Windows Movie Maker Handbook

Overview


Whether it's Graduation Day, baby's first bite of birthday cake, or your own rock video, this handbook makes it easy to create and share movies over the Web. Movie Maker software is part of the new Windows Millennium Edition operating system, and this book delivers inside insights direct from members of the Windows Movie Maker team. With it, users learn how to record audio and video source material, create storyboards, edit and arrange footage, add titles, music, sound effects, and voice-overs -- then store, ...
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Overview


Whether it's Graduation Day, baby's first bite of birthday cake, or your own rock video, this handbook makes it easy to create and share movies over the Web. Movie Maker software is part of the new Windows Millennium Edition operating system, and this book delivers inside insights direct from members of the Windows Movie Maker team. With it, users learn how to record audio and video source material, create storyboards, edit and arrange footage, add titles, music, sound effects, and voice-overs -- then store, play, or send! The companion CD-ROM comes loaded with ready-to-use audio, still images, and video content.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Explains how to combine a PC, a camcorder, and Microsoft Windows Me to make movies at home. Storyboard construction and editing styles are covered along with more technical details. The CD-ROM contains Windows Media Player 7, sample music, and title slides. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735611801
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press
  • Publication date: 11/25/2000
  • Series: Eu-Undefined Series
  • Edition description: BK&CD-ROM
  • Pages: 364
  • Product dimensions: 7.42 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.19 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 8.
Recording Video into Windows Movie Maker
  • Connecting capture devices
  • Understanding the Record dialog box
    • Quality setting options
    • Digital video controls (DV only)
  • Recording a live source
  • Recording from tape
  • Importing files

Chapter 8 Recording Video into Windows Movie Maker

The first step in creating movies with Windows Movie Maker, as you can probably guess, is to get your own videos and existing media files into Movie Maker. You can bring material in through a variety of methods such as importing existing files, like still images, audio, and video, or recording your own existing home videos to your computer. Recording videos to your computer means using your Web camera, analog camcorder, digital video (DV) camera, or VCR, along with an installed capture card, to record live or from tape directly into Movie Maker. You can have one or more of these capture devices attached to your computer. By using a wide range of different media in conjunction with some of the editing features available in Movie Maker, you can create movies that you can share by e-mail or over the Web with family and friends.

Connecting capture devices

The first step in recording with Movie Maker is to set up and configure your capture devices. These devices can include an analog or DV camera, a VCR, a Web camera, or just a microphone.

Before you can use most capture devices, you must have the correct software and drivers installed on your computer. Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition recognizes many of today’s most popular capture devices and peripherals. Many times, these pieces of hardware come with software from the manufacturer that needs to be installed before you can use the specific device. When you are installing the device, consult the accompanying documentation to make sure that the device is installed properly.

Because of the wide variety of hardware available, it is nearly impossible to list every possible configuration. However, the list below describes some of the basic capture devices and explains how to connect them to your computer. Remember, depending on the capture device and associated hardware you have on your PC, you could use none, one, or several of the listed configurations.

DV camera connected to an IEEE 1394 (FireWire) card

To get the best quality from your DV or mini-DV camera, you should have an IEEE 1394 capture card installed on your computer. When the DV camera is connected to the IEEE 1394 card, you’ll get the high-quality picture you expect from your DV camera. The IEEE 1394 card is simply a piece of hardware that passes the information to your PC. Because the data is already in a digital format, it can be read and transferred directly to your computer without altering the actual bits of the video and audio. This results in the highest-quality video that is possible when using consumer video cameras. Figure 8.1 shows an example of this connection.

Figure 8.1– Connecting a DV camcorder to an IEEE 1394 capture card. (Image unavailable)

DV camera connected to an analog video capture card

Even though you have a DV camera, you might not have an IEEE 1394 card. You can still use your DV camera as long as you have another video capture card installed on your computer. However, if you transfer video this way, from a digital device to an analog capture card, you will experience some loss in quality. This is because the data that is passed to the capture card is altered before the computer can use it. Figure 8.2a shows an example of this connection.

When you connect a DV device in this way, there are two main types of input: S-video or composite video. Both result in a loss of quality compared to using an IEEE 1394 capture card. However, if you have the appropriate connectors and your hardware can transfer either S-video or composite video, you’ll probably want to use S-video because it results in higher-quality picture and sound. Figure 8.2b shows an example of this connection.

Figure 8.2– Connecting a DV camcorder to analog composite or S-video inputs. (Image unavailable)

Analog camcorder connected to an analog video capture card

Analog camcorders include cameras that record in formats such as 8mm, Hi-8, VHS, and S-VHS. When recording from an analog camera to an analog capture card, you will not have the picture quality you would experience with a DV camera and an IEEE 1394 capture card. However, when using analog devices, you can use the software that came with your capture card to change some aspects of your video such as hue, saturation, brightness, contrast, and sound volume levels. Figure 8.3 shows a basic analog camcorder connection.

Figure 8.3– Connecting an analog camcorder to an analog capture card. (Image unavailable)

Some analog camcorders have separate video and audio connections. In this configuration, the inputs could look similar to the one shown in Figure 8.4.

Figure 8.4– Using separate video and audio connections. (Image unavailable)

Web camera connected to either USB or analog video capture card

The correct way to connect your Web camera to your computer depends on the type of camera you own. Some cameras attach to a USB port, while others may connect to your video capture card. These two pieces of hardware might be shipped together, or may have to be purchased separately. While some cameras can connect to any video capture card, some other Web cameras are proprietary, which means that you must have the appropriate capture card specified by the camera manufacturer for the Web camera to work. Consult the accompanying documentation to determine which applies to your specific Web camera.

Furthermore, some Web cameras have a built in microphone, while others do not. If your Web camera does not have a built-in microphone, you will need a separate microphone to capture sound. Plug it into the jack (often labeled Mic) on your computer or sound card. If you do not have a microphone and your Web camera does not have one built in, you will not be able to record sound without another capture device, such as a camcorder.

Figure 8.5 shows an example of possible Web camera connections. Note that your connection will depend on the type of Web camera you are using.

Figure 8.5– Connecting a Web camera. (Image unavailable)

VCR connected to an analog video capture card

With the growing popularity of video capture cards and TV tuner cards, some people are beginning to use their computers as TVs. For example, if you have cable television, you could attach a coaxial cable from the cable outlet on your wall or the cable decoder box to your VCR. To complete the configuration, you could attach the video out and the appropriate audio connections to your computer. The video out would go to the video in jack on your video capture card (possibly labeled composite), and the audio jack would go to the line in jack of the sound card.

