Windows XP for Dummies Quick Reference

Overview

-The easy-to-navigate format provides fast answers to frequently asked questions. -Windows XP For Dummies Quick Reference is the bestselling Windows book under $15, and this newest edition helps readers save time and energy by providing answers to frequently asked questions in a quick and easy-to-navigate format. -Bestselling author Greg Harvey offers updated information on the latest version of the Windows Media Player and Movie Maker 2, changes to Internet Explorer, and new security enhancements in SP2. -Includes information on navigating the

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Overview

-The easy-to-navigate format provides fast answers to frequently asked questions. -Windows XP For Dummies Quick Reference is the bestselling Windows book under $15, and this newest edition helps readers save time and energy by providing answers to frequently asked questions in a quick and easy-to-navigate format. -Bestselling author Greg Harvey offers updated information on the latest version of the Windows Media Player and Movie Maker 2, changes to Internet Explorer, and new security enhancements in SP2. -Includes information on navigating the desktop; launching, adding, and removing programs; creating files; copying and deleting files and folders; creating shortcuts; connecting to the Internet; searching the Web; sending and receiving e-mail; plus more.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764574641
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 10/28/2004
  • Series: For Dummies Quick Reference Series
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 237
  • Sales rank: 1,029,462
  • Product dimensions: 5.88 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Greg Harvey, the author of more than 50 computer books, hashad a long career of teaching business people the use of IBM PC,Windows, and Macintosh software application programs. From 1983 to1988, he conducted hands-on computer software training forcorporate business users with a variety of training companies(including his own, PC Teach). From 1988 to 1992, he taughtuniversity classes in Lotus 1-2-3 and Introduction to DatabaseManagement Technology (using dBASE) in the Department ofInformation Systems at Golden Gate University in SanFrancisco.
In mid-1993, Greg started a new multimedia publishing venture, Mindover Media, Inc. As a multimedia developer and computer bookauthor, he hopes to enliven his future online computer books bymaking them into true interactive learning experiences that willvastly enrich and improve the training of users of all skilllevels.

