 Tool Support ..................................................................75

Summary .......................................................................................................82

References......................................................................................................83

Chapter 3 Data Representation and Durable Services 85

Background ...................................................................................................85

The

The

 Building a Service ................................................................................92

 Building a Client..................................................................................95

 Succumbing to the Urge to Look at

 The Case for the DataContractSerializer .............................................95

Using the DataContractSerializer .................................................................96

Exception Handling ....................................................................................110

Durable Services ..........................................................................................114

 Why Durable Services? ......................................................................114

 Implementing Durable Services ........................................................115

Summary .....................................................................................................122

References....................................................................................................123

Chapter 4 Sessions, Reliable Sessions, Queues, and Transactions 125

Reliable Sessions..........................................................................................125

Reliable Sessions in Action ................................................................127

Session Management ..................................................................................129

Queued Delivery .........................................................................................130

Enhancements in Windows Vista .....................................................132

Transactions ................................................................................................134

Summary .....................................................................................................143

Part II Introducing the Windows Workflow Foundation

chapter 5 Fundamentals of the Windows Workflow Foundation 147

What Is Windows Workflow Foundation?.................................................147

 What Windows Workflow Foundation Is Not ..................................148

Activities......................................................................................................149

 Out of the Box Activities ...................................................................151

 Creating Custom Activities ...............................................................152

 Communicating with Activities ........................................................160

 Design Behavior.................................................................................167

 Transactions and Compensation.......................................................170

Workflow Models ........................................................................................172

 Sequential Workflows ........................................................................175

 State Machine Workflows..................................................................183

 Custom Root Activities......................................................................184

Workflow Hosting.......................................................................................184

 Hosting the Runtime .........................................................................185

 Runtime Services................................................................................186

 Custom Services.................................................................................196

Rules Engine................................................................................................199

 Rules as Conditions ...........................................................................200

 The ConditionedActivityGroup Activity...........................................202

 Rules as Policy....................................................................................204

Summary .....................................................................................................207

References....................................................................................................207

Chapter 6 Using the Windows Communication Foundation

and the Windows Workflow Foundation Together 209

Consuming Services....................................................................................210

 Calling Services in a Custom Activity...............................................210

 Using the Send Activity (the 3.5 Approach) .....................................214

 Extending the Send Activity..............................................................217

Orchestrating Services.................................................................................219

Exposing Workflows as Services .................................................................220

 Hosting Inside a WCF Service (.NET 3.0)..........................................220

 Exposing a Workflow as a Service (.NET 3.5)....................................226

 Creating a Workflow Service .............................................................233

 Context ..............................................................................................234

 Patterns of Communication..............................................................237

Summary .....................................................................................................248

References....................................................................................................248

Part III Security

Chapter 7 Security Basics 251

Basic Tasks in Securing Communications ..................................................251

Transport Security and Message Security ...................................................252

Using Transport Security.............................................................................253

 Installing Certificates.........................................................................253

 Identifying the Certificate the Server Is to Provide ..........................255

 Configuring the Identity of the Server .............................................256

 Transport Security in Action .............................................................257

Using Message Security...............................................................................263

Impersonation and Authorization..............................................................269

Impersonation.............................................................................................269

Authorization ..............................................................................................272

Reversing the Changes to Windows...........................................................281

 Uninstalling the Certificates .............................................................281

 Removing the SSL Configuration from IIS .......................................282

 Removing the SSL Configuration from HTTP.SYS ............................283

 Restoring the Identity of the Server..................................................283

Summary .....................................................................................................283

References....................................................................................................284

Chapter 8 Windows CardSpace, Information Cards, and the Identity Metasystem 285

The Role of Identity ....................................................................................285

Microsoft Passport and Other Identity Solutions ......................................288

The Laws of Identity ...................................................................................290

The Identity Metasystem ............................................................................291

Information Cards and CardSpace .............................................................297

Managing Information Cards .....................................................................299

Architecture, Protocols, and Security .........................................................306

CardSpace and the Enterprise.....................................................................319

New Features in .NET Framework 3.5 ........................................................322

HTTP Support in .NET Framework 3.5 .......................................................324

Summary .....................................................................................................326

References....................................................................................................327

Chapter 9 Securing Applications with Information Cards 329

Developing for the Identity Metasystem....................................................329

Simple Demonstration of CardSpace..........................................................331

Prerequisites for the CardSpace Samples ....................................................332

 1) Enable Internet Information Services and ASP.NET 2.0 ...............333

  2) Get X.509 Certificates ...................................................................333

 3) Import the Certificates into the Certificate Store.........................334