If you have home movies that are on standard VHS tapes, this is one way to get those movies into Movie Maker.


NOTE:
If both your VCR and video capture card provide S-video connections, you can connect them with a single S-video cable to transmit both video and sound. See the documentation provided with your VCR and capture card for more information about S-video connections. S-video provides higher-quality pictures and sound than composite video connections.

Figure 8.6 shows an example of connecting a VCR to a computer video capture card.

Figure 8.6– Connecting a VCR to a video capture card. (Image unavailable)

Understanding the Record dialog box

After you have connected your capture devices to your computer, you are now ready to record your home movies or other footage into Movie Maker. This is the main feature of Movie Maker, and recording is made easy through one main starting point, the Record dialog box. So whether you are transferring home movies from a tape to your computer or using your Web camera to record a short message to send to a friend, it’s all done in one main dialog box.

Figure 8.7 shows the Record dialog box when a DV camera is not attached or detected by your computer, or when the DV camera is in Camera (recording) mode.

Figure 8.7– The Record dialog box. (Image unavailable)


NOTE:
You may not have the same devices listed as shown in Figure 8.7. As mentioned earlier, Movie Maker supports a wide variety of capture devices.

The Record dialog box provides an additional set of controls and another option if you have a DV camera attached to your computer and you switch it to the VCR or VTR mode, which is the playback mode you use to record from a tape into Movie Maker. The additional set of controls and the extra option are circled in Figure 8.8.

Figure 8.8– The Record dialog box when a DV device is attached to the computer in VCR (playback) mode. (Image unavailable)

Before recording your tapes or other material into Movie Maker, it’s important to have a solid understanding of the features provided by the Record dialog box. The following sections describe the different parts of this dialog box in detail.

Record

When recording, you can choose to record video only, audio only, or both video and audio. A majority of the time, you will probably want to record both the audio and video portions of your movies you are transferring to Movie Maker. After all, a major part of home movies includes the pictures of family and friends with dialog that shows their personality and truly captures the moment.

However, there may be times when you only want to capture the video portion of your movies because you want to personally narrate the scenes or add some other soundtrack. Let’s face it, at times the dialog captured in movies does not add to the movie, or the quality of the sound in the movie is not exactly what was expected. In this case, you could record only the video of a home movie, add the resulting clips to your current project, and then record a narration describing the depicted scenes, people, or images. See Chapter 10 for more information about recording narrations.

Video and Audio device

Choosing the correct video and audio devices is essential to recording your source material into Movie Maker. To record successfully, you must choose the correct device and the correct line inputs. If either of these settings is incorrect, your video and audio will not be recorded successfully.

Table 8.1 shows common configurations when choosing the video and audio device settings. In the Record dialog box, click Change Device to see the devices available for use and to view or change your current recording settings.


NOTE:
Remember, the connections on your machine may be different due to the variety of available hardware.

Table 8.1-  Video and audio device settings.

Task Video device Audio device Line input
Record both audio and video from analog tape. Video capture card Default audio device Line In
Record both audio and video from DV tape (DV IEEE 1394 capture card). DV camera or VCR DV camera or VCR (You will need to increase the volume of your camera or VCR to hear the audio of your movie. You will not hear the audio on your computer.) (Already selected or non-applicable)
Record both audio and video from DV tape (analog video capture card). Video capture card Default audio device Line In
Record live video and accompanying audio from a Web camera without a built-in microphone. Web camera Web camera microphone (This must be chosen as the audio device.) (Already selected or non-applicable)
Record live video and accompanying audio from a Web camera without a built-in microphone Web camera Default audio device Microphone or Mic (if you have a microphone attached to your computer)

NOTE:
Even if you do not have any capture devices, you can still use Movie Maker. However, you will not be able to record directly into Movie Maker; you can only import existing media files to use in your movies.

For current video capture devices, two basic driver standards exist: Microsoft Video for Windows (VFW) drivers and Windows Driver Model (WDM) drivers. The only difference you’re likely to see is the dialog box and the choices provided when you are configuring the device. You will know which standard your device follows by the dialog box that appears after you click Change Device in the Record dialog box. A device that uses WDM drivers will have the dialog box with the extra video Line input option if the device has multiple line inputs, whereas a device that uses VFW drivers (or a WDM device that has only one line input) will not provide this option. Figure 8.9 shows the dialog box that is displayed if a capture device uses WDM drivers and has multiple line inputs.

Figure 8.9– The Change Device dialog box for a device that uses WDM drivers and has multiple line inputs.  (Image unavailable)

The next two scenarios describe configuring a VFW capture device and a capture device that uses WDM drivers. The specific capture device connected can be a Web camera or analog camcorder.

To configure your analog video device (VFW drivers)

  1. In the Record dialog box, click Change Device. The Change Device dialog box, shown in Figure 8.10, appears.
  2. Figure 8.10– The Change Device dialog box for a capture device that uses VFW drivers.  (Image unavailable)

  3. In the Change Device dialog box, select the device you want to use, and then click Configure.
  4. In the resulting Properties dialog box, click Video Source. The resulting dialog box depends on the manufacturer of your capture device and the accompanying software.
  5. Typically, you can control recording settings such as:

    • Video connection to use.
    • Image size.
    • Standard to use, usually NTSC or PAL. NTSC is the broadcasting standard used in North America, while PAL is the European standard.
    • Image format.
    • Brightness, contrast, hue, and saturation of your video.
  6. Click OK or Close.
  7. After you have made these changes and others for the appropriate Audio device and Line input to use, click OK in the Change Device dialog box to return to the main Record dialog box and continue to specify your recording settings.

To configure your analog video device (WDM drivers)

  1. In the Record dialog box, click Change Device. For devices with multiple line inputs that use WDM drivers, the Change Device dialog box appears, shown in Figure 8.11.
  2. Figure 8.11– The Change Device dialog box for a capture device that has multiple line inputs and that uses WDM drivers. (Image unavailable)

  3. In the Change Device dialog box, select the Video device you want to use and then select the Line to use for the video. The setting you should select depends on how your camera is connected to your capture card
  4. In the Change Device dialog box, click Configure.
  5. In the resulting Properties dialog box, click Video Source. The resulting dialog box depends on the manufacturer of your capture device and the accompanying software. Therefore, you may see a name that is slightly different than Video Source.
  6. Typically, you can control recording settings such as:

    • Standard to use, usually NTSC or PAL. NTSC is the broadcasting standard used in North America, while PAL is the European standard.
    • Your camera controls (for example, pan, tilt, and so forth).
    • Settings such as brightness, contrast, hue, and saturation of your video.
  7. Click OK or Close.
  8. After you have made these changes and others for the Audio device and Line input to use, click OK in the Change Device dialog box to return to the main Record dialog box and continue to specify your recording settings.