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Table of Contents

Windows XP: BP-1

What You See: The Windows Desktop BP-2

What You See: My Documents BP-4

What You See: Dialog Boxes BP-5

Taskbar Table BP-6

The Basics: Opening and Closing Windows BP-7

The Basics: Creating New Folders BP-10

The Basics: Deleting Folders and Files BP-11

The Basics: Copying or Moving Folders and Files BP-13

The Basics: Exiting Windows BP-15

What You Can Do: Setting Up a Desktop Made to Order BP-16

What You Can Do: Saving Music with Windows Media PlayerBP-18

What You Can Do: Producing Movies with Windows Movie MakerBP-20

Part I: Doing Everyday Stuff 1

Adding or Removing Programs 2

Putting programs on your computer 2

Adding Windows Components 3

Taking programs off your computer 4

Setting default Windows applications 5

Arranging and Sizing Icons in a Window 6

Browsing Drives, Folders, and Files on the Computer 7

My Documents 7

My Pictures 8

Making slideshows 9

Printing pictures 10

My Music 12

My Videos 12

My eBooks 13

My Computer 14

Using the Folders Explorer bar 16

Mapping network drives 18

My Network Places 19

Network connections 20

Network Places 22

Home Networking Wizard 23

Copying (and Moving) Files and Folders 24

Drag ’em up, drop ’em down 25

Using cut-and-paste 26

Creating New Files and Folders 27

Creating a blank file 28

Compressing files and folders 28

Compressing FAT files and folders 29

Encrypting a compressed folder 30

Extracting files from a compressed folder 31

Compressing NTFS files and folders 33

Sharing folders on a network 34

Creating Shortcuts 34

Shortcuts to open stuff 35

Shortcuts to Web pages 36

Customizing the Desktop 36

Deleting Junk 37

Formatting a Disk 39

Getting Help and Support 40

Getting Info on a Disk, Folder, or File 42

Disk properties 42

Folder properties 44

Customizing a folder 44

File properties 45

Launching Programs 46

Moving and Resizing Windows 46

Naming Files and Folders 49

Long filenames 50

File icons 50

Things you do with files 51

Renaming files and folders 51

Opening Files and Folders 52

Playing Music, Video, and Movies 53

Windows Media Player 53

Audio CD-ROMs 56

Radio stations 59

Copying audio files and making CDs 60

Copying music to your hard drive 60

Creating playlists 62

Recording audio CDs 63

Video files 65

DVDs 66

Portable device 67

Printing 68

Managing the print queue 69

Installing a new printer 70

Searching for Files and Folders 73

Searching for computers, people, and Web sites 75

Searching for pictures, music, or video 76

Selecting Commands on Menus 77

Pull-down menus 78

Shortcut menus 79

Dialog boxes 79

Alert dialog boxes 82

Wizards 82

Control menus 82

Selecting Commands on Explorer Bars 83

Selecting Commands from Toolbars 84

The Address Bar 86

The Desktop toolbar 87

The Links toolbar 87

The menu bar 88

The Standard Buttons toolbar 88

The status bar 90

Resizing and moving toolbars 90

Customizing the Standard Buttons toolbar 91

Selecting Files and Folders 92

Shutting Down Windows 93

Using the Command Prompt 94

Using the Windows Taskbar 95

The Start menu 96

The Quick Launch toolbar 97

The Notification area 98

Customizing the Taskbar and Start menu 99

Customizing the Notification area 100

Customizing the Start menu 101

Switching between programs 102

Arranging windows on the desktop 103

Using Task Manager 104

Creating custom toolbars 105

Using Windows Automatic Update 106

Part II: Windows and the Web 109

Adding Web Favorites 110

Opening Favorites 112

Offline Favorites 112

Organizing Favorites 114

Synchronizing offline Favorites 116

Browsing with Internet Explorer 117

Connecting to the Internet 118

Launching Internet Explorer 118

Navigating the Web 119

Address AutoComplete 120

Saving Web graphics 120

Saving Web pages 121

Saving Desktop items 122

Printing Web pages 123

Working offline 124

Browsing with MSN Explorer 126

Searching the Web 130

Searching from the Explorer Bar 130

Autosearching from the Address Bar 132

Sending and Receiving E-Mail 132

Composing and sending messages 133

Adding recipients to the Address Book 136

Reading e-mail 138

Organizing e-mail 141

Deleting e-mail 142

Instant Messaging 143

Adding contacts 144

Sending instant messages 145

Retrieving e-mail via Windows Messenger 146

Part III: Windows Accessories 147

Accessibility 148

Accessing Your Accessories 148

Address Book 149

Calculator 149

Command Prompt 151

Communications 151

Networking 151

Network Connections 152

Remote Desktop Connection 153

Entertainment 156

Sound Recorder 156

Volume Control 157

Microsoft Interactive Training 158

Notepad 159

Program Compatibility Wizard 159

Scanner and Camera Wizard 160

Paint 160

System Tools 161

Character Map 162

Scheduled Tasks 163

System Restore 165

Windows Explorer 166

Windows Movie Maker 167

Assembling your clips 168

Editing the elements in your movie 168

Creating the final movie 169

WordPad 170

Part IV: The Windows Control Panel 171

About the Control Panel 172

Accessibility Options 173

Add or Remove Programs 174

Appearance and Themes 175

Folder Options 176

Display 176

Date, Time, Language, and Regional Options 178

Network and Internet Connections 179

Performance and Maintenance 180

Printers and Other Hardware 182

Security Center 183

Sounds, Speech, and Audio Devices 183

User Accounts 184

Glossary: Techie Talk 187

Index 191

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First Chapter

Windows XP For Dummies Quick Reference


By Greg Harvey

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7645-7464-7


Chapter One

Doing Everyday Stuff

Part I contains a pretty complete laundry list of all the essential "things to do" in Windows XP. You find out about such elementary stuff as controlling the icons on your desktop, adding and removing software and printers, regulating and dispensing with the files and folders that manage to clutter your hard drive, launching your programs, obtaining online help, and even safely shutting down the whole Windows kit and caboodle.

In this part ...