 4) Update the Hosts File with DNS Entries to Match the Certificates .........334

 5) Internet Information Services Setup .............................................335

 6) Certificate Private Key Access .......................................................335

 7) HTTP Configuration......................................................................336

Adding Information Cards to a WCF Application.....................................337

Adding Information Cards .........................................................................342

Using a Federation Binding ........................................................................347

Catching Exceptions ...................................................................................348

Processing the Issued Token .......................................................................350

Using the Metadata Resolver ......................................................................351

Adding Information Cards to Browser Applications..................................353

Creating a Managed Card...........................................................................364

Building a Simple Security Token Service ..................................................367

Using CardSpace over HTTP .......................................................................370

Summary .....................................................................................................370

References....................................................................................................370

Chapter 10 Advanced Security 371

Prelude.........................................................................................................371

Securing Resources with Claims .................................................................372

 Claims-Based Authorization Versus Role-Based Authorization ........373

 Claims-Based Authorization Versus Access Control Lists .................374

Leveraging Claims-Based Security Using XSI .............................................377

 Authorizing Access to an Intranet Resource Using

 Windows Identity............................................................................377

 Improving the Initial Solution ..........................................................384

 Adding STSs as the Foundation for Federation.................................391

 Reconfiguring the Resource Access Service .......................................405

 Reconfiguring the Client ...................................................................408

 Experiencing the Power of Federated,

Claims-Based Identity with XSI ......................................................411

Claims-Based Security and Federated Security ...........................................412

Summary .....................................................................................................413

References....................................................................................................414

Part IV Integration and Interoperability

Chapter 11 Legacy Integration 417

COM+ Integration.......................................................................................417

 Supported Interfaces ..........................................................................418

 Selecting the Hosting Mode ..............................................................419

Using the COM+ Service Model Configuration Tool.................................419

Exposing a COM+ Component as a Windows

Communication Foundation Web Service...............................................421

 Referencing in the Client ..................................................................426

Calling a Windows Communication Foundation Service from COM ......428

 Building the Service...........................................................................428

 Building the Client ............................................................................431

 Building the VBScript File .................................................................433

 Testing the Solution...........................................................................433

Integrating with MSMQ..............................................................................433

Creating a Windows Communication Foundation Service

That Integrates with MSMQ.....................................................................434

 Creating the Request .........................................................................434

 Creating the Service...........................................................................435

 Creating the Client............................................................................438

Testing................................................................................................442

Summary .....................................................................................................443

Chapter 12 Interoperability 445

Summary .....................................................................................................448

References....................................................................................................448

Part V Extending the Windows Communication Foundation

Chapter 13 Custom Behaviors 451

Extending the Windows Communication Foundation .............................451

Extending the Service Model with Custom Behaviors ..............................452

 Declare What Sort of Behavior You Are Providing ...........................453

 Attach the Custom Behavior to an Operation or Endpoint.............457

 Inform the Windows Communication Foundation of the Custom Behavior ....457

Implementing a Custom Behavior .............................................................458

 Declare the Behavior .........................................................................458

 Attach.................................................................................................458

 Inform................................................................................................459

Implementing Each Type of Custom Behavior..........................................467

 Operation Selector .............................................................................467

 Parameter Inspector...........................................................................469

 Message Formatter .............................................................................471

 Message Inspector..............................................................................473

 Instance Context Provider.................................................................476

 Instance Provider ...............................................................................477

 Operation Invokers............................................................................478

Implementing a WSDL Export Extension ..................................................479

 Implementation Steps .......................................................................480

Custom Behaviors in Action.......................................................................482

Summary .....................................................................................................483

References....................................................................................................483

Chapter 14 Custom Channels 485

Binding Elements........................................................................................485

 Outbound Communication ..............................................................486

 Inbound Communication .................................................................487

Channels Have Shapes................................................................................488

Channels Might Be Required to Support Sessions .....................................490

Matching Contracts to Channels ...............................................................490

Communication State Machines ................................................................492

Building Custom Binding Elements ...........................................................493

 Understand the Starting Point ..........................................................493

 Provide a Custom Binding Element That Supports Outbound Communication ............495

 Amend the Custom Binding Element to Support Inbound Communication.....................502

 Applying a Custom Binding Element Through Configuration ........................................508

Summary .....................................................................................................511

Chapter 15 Custom Transports 513

Transport Channels.....................................................................................513

 Inbound Communication .................................................................514

 Outbound Communication ..............................................................514

Message Encoders........................................................................................514

Completing the Stack .................................................................................514