Record time limit

The Record time limit option lets you set a maximum recording time. The value in this option is in the form of hh:mm:ss (hours:minutes:seconds). When a time limit is set, Movie Maker stops recording automatically when the time limit expires. This option is probably most helpful if you are recording long tapes, which may be one or two hours long. This lets you perform other tasks on your computer (or around the house) while your home movie is recording into Movie Maker. After the time expires, you will be prompted to name and save the resulting movie file.

If you have selected the Auto generate file check box in the Options dialog box, under the View menu, Movie Maker automatically names and saves the resulting file. The clip (or clips if Create clips is selected) is then imported into a new collection. (Chapter 9 explains how you use collections.) The actual imported video file is stored in the location specified in the Record file area in the Options dialog box. The files are saved as Tape1.wmv, Tape2.wmv, and so forth. If you chose to record Audio only, the resulting files are saved as Tape1.wma, Tape2.wma, and so forth.

The recording time limit depends on the amount of hard disk space you have available on your computer. If you set the limit for an amount of time that exceeds your available hard disk space, the time limit is automatically set according to the maximum amount of hard disk space that is available and the quality setting level that is selected. For example, if you set the Record time limit option for two hours and have specified the Medium quality setting level, but you only have one hour worth of disk space, the Record time limit box is automatically set at 1:00:00. If the content you want to record into Movie Maker requires more disk space, you have to either free up some hard disk space, choose a lower quality setting, or select another drive.

When you are recording, you need to have at least 300 MB of free disk space on your system drive, which is the drive on which the Windows Millennium Edition operating system is installed. For example, if Windows Millennium Edition is installed on drive C, this is your system drive. If the drive set in the Temporary Storage box of the Options dialog box is the same as the system drive, you will only be able to record content that can be stored on that drive above 300 MB. For example, if you have 301 MB of free hard disk space on your system drive, and Temporary Storage is set to this same drive, you would only have 1 MB available for recording. Table 8.2 shows the drive requirements:

Table 8.2-  The free disk space necessary for various drives on your computer.

Drive Free disk space on the Drive (MB)
System drive 300
Swap file 25 (always on your system drive)
Collection 50 (always on your system drive)
Non-system 0

Create clips

If you are recording a long tape that contains an hour or two of footage, navigating through the entire file to find the specific portion you want to use can be time-consuming. Selecting the Create clips option enables shot detection in Movie Maker, where a new clip is created each time an entirely different frame is detected. Clip creation and its use are described later in this chapter.


NOTE:
You can permanently turn off the Create clips option by clearing the Automatically create clips check box in the Options dialog box. If you select this option, the Create clips check box in the Record dialog box will be cleared, and your recorded content appears as one clip in Movie Maker.

Disable preview while capturing (DV only)

Digital devices, such as a DV camera or a digital VCR, consume a lot of system resources on your computer. This in turn affects the performance of your computer and the quality of your recorded videos. One way to reduce the load placed on your computer system is to select the Disable preview while capturing check box. When you select this option, you will not see a preview of your movie in the monitor pane of the Record dialog box when you are copying a tape from your DV camera to your computer. Many DV cameras have an LCD panel where you could watch your movie as it records into Movie Maker.

This option only appears when a DV device has been detected and the device is set to playback mode. If you do not have any DV devices, this option does not appear when you are recording in Movie Maker.

Take photo button

Sometimes there is a part of a movie that just seems to say it all. In Movie Maker, you can capture that single frame by using the Take photo button. When you take a photo, the resulting image is saved to your computer as a JPEG image file, and the resulting clip is imported into the currently selected collection automatically. You can then add this image to your current project.

Just as when you save a video file, the resulting JPEG still image file is saved in your My Videos folder, though you can easily change the location where the photo is saved on your computer.


NOTE:
The length of time a photo, and any other still image imported into Movie Maker, appears when inserted into a project depends on the time set in the Default imported photo duration (seconds) box in the Options dialog box. To set the default duration, type the duration for which you want your photos to appear in a project before using the Take photo button or importing other still images into Movie Maker.

Record

The final part of recording is to click the Record button to start recording your movie. After you click this button, the word Recording blinks to indicate that you are recording, and the time elapsed for that current recording appears next to it. After recording has begun, the button becomes a Stop button that you click when you want to stop recording.

Quality setting options

The quality of your final movie depends on the quality of the captuered source material. Because of this, choosing an appropriate value for the Setting options is important. A good rule to follow is to record your videos or movies by using the Medium quality or High quality settings. Remember, if you want to reduce the file size, you can always save the resulting movie at a lower quality setting after you have recorded it into Movie Maker.

The different Setting options you can choose from in Movie Maker affect the following aspects of the video and sound you record:

  • The display size of your movie when your end user watches it in Windows Media Player.
  • The number of video frames per second.
  • The video bit rate, which is the speed at which the video in your movie streams.
  • The quality of the audio in your movie.
  • The audio bit rate, which is the speed at which the audio in your movie streams.

For example, if you record your movie using the Medium quality or High quality settings, the video displays as 320 pixels by 240 pixels in both profiles; however, the High quality setting captures 30 frames per second (fps), whereas the Medium quality setting only captures 15 fps. In general, the smoothness of motion in your video increases with the number of frames per second. Also, the audio quality will be greater with the High quality setting because the audio bits stream at a higher rate than they do with the Medium quality setting. Remember, the video and sound quality of the final movie you create in Movie Maker directly depends on the quality of the original recording.

You might ask, "If the High quality setting is better, why shouldn’t I use it all the time?" Basically, the answer is disk space. A movie saved with the High quality setting consumes approximately twice as much disk space on your computer as the same content recorded at the Medium quality setting. When trying to determine which Setting option to use, consider the content or the possible content (if you are recording live from a camcorder or Web camera) of your recording.

For example, if you record a car race, you would probably want to use the High quality option rather than Medium quality. If you use the Medium quality or Low quality options, the movement of the cars might appear uneven and jerky because there is not enough information, or bits, in the video to accommodate the rapid movement of the cars. The sounds of the cars racing by will be clearer, too, if you select High quality.