Adding or Removing Programs 2 Arranging and Sizing Icons in a Window 6 Browsing Drives, Folders, and Files on the Computer 7 Copying (and Moving) Files and Folders 24 Creating New Files and Folders 27 Creating Shortcuts 34 Customizing the Desktop 36 Deleting Junk 37 Formatting a Disk 39 Getting Help and Support 40 Getting Info on a Disk, Folder, or File 42 Launching Programs 46 Moving and Resizing Windows 46 Naming Files and Folders 49 Opening Files and Folders 52 Playing Music, Video, and Movies 53 Printing 68 Searching for Files and Folders 73 Selecting Commands on Menus 77 Selecting Commands on Explorer Bars 83 Selecting Commands from Toolbars 84 Selecting Files and Folders 92 Shutting Down Windows 93 Using the Command Prompt 94 Using the Windows Taskbar 95 Using Windows Automatic Update 106

Adding or Removing Programs

As you continue to use Windows XP, you'll undoubtedly get new programs that you need to install on your computer. Also, as time goes on, and disk space becomes more precious or newer versions of the software come your way, you may need to uninstall programs that you previously added. In addition to using Add or Remove Programs to install and uninstall application programs, you will use it to add and remove various Windows components.

Putting programs on your computer

To install a new application program from floppy disks or a CD-ROM by using the Add or Remove Programs Control Panel, follow these steps:

1. Click the Start button and then click Control Panel to open the Control Panel window.

2. Click the Add or Remove Programs hyperlink in Category view to open the Add or Remove Programs dialog box. If the Control Panel opens in Classic view (indicated by the individual icons rather than a list of categories), double-click the Add or Remove icon.

3. Put the CD-ROM in your computer's CD-ROM drive, or put the first disk in your computer's floppy disk drive.

4. Click the Add New Programs button on the left side of the dialog box and then select the CD or Floppy button to install a program from the CD or floppy disk you inserted into the drive.

5. Follow the steps outlined in the Install Program from Floppy or CD-ROM Installation wizard to install your new program.

You can also use the Run command on the Start menu to install a program from the Run dialog box. In the Open text box in the Run dialog box, type the drive letter that contains the disk or CD-ROM from which you're installing the program, followed by a colon and the name of the installation program (either setup or install). For example, to install a new CD-ROM game that uses install as the installation command, you type

d:\install

(assuming that D is the letter assigned to your CD-ROM drive; if this isn't the case, replace d with the letter your system uses) in the Open text box of the Run dialog box and then click the OK button or press Enter.

Use the Install Wizard to install all new Windows XP versions of software (also known as 32-bit versions of a program). Install programs from the Run dialog box when you install older software whose installation instructions talk about entering an install or setup command in the Run dialog box.

See also "Add or Remove Programs" in Part IV for more on using the Install Wizard.

Adding Windows Components

When you first install Windows XP (doing a standard installation), not all of the Windows accessories and auxiliary tools are installed, by any means. To install additional Windows components from the Add or Remove Programs dialog box, follow these steps:

1. Click the Add/Remove Windows Components button on the left side of the Add or Remove Programs dialog box to open the Windows Components Wizard.

2. In the Components list box, locate the category of the component( s) you want to add.

When the check box for a particular category is unchecked, that means that none of its components is installed. When the check box for a particular category is checked, but the check box is shaded (as opposed to white), this means that only some of the components in that category are currently installed.

3. To select which component(s) in that category to install, click the category icon or name to select it and then click the Details button at the bottom of the dialog box.

Windows displays a new dialog box, listing each of the individual components for the particular category. All those that are currently installed have their check boxes selected.

4. To install component(s) from the list, click the component check box.

5. After you're finished selecting components to install, click the OK button to close the dialog box and return to the Wizard Components Wizard dialog box.

6. Repeat Steps 2 through 5 for all the Windows components that you need to add. When you're finished selecting components to add, click the Next button to move to the next dialog box, where the wizard starts installing the selected components.

7. Click the Finish button when the Completing the Windows Components Wizard dialog box appears.

Be sure that you have the Windows XP CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive so that Windows can find the files for the components you selected. Note that some components require that you restart Windows XP before their new settings take effect.