Implementing a Transport Binding Element and an

Encoder Binding Element.........................................................................516

 The Scenario ......................................................................................516

 The Requirements..............................................................................517

 The TcpListener and the TcpClient Classes.......................................517

Implementing Custom Binding Elements to Support an Arbitrary TCP Protocol ...........520

 The Configuration .............................................................................520

 The Custom Transport Binding Element ..........................................522

 The Channel Listener ........................................................................525

 The Transport Channel .....................................................................528

 The Message Encoder.........................................................................530

 Using the Custom Transport Binding Element.................................532

Summary .....................................................................................................532

References....................................................................................................533

Part VI Special Cases

Chapter 16 Publish/Subscribe Systems 537

Publish/Subscribe Using Callback Contracts..............................................538

Publish/Subscribe Using MSMQ Pragmatic Multicasting ..........................544

Publish/Subscribe Using Streaming ............................................................552

 The Streamed Transfer Mode.............................................................553

 Transmitting a Custom Stream with the Streamed Transfer Mode.......557

 Implementing Publish/Subscribe Using the Streamed Transfer Mode and a Custom Stream .......561

Summary .....................................................................................................565

References....................................................................................................566

Chapter 17 Peer Communication 567

Using Structured Data in Peer-to-Peer Applications ..................................567

Leveraging the Windows Peer-to-Peer Networking

Development Platform .............................................................................568

Understanding Windows Peer-to-Peer Networks .......................................569

Using Peer Channel ....................................................................................569

 Endpoints...........................................................................................569

 Binding ..............................................................................................570

 Address...............................................................................................574

 Contract .............................................................................................574

 Implementation.................................................................................575

Peer Channel in Action ..............................................................................575

 Envisaging the Solution ....................................................................575

 Designing the Data Structures...........................................................579

 Defining the Service Contracts .........................................................581

 Implementing the Service Contracts ................................................584

 Configuring the Endpoints ...............................................................585

 Directing Messages to a Specific Peer................................................587

 Custom Peer Name Resolution..........................................................590

 Seeing Peer Channel Work ................................................................595

Peer Channel and People Near Me.............................................................598

Summary .....................................................................................................598

References....................................................................................................598

Chapter 18 Representational State Transfer and Plain

Representational State Transfer ..................................................................599

REST Services...............................................................................................600

REST Services and Plain

The Virtues and Limitations of REST Services............................................601

Building REST POX Services with the Windows Communication Foundation ........602

 The Address of a REST POX Service Endpoint..................................602

 The Binding of a REST POX Service Endpoint..................................602

 The Contract of a REST POX Service Endpoint ................................603

 Implementation.................................................................................604

 A Sample Application ........................................................................604

RSS and ATOM Syndication in .NET Framework 3.5.................................609

JSON ............................................................................................................615

 A Sample ASP.NET AJAX+JSON Application .....................................616

Summary .....................................................................................................620

References....................................................................................................620

Part VII The Lifecycle of Windows Communication Foundation Applications

Chapter 19 Manageability 623

Instrumentation and Tools .........................................................................624

 The Configuration System and the Configuration Editor................625

 The Service Configuration Editor......................................................627

 Configurable Auditing of Security Events.........................................633

 Message Logging, Activity Tracing, and the Service Trace Viewer .......636

 Performance Counters .......................................................................647

 WMI Provider ....................................................................................649

Completing the Management Facilities .....................................................658

Summary .....................................................................................................659

Chapter 20 Versioning 661

Versioning Nomenclature...........................................................................662

The Universe of Versioning Problems ........................................................662

 Adding a New Operation...................................................................662

 Changing an Operation.....................................................................664

 Deleting an Operation.......................................................................668

 Changing a Binding ..........................................................................669

 Deciding to Retire an Endpoint ........................................................669

 Changing the Address of a Service Endpoint ...................................670

Centralized Lifecycle Management ............................................................670

Summary .....................................................................................................673

References....................................................................................................673

Part VIII Guidance

Chapter 21 Guidance 677

Adopting the Windows Communication Foundation...............................677

Working with Windows Communication Foundation Addresses.............679

Working with Windows Communication Foundation Bindings ..............681

Working with Windows Communication Foundation Contracts.............684

 Working with Structural Contracts ...................................................687

 Working with Behavioral Contracts..................................................689

Working with Windows Communication Foundation Services ................691

 Ensuring Manageability.....................................................................695

Working with Windows Communication Foundation Clients .................699

Working with Large Amounts of Data .......................................................705

Debugging Windows Communication Foundation Applications .............707

Summary .....................................................................................................708

References....................................................................................................709

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