Conversely, if you have a video that does not contain a lot of movement, such as a recording of people sitting and talking at a birthday party, you could probably safely use the Medium quality setting rather than High quality.

If you choose Audio only when recording your movies, only the audio portion of your movie is recorded. The profiles to save the resulting audio file change. The profiles you choose from only contain audio information; they do not contain video information because no video is saved. The settings Low quality, Medium quality, and High quality still exist; only the profile descriptions and the content saved are different. For example, if you select Audio only and choose the Medium quality setting, the profile description is "Audio for CD-quality (96 Kbps stereo)" and only audio is recorded. However, if you choose to record Audio and video, or Video only, the description for the Medium quality setting is "Video for e-mail and dual-channel ISDN (128 Kbps)" and either the audio and video, or only the video, is recorded.

For all profiles, whether you choose Video and audio, Audio only, or Video only, you’ll notice that the information below the setting also changes, such as the profile name, settings, and the amount of material you can record at that setting. The amount of time remaining is based on the amount of hard disk space you have available. Movie Maker determines this disk space according to the drive specified in the Record file area of the Options dialog box when the Auto generate file check box is selected. If the Auto generate file option is not selected, Movie Maker examines the amount of disk space on the drive specified in the Temporary storage box in the Options dialog box. This is important to know if you have more than one hard drive or if your hard disk is partitioned because you can choose which drive to save your recorded movies on.

As a general rule to follow, it is always better to choose a higher quality setting when recording. If you choose to record at a low quality setting, then save your movie at a higher quality setting, the quality of your saved movie will not increase. If you wanted to increase the quality of your saved movie, you would have to re-record the content at a higher quality setting, re-create your project, and then save your movie again at the higher quality setting.

The quality settings used during recording are the same ones used when you are saving and sending your movie. However, when saving a movie that you are going to send by e-mail or over the Web, other considerations, such as Internet connection speed and bandwidth, need to be made. For more information about choosing quality settings when saving and sharing movies with others, see Chapter 11.

Digital video controls (DV only)

The digital video camera controls let you control your DV camera through Movie Maker. They only appear when the camera is in playback mode (often labeled VCR or VTR on your camera) and connected to an IEEE 1394 capture card. Using the controls in Movie Maker lets you start and stop playback and recording from your computer. By controlling recording entirely in Movie Maker, you do not have to toggle back and forth between the controls on the DV camera and the ones in Movie Maker.

Recording a live source

Sometimes, you may want to record live into Movie Maker. For example, there are times when you might want to compose a simple video message using your Web camera and then send the brief greeting to a friend by e-mail. This is a popular use of a Web camera. Perhaps, there is another reason you want to record live. For example, you might be at a birthday party where everyone is in one area of the house and your camcorder or DV camera is connected to your computer and recording the festivities directly into Movie Maker.

If you want to record live into Movie Maker, you will need at least one of the following capture devices:

  • A DV camera
  • A Web camera
  • An analog camcorder
  • A TV tuner card (for recording TV broadcasts)

The following scenario describes how to tape a short video message for your movie. Because of the wide variety of devices that can be used to record live into Movie Maker, two of the most popular methods are described: from a camcorder (DV or analog) and from a Web camera. Both scenarios accomplish the same task, which is to create a short greeting.

To record live from a camcorder (DV or analog)

  1. Make sure your camcorder is connected to your computer properly.
  2. Switch the camera to the Camera position (or the position the camera needs to be in if you want to record). The camera should now be in Standby mode, but not recording to tape.

  3. NOTE:
    Some cameras will shut off automatically if they are in Standby mode for a certain period of time. If this occurs, switch the camera from the Camera position, to the Off position, and then back to the Camera position. This turns the camera off and then back on, so you can continue recording live into Movie Maker. With most cameras, removing the tape from the camera prevents it from shutting off.
  4. On the File menu, click Record. This opens the Record dialog box, which is described in the previous sections of this chapter.
  5. Click Change Device in the Record dialog box. This lets you select your camcorder (DV or analog) as shown in Figure 8.12
  6. Figure 8.12– The Change Device dialog box to select an analog or DV camera. (Image unavailable)

    The video device that is displayed by default is based on the last capture device you used when recording. Any new device detected by your system is selected before the previously used device. Since DV cameras are added each time you turn the DV camera on, the DV device is selected as the default video device if it is on at the time you launch the Record dialog box.


    NOTE:
    If you are using an analog camera or a DV camera attached to an analog capture card, you will see an additional Line value for the Video setting if your capture device has multiple line inputs and uses WDM drivers. If so, choose the appropriate Line, depending on the physical connection of your camera to your capture card.

    If you only have this one capture device attached to your computer and recognized by Movie Maker, the camera is selected by default and you can go to the next step.

  7. The selected Audio device depends on your camera and capture card configuration.
    • DV camera connected to an IEEE 1394 card. When you select the DV camcorder, the Audio capture device automatically changes to the camera as well; the DV device captures the video and audio of your movie.
    • DV or analog camera connected to an analog capture card. The default Audio device on your system is selected. Choose the appropriate Line. For this configuration, the Line should be Mic or Microphone if you have a microphone attached to your computer or Line in. The specific configuration depends on the particular capture devices, connections, and camera you are using.
  8. For this short clip, because it is only a short greeting, clear the Create clips check box. Because the Create clips option is cleared, the video is imported as one clip after it is recorded.
  9. Clear the Record time limit check box because you want to control the recording process. This lets you start and stop recording manually.
  10. For the Setting box, click Medium quality. The Medium quality setting is appropriate for this segment because you are only recording video that shows a person talking.
  11. If you want, click the Take photo button to capture and save a still image of yourself. In the Save Photo dialog box, name the image Myself.jpg and click OK. The photo is then imported into the currently selected collection automatically, and the Record dialog box remains open.

  12. NOTE:
    You might have to drag the Record dialog box to one side of your screen to see the imported photo clip.
  13. To begin recording, focus on your subject (which could be yourself talking), click Record, and begin recording a short 10 to 20-second greeting. This greeting can be something simple like, "Here is my vacation movie."

  14. TIP:
    After you click Record, the monitor in the Record dialog box appears empty. Wait for the video to reappear before beginning to record your video so that the beginning of your video is not cut off. If you have extra footage that you don’t want, you can later trim the unwanted portion.

    If you need to adjust the brightness, contrast, or color balance, and you are recording from an analog camcorder, use the software that came with your capture card to adjust these settings. For a DV camera that is connected to an IEEE 1394 capture card, use the controls on the camera as you normally would to get the picture and audio quality you want.

    The short greeting you record is only recorded into Movie Maker; it is not recorded to the tape in the camera. If you want to record simultaneously to tape as well, press the Record button on your camera.

  15. After you have completed your short message, click Stop to end recording. The Save Windows Media File dialog box then appears.
  16. In the File name box, type Chapter 8 Live Camera, and then click Save. The Record dialog box closes, and the clip, named Clip 1, from the short message you recorded is imported into a new collection named Chapter 8 Live Camera. The file is given a .wmv file extension automatically.

  17. NOTE:
    The file containing your recorded video is saved in the My Videos folder on your computer. It is recommended that you save your recorded movies in this folder; however, you can choose any folder on your computer.
  18. To play the short video in Movie Maker, click Clip 1, and then click Play on the monitor. The short clip plays in the monitor.

To record live from a Web camera

  1. Make sure your Web camera is connected properly to your computer and turned on.
  2. On the File menu, click Record. This opens the Record dialog box, which is described in the previous sections of this chapter.
  3. Click Change Device in the Record dialog box. This lets you select your Web camera as shown in Figure 8.13
  4. Figure 8.13– The Change Device dialog box to select a Web camera. (Image unavailable)


    NOTE:
    If you only have this one capture device attached to your computer and recognized by Movie Maker, the Web camera is selected by default and you can go to the next step. If your Web camera has multiple line inputs and uses WDM drivers as discussed earlier in this chapter, you will need to choose the appropriate Line for the camera.
  5. In the Change Device dialog box, click Configure. This opens a dialog box that lets you control the settings for your Web camera. After you have made the appropriate changes, click Close or OK in the Properties dialog box, depending on the specific button name in the dialog box.

  6. NOTE:
    The dialog box to control the settings for your Web camera depends on the type of Web camera you have. Many times, you can adjust the settings for your Web camera such as the brightness, contrast, video size, or exposure levels through the dialog box. Again, the options vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.
  7. For the Audio device setting, do one of the following before you click OK in the Change Device dialog box:
    • If your Web camera has a built-in microphone, select it as the audio device. It usually appears as the camera name with Mic or Microphone in the option name.
    • If your Web camera does not have a built-in microphone, you can still record audio if you have a microphone connected to your computer through the microphone jack. In this case, choose the audio source from your computer for the Audio setting, and then choose Microphone (sometimes listed as Mic) for the Line value, if one is listed.
  8. Before recording using your Web camera microphone or an attached microphone, check the microphone recording level. To do this:
    1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
    2. In the Control Panel, double-click Sounds and Multimedia, and then click the Audio tab.
    3. In the Sound Recording area, choose the device you are using to record the audio. This is either the microphone on your Web camera or the microphone connected to your computer using the default audio device.
    4. Click Volume to open the Recording Control. Drag the slider to the middle of the slider bar. This adjusts the volume of your recording.
    5. Close the Recording Control, click OK in the Sounds and Multimedia Properties box, and then close the Control Panel.
  9. In Movie Maker, clear the Create clips check box. Because the Create clips option is cleared, the video is imported as one clip after recording.
  10. Clear the Record time limit check box because you want to start and stop the recording process manually.
  11. For Setting, click Medium quality. The Medium quality setting is appropriate for this segment because you are only recording video that shows a person talking, which does not require a higher quality setting.
  12. If you want, click the Take photo button to capture and save a still image of yourself. In the Save Photo dialog box, name the image MyselfWeb.jpg and click OK. The photo is then imported into the currently selected collection automatically, and the Record dialog box remains open.

  13. NOTE:
    You might have to drag the Record dialog box to one side of your screen to see the imported photo clip.
  14. To begin recording, focus on your subject (which could be yourself talking), click Record, and begin recording a short 10 to 20-second greeting.

  15. NOTE:
    If you need to adjust the brightness, contrast, or color balance, click Change Device, then click Configure, and then use the software provided with your Web camera to change these settings.
  16. After you have completed your short message, click Stop to end recording. The Save Windows Media File dialog box then appears.
  17. In the File name box, type Chapter 8 Web Camera, and then click Save. The Record dialog box closes, and the clip, named Clip 1 is imported into a new collection named Chapter 8 Web Camera.
  18. To play back the clip in Movie Maker, click the clip and then click Play.

Recording from tape

Chances are if you own or have access to a camcorder, you have some home movies on tape already. One of the main functions of Movie Maker is to get these movies off your tapes and onto your computer. You can record tapes from the following sources as long as they are correctly attached to your computer, properly installed, and recognized by Movie Maker:

  • From an analog camera (for example, 8mm or S-VHS tape)
  • From a VCR
  • From a DV camera

The following scenarios describe how to transfer a complete tape of a home movie to your computer with Movie Maker. For this scenario, you will need to have some type of taped footage available to use. There are separate scenarios for transfer from analog (VCR or camcorder) and DV tape because some steps are different. Depending on your tape format, either analog or DV, complete one of the following scenarios.


NOTE:
If your DV camera is connected to an analog capture card, follow the steps for transferring movies from analog tape to your computer. Because the DV camera is not connected to an IEEE 1394 card, Movie Maker recognizes it as an analog connection.

To transfer movies from analog tape (in VCR or camcorder)

  1. Make sure the capture device you want to use is connected to your computer properly, and cue the tape to the point where you want to begin recording.
  2. On the View menu, click Options, and then click OK when you have done one of the following:
    • If you want your movie to be automatically named and saved once the record time limit (if it is selected) in the Record dialog box expires, click the Auto generate file check box, and then select the location where you want your movie to be saved. The file is automatically saved when the record time limit expires.
    • If you want to name and save the movie yourself, clear the Auto generate file check box.

    • NOTE:
      Choose the partition on your hard disk drive that has the most free disk space so you can record the full length of the tape. After the video file is recorded, you can always copy it to a different location as long as you have the disk space available.
  3. On the File menu, click Record. This opens the Record dialog box, which is described in the previous sections of this chapter.
  4. For the Record option, select Video and audio so that both parts of your video are recorded.
  5. Click Change Device to select the device to use to record the movie. In most situations, if you are capturing from an analog device such as an analog camcorder, select the video capture card that the analog camera is attached to as the video device to use.
  6. In the Change Device dialog box, choose the audio device that the camera is attached to use. You will want to select the default audio on your computer, though this again depends on your capture card.

  7. NOTE:
    Some capture cards let you record both audio and video. In this situation, you would want to select the device to which the audio cable is connected.
  8. For Line, you usually want to choose Line In as the connection. Again, because of the wide variety of capture devices and configurations, this may be different for your particular setup. The Change Device dialog box, once configured, should look similar to the one shown in Figure 8.14.
  9. Figure 8.14– Recording from an analog device. (Image unavailable)


    NOTE:
    The names of the capture devices for your own computer will be different from those shown in Figure 8.14.
  10. Click OK to return to the main Record dialog box.
  11. Select the Record time limit check box, and enter the time limit. For example, if you have a tape with one hour of footage and you want to record the whole tape, set the limit for one hour.
  12. When setting the time limit, consider setting the limit for a few minutes longer than the actual tape so the end does not get cut off if the tape runs a minute or two longer. Remember, you can always trim, or hide, unwanted parts of your movie when you edit the resulting clip in Movie Maker. Trimming and editing projects is discussed in Chapter 10.


    NOTE:
    Even if you select the Record time limit check box, you can still stop recording before the time limit expires and save the recorded portion.
  13. Because the amount of footage is quite large, select Create clips so your movie is broken down into smaller clips. This will help you find a specific clip or part of your video when you are ready to create your movie in Movie Maker.
  14. Depending on the contents of your movie, choose the appropriate Setting value. If you have the hard disk space available, consider using the High quality setting. Remember, after your video is recorded in Movie Maker, you can always save the movie you create at a lower quality setting to save disk space, but you cannot increase the quality once it is recorded into Movie Maker.
  15. In the Record dialog box, click Record. The Record button becomes a Stop button, and the word Recording blinks indicating that you are now recording.
  16. Depending on the device you are using, do one of the following:
    • If you are recording from an analog camera, switch the camera to the playback mode (usually labeled VCR or VTR).
    • If you are recording from a VCR, press the Play button on the VCR.

    • NOTE:
      When recording from a tape, click Record in Movie Maker and then begin playing back your tape. This prevents the beginning of your tape from being cut off.
  17. After the time limit has expired:
    • The movie is saved as Tape 1.WMV if you selected the Auto generate file check box.
    • You must name and save the movie yourself if you did not select the Auto generate file check box. If you choose this option, in the File name box, type Chapter 8 Analog Tape.

    • NOTE:
      You can stop recording before the time limit expires by clicking Stop in the Record dialog box. After you stop recording, the Save Windows Media File dialog box appears, prompting you to name and save your recorded video.
  18. On the camera, press the Stop button to end playback of the tape in the camera. This lets you continue recording from that point in the tape if you choose.
  19. Independent of which option you chose, the resulting clips are imported into a new collection in Movie Maker. Depending on the option you chose, the resulting collection will either be named Tape 1 or Chapter 8 Analog Tape.

To transfer movies from a DV device connected to an IEEE 1394 card

  1. Make sure your DV capture device is connected to your computer properly.

  2. NOTE:
    When you first turn on your DV camera, it must be detected by the operating system. For some cameras, this process can take up to two minutes. Therefore, you have to wait for the camera to be detected before you can record with it.
  3. Switch your DV camera to the playback position, often labeled VCR or VTR on DV cameras.

  4. NOTE:
    Make sure the DV camera is turned on before you click Record so that Movie Maker can properly detect the camera.
  5. On the View menu, click Options, and then click OK when you have done one of the following:
    • If you want your movie to be automatically named and saved once the record time limit (if it is selected) in the Record dialog box expires, click the Auto generate file check box, and then select the location where you want your movie to be saved.
    • If you want to name and save your movie yourself when the time limit expires, clear the Auto generate file check box.

    • NOTE:
      Choose the partition on your hard disk drive that has the most free disk space so you can record the full length of the tape. After the video file is recorded, you can always copy it to a different location as long as you have the disk space available.
  6. In Movie Maker, on the File menu, click Record. If your DV camera is connected to an IEEE 1394 card, one of the following dialog boxes appear:
    • If your processor speed is less than 600 MHz, the dialog box shown in Figure 8.15 appears before the Record dialog box displays.
    • Figure 8.15– The warning dialog box that appears if the processor speed of your computer is less than 600 MHz. (Image unavailable)

      If the warning dialog box shown in Figure 8.15 appears, click Yes to continue recording.

    • If your processor speed is 600 MHz or greater, the dialog box shown in Figure 8.16 appears before the Record dialog box is displayed.
    • Figure 8.16– This dialog box displays if your processor speed is 600 MHz or greater. (Image unavailable)

      In the dialog box shown in Figure 8.16, you have the option to:

    • Automatically start recording my video from the beginning of my tape. This option automatically rewinds the tape to the beginning and then starts recording.
    • Begin recording my video from the current position on my tape. This option automatically starts recording from the current part of your tape.
    • Use Default Recording Device. This option lets you manually control the recording process.
    • For this exercise, if the dialog box shown in Figure 8.16 appears, click Use Default Recording Device, and then click OK.

  7. In the Record dialog box, click Change Device. In the Change Device dialog box, choose your DV camera for the video capture device. It should already be selected as the default device. For the audio source, the same DV device specified in the Video box is automatically selected.
  8. Click OK to return to the main Record dialog box.
  9. Select the Record time limit check box, and enter the time limit. For example, if you have a tape with one hour of footage and you want to record the whole tape, set the limit for one hour.
  10. When setting the time limit, consider setting the limit for a few minutes longer than the actual tape so the end does not get cut off if the tape runs a minute or two longer. Remember, you can always trim, or hide, unwanted parts of your movie when you edit the resulting clip in Movie Maker. Trimming and editing projects is discussed in Chapter 10.

  11. If you are recording a long video segment, select the Create clips option so that your movie is broken down into smaller clips. This will help you find a specific clip when you are ready to create your movie.
  12. Depending on the contents of your movie, choose the appropriate Setting value. If you have the hard disk space available, consider using the High quality setting. Remember, after your video is recorded in Movie Maker, you can always save the movie at a lower quality setting to save disk space, but you cannot increase the quality once it is recorded into Movie Maker.
  13. To preserve system resources, select the Disable preview while capturing check box. When you are recording your video, you will not see a preview. However, if you are just playing your movie, it will still appear in the monitor of the Record dialog box.
  14. Use the controls in the Digital video camera controls area to cue the tape to the point where you want to begin recording. You can also use the controls on your DV camera.
  15. When you are ready to record, click the Record button in the Record dialog box. Your tape begins to play back and record into Movie Maker. The Record button becomes a Stop button, and the word Recording blinks indicating that you are now recording.
  16. After the time limit has expired:
    • If you selected the Auto generate file option, the movie is saved as Tape 1.WMV.
    • If you did not select the Auto generate file check box, you must name and save the movie yourself. In the Save Windows Media File dialog box, type Chapter 8 DV Tape for the File name, and click Save.

    You can stop recording before the time limit has expired by clicking Stop in the Record dialog box. After you stop recording, the Save Windows Media File dialog box appears prompting you to name and save your recorded video. Unlike recording with an analog device, playback of the tape in the DV device stops automatically when you stop recording in Movie Maker.

  17. 1The resulting clips are imported into a new collection in Movie Maker. Depending upon the option mentioned in the previous step, the clips appear in a new collection named Tape 1 or Chapter 8 DV Tape.

Importing files

You may have material such as existing photos, audio clips, or other video files stored on your computer that you want to use in your movies. You can use these files after you import them into Movie Maker. When you import a file, a clip that refers to the file is created. Clips are the basic building blocks of your movie. The combination of clips, when added and arranged on the storyboard or timeline, forms you entire movie.

Movie Maker lets you import many different file types, including the following:

  • Video files with an .asf, .avi, or .wmv file extension.
  • Movie files with an .mpeg, .mpg, .m1v, .mp2, .mpa, or .mpe file extension.
  • Audio files with a .wav, .snd, .au, .aif, .aifc, .aiff, .wma, or .mp3 file extension.
  • Windows Media-based files with an .asf, .wm, .wma, or .wmv file extension.
  • Still images with a .bmp, .jpg, .jpeg, .jpe, .jfif, .gif, or .dib file extension.

When you import a file that is not a video, the corresponding clip is stored in the currently selected collection. For example, in the scenario shown in Figure 8.17, all the clips that are not video clips would be imported into the selected collection named mountranier.

Figure 8.17– A selected collection named mountrainier. (Image unavailable)

You may also have existing video files stored on your computer that you want to include in your movie. When you import a file that contains video, such as an .avi, .mpeg, or an existing Windows Media-based file, a new collection is created and the corresponding clip or clips are imported into a new collection. The new collection is named according to the video file name. For example, if you import a video named Forest.avi, a new collection named Forest would be created with the clips containing parts of that movie file. If you import several videos at one time, a new collection is added for each video file. See Chapter 9 for information about organizing your clips and collections.

When importing video files, think about how you are going to use the video in your movie. For example, if you have a video file that you are going to edit, you would want to enable the Create clips for video files option in the Select the File to Import dialog box (and the Record dialog box described earlier in this chapter).

Figure 8.18 shows the Select the File to Import dialog box with Create clips for video files selected.

Figure 8.18– The Select the File to Import dialog box with the Create clips for video files option selected. (Image unavailable)

If clip creation is selected, Movie Maker breaks down the video file into clips. Clips are created when an entirely different scene or background is detected by a process called shot detection. When importing a video file, think about what it contains and how you plan to use it in your movie. If the video contains footage that you plan on using as a whole, such as a short introduction to your movie recorded using your Web camera, you might want to clear the Create clips for video files check box so the scene is imported as one entire clip. However, if you have a longer video file that you want to use only portions of, you probably want to enable clip creation. This makes it easier for you to find the specific clips you want to add to your movie.

Clips can be created by means other than shot detection. When a video file that has been recorded with a DV device is imported into Movie Maker, and Create clips for video files is selected, clips are created based on the date and time stamp placed in the file by the DV camera. When a Windows Media-based file is indexed and clip creation is enabled, clips are based on the file markers in the Windows Media-based file.


NOTE:
As an alternative to using the Import command on the File menu, you can click and drag supported multimedia files from Windows Explorer directly into Movie Maker. The corresponding clips are then added to your collections.

To import files into Windows Movie Maker

  1. Select the collection named My Collections. On the File menu, point to New, and then click Collection. Type Chapter 8 Import for the collection name and select this collection. This is the folder that the clips, which represent the imported source files (that are not video or movie files), are imported into.
  2. On the File menu, click Import. The Select the File To Import dialog box appears. The default location specified in the Import path box on the Options dialog box appears. This is the path Movie Maker first displays when you want to import a file.

  3. NOTE:
    If you keep all your content files under one folder, you can specify a new default import location by clicking the View menu, selecting Options, and then typing the folder name in the Import path box. This location is then automatically opened when you import files in the future.

    For exercises in this book, set your Import path to DriveLetter:\Tutorials if you copied the sample files from the CD to you computer system as mentioned in the beginning of this book. In this sample, DriveLetter should be substituted with the drive where you copied the files. For example, if you copied the Tutorials folder to your C drive, the Import path would read C:\Tutorials. All of the files used in the scenarios throughout the book are found in the Working folders for the specific chapter number under the main Tutorials folder.


  4. Locate subfolder Working under Chapter 8 on your computer. For example, if you copied the files in the Tutorials folder from the companion CD to your computer hard drive, and your hard disk letter is C, you would go to C:\Tutorials\Chapter 8\Working to find the specific files.
  5. Hold down CTRL and then click the following files:
    • MountRainier.wmv
    • Mountain1.jpg
    • Mountain2.jpg
    • Spacey.wav.
  6. Clear the Create clips for video files option so that the video file MountainRainier.wmv is imported as one clip.
  7. Click Open. The following clips are created in the Chapter 8 Import folder: Mountain1, Mountain2, and Spacey.
  8. The clip for the MountRainier.wmv video appears as Clip 1 in a new collection named MountRainier because video and movie files are imported into new collections.

  9. You can add these clips to the storyboard or timeline to create a new movie. Adding clips to your project and then editing it is discussed in Chapter 10.
  10. The next chapter discusses strategies for keeping your clips and collections organized in Movie Maker.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Dedications  Page III
Introduction  Page XI
    Who is this book for?  Page xi
    How this book is organized  Page xii
        Part 1: Moviemaking Basics  Page xiii
        Part 2: Using Windows Movie Maker  Page xiii
        Part 3: Advanced Uses for Windows Movie Maker  Page xiv
    About the companion CD?  Page xiv
    Acknowledgements  Page xv
    System requirements  Page xvi
    Microsoft Press Support Information  Page xvi
PART 1: MOVIEMAKING BASICS  Page 1
CHAPTER 1: Making Movies  Page 3
    Why editing is important  Page 3
    Telling a story  Page 4
    Home movies as art  Page 5
        History of amateur moviemaking  Page 6
        Power to the amateur  Page 6
    A new approach  Page 8
        Fred’s first film  Page 8
        Making a shooting plan  Page 9
        Moviemaking art  Page 11
        Adding an editor  Page 13
        Exploring the possibilities  Page 14
    Getting started  Page 23
CHAPTER 2: Planning Your Movie  Page 25
    From idea to concept  Page 25
        Why make a movie?  Page 25
        Who is your audience?  Page 27
        What do you want to tell them?  Page 28
        How do you want to tell them?  Page 29
    Production styles  Page 30
        Documentary style  Page 30
    Pre-production elements  Page 37
    Planning a camping movie  Page 49
        The setup  Page 49
        The concept  Page 50
        The outline  Page 50
        The plan  Page 51
    The story  Page 51
        Essential story ingredients  Page 52
    Writing a script  Page 54
        Television script format  Page 57
        Feature script format  Page 59
CHAPTER 3: Production Tools  Page 63
    Camcorders  Page 63
        Choosing a camcorder  Page 64
    Exploring your camera  Page 73
        Video basics  Page 74
        Your camera’s features  Page 77
    Lighting  Page 85
    Sound  Page 87
    Accessories  Page 89
CHAPTER 4: Production: Shooting Your Movie  Page 91
    Starting production  Page 91
        The director  Page 92
        The editor  Page 93
    Basic camera work  Page 94
        Static shot  Page 94
        Pan  Page 95
        Tilt  Page 95
        Zoom  Page 95
        Dolly  Page 96
        Pedestal  Page 96
    Your visual approach  Page 97
    Setting up a shot  Page 97
        Arranging a shot  Page 98
        Blocking  Page 98
        Composition  Page 100
        Lighting  Page 104
         Sound  Page 108
    Shooting a scene  Page 109
        Continuity  Page 111
        Shooting styles  Page 112
    Shooting the camping movie  Page 115
        Dave’s shooting plans  Page 115
CHAPTER 5: Editing Your Movie   Page 129
        Thinking like an editor   Page 131
        Learning to edit  Page 132
        Editing styles  Page 140
        The editing process  Page 143
        Editing with Windows Movie Maker   Page 148
    Editing tools  Page 149
        Video editing  Page 150
    Making cuts  Page 152
        Editing tips and tricks  Page 155
    Editing the camping movie  Page 162
CHAPTER 6: Distributing Your Movie  Page 165
    Windows Media Technologies  Page 165
        Downloading content  Page 166
        Streaming audio and video  Page 167
        Compression technologies  Page 168
        File formats  Page 169
        Windows Media Servers  Page 170
    Creating streaming content  Page 171
        Windows Media Encoder 7  Page 172
        Windows Media Player 7  Page 174
    Wrap-up  Page 178
PART 2: USING WINDOWS MOVIE MAKER  Page 179
CHAPTER 7: Introducing Windows Movie Maker  Page 181
    The Windows Movie Maker interface  Page 181
        Using the menus  Page 182
        Using the toolbars  Page 189
    Working in the collections area  Page 192
    Using the monitor and the monitor buttons  Page 192
    Using the storyboard and timeline  Page 194
CHAPTER 8: Recording Video into Windows Movie Maker  Page 195
    Connecting capture devices  Page 195
    Understanding the Record dialog box  Page 199
        Quality setting options  Page 207
        Digital video controls (DV only)  Page 209
    Recording a live source  Page 209
    Recording from tape  Page 214
    Importing files  Page 220
CHAPTER 9: Organizing Your Clips  Page 225
    Working in the collections area  Page 225
        Naming clips  Page 226
        Previewing clips  Page 228
        Working with views in the collections area  Page 230
        Changing clip properties  Page 231
    Moving and copying clips between collections  Page 233
    Strategies for organizing collections  Page 234
    Deleting a collection  Page 239
    Backing up your collections file  Page 239
    Restoring your collections file  Page 241
CHAPTER 10: Editing Your Movie  Page 243
    Adding clips to your project  Page 243
    Arranging clips  Page 248
    Copying clips  Page 251
    Trimming clips  Page 252
    Splitting clips  Page 255
    Combining clips  Page 256
    Adding transitions  Page 257
    Editing audio tracks  Page 258
    Recording narration  Page 259
    Adjusting audio levels  Page 262
    Saving your movie  Page 264
CHAPTER 11: Sharing Your Movie  Page 265
    Saving movies  Page 265
        Considering playback quality  Page 265
        Creating and saving movies  Page 267
    Sharing movies by e-mail  Page 271
    Sharing movies on the Web  Page 275
PART 3: ADVANCED USES FOR WINDOWS MOVIE MAKER  Page 281
CHAPTER 12:Working with Still Images  Page 283
    Creating custom transitions  Page 284
    Creating slide shows  Page 284
        A basic slide show  Page 284
        Adding a narration  Page 292
    Working with title slides  Page 293
        Creating animated title slides  Page 293
        More methods for creating title slides  Page 299
    Creating a stop-motion animation  Page 304
        Animation basics  Page 305
        Creating images for an animation  Page 306
        Creating an animation in Windows Movie Maker  Page 306
        Creating a slow-motion movie  Page 308
    Creating still images from your videos  Page 310
CHAPTER 13: Adding Sound Effects  Page 311
    Exploring sound design  Page 312
    Designing sound with Windows Movie Maker  Page 314
        The sound design process  Page 315
    Mixing against a production track  Page 328
        Keeping sync  Page 332
CHAPTER 14: Playing Movies with Windows Media Player  Page 333
    Getting the latest version of the Player  Page 333
    Windows Media Player features for movies  Page 334
        Playing a movie  Page 335
        Player controls  Page 335
        Player views  Page 336
        Player modes  Page 337
        Video settings  Page 339
        Video playlists  Page 343
        File markers   Page 344
    Advanced Techniques  Page 344
        Adding video to a Web page  Page 345
        Creating skins for a video  Page 346
GLOSSARY  Page 349
INDEX  Page 357
ABOUT THE AUTHORS  Page 365
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2008

    Movie Maker Class

    Any additional visual aid for my class is a great asset. I have been teaching Windows Movie Maker for several years now in Fort Wayne,Indiana @ Indiana-Purdue University at Fort Wayne, and 'off line' help is always welcome for my students. Great coaching material too.

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