Taking programs off your computer

Windows XP includes an uninstall utility that takes the pain out of removing unneeded or obsolete versions of a program from your computer. To uninstall a program installed with Windows XP (as I describe in the earlier section, "Putting programs on your computer"), follow these steps:

1. Click the Start button and then click Control Panel to open the Control Panel window.

2. In the Category view, where you see a list of Control Panel categories, click the Add or Remove Programs hyperlink to open the Add or Remove Programs dialog box. In the Classic view, where you see individual Control Panel icons, double-click the Add or Remove Programs icon.

3. Click the Change or Remove Programs button on the left side of the Add or Remove dialog box to display the Currently Installed Programs list box.

4. In the Currently Installed Programs list box, click the program you want to remove (when you click a program name, the description expands to include a Change/Remove button or separate Change and Remove buttons).

5. Click the Change/Remove button or the Remove button, if Change and Remove are separate.

6. Click the OK button in the alert dialog box that appears to confirm your removal of the program. When the uninstaller finishes removing the program, click the Close button to close the Add or Remove Programs dialog box and to return to the Control Panel window.

TIP

Use the Windows XP uninstaller to get rid of any unwanted program that you've installed with the Add or Remove Programs Control Panel. Using this utility to remove a program (rather than just deleting the program folder) ensures that all vestiges of the program are removed from the system and that you get back every byte of storage space to which you're entitled.

To remove unneeded Windows components, click the Add/Remove Windows Components button in the Add or Remove Programs dialog box and then locate and remove the check mark from the components you want removed before you select the Next button. Remember that if you remove the check mark from a category of components rather than from a particular component within that category, Windows will remove all the components.

Setting default Windows applications

New to the Add or Remove Programs window in the SP2 update to Windows XP is the Set Program Access and Defaults button. Click this button when you want to enable access to or change the default Web browsing, e-mail, media player, or instant messaging program, or to determine whether or not to use Microsoft Java Virtual Machine (abbreviated MSJVM, this is an extension of Microsoft's license to Sun Microsystem's Java source code that expires on December 31, 2007).

When you click the Set Program Access and Defaults button, the following categories, each with its own radio button and Expand button, appear:

  •   Microsoft Windows to use all Microsoft applications, including Microsoft Internet Explorer, Outlook Express, Windows Media Player, and Windows Messenger, no matter what programs you've installed
  •   Non-Microsoft to use all non-Microsoft Web, e-mail, media player, and instant messaging applications that you've installed on your computer
  •   Custom to select exactly which of the Web, e-mail, media player, and instant messaging applications installed on your computer to make the Windows XP defaults and to which to enable user access

To select a particular category to use, click its radio button. To display the actual list of applications used by each category, click its Expand button (the one with the two arrowheads, one on top of the other, pointing downward).

For the Custom category, to change default Web, e-mail, media player, and instant messaging applications and to determine which applications to grant access, click the radio button of the program you want to make the default, and click the check box to insert a checkmark for each program you want to be able to use by manually launching it from the Start menu or from a desktop shortcut.

Arranging and Sizing Icons in a Window

When browsing local files in any of three browsing windows (My Document, My Computer, and Internet Explorer 6), you can modify the size of the icons used to represent files and folders, as well as determine how much (if any) information about them is displayed.

To change the way icons appear in any of these windows, choose among the following commands on the window View pull-down menu. Note that the same menu options appear when you right-click in the window to display the shortcut menu or click the Views button on the window toolbar:

  •   Thumbnails: Changes the file and folder icons to little thumbnail sketches (each in a separate box). Use this option on folders that contain lots of graphics files, and you can use the thumbnail sketches to quickly locate the file or files that you want to use. Note that the My Pictures folder automatically selects this view.
  •   Tiles (the default): Displays the largest version of the folder and file icons, with their names to the right.
  •   Icons: Displays a smaller version of the folder and file icons, with their names below.
  •   List: Uses the smallest version of the folder and file icons, with their folders and filenames arranged in a single column along the left side of the window.
  •   Details: Adds columns of additional information (such as a description or the file type, file size, and so on) to the arrangement used when you select the List option.

TIP

Switch to the Icons viewing option when you need to see as much of the window contents as possible. Switch to the Details viewing option when you need to get as much information as possible about the files and folders in a window.

After you decide how file and folder icons appear in a window, you can also choose how they're arranged. Choose View [right arrow] Arrange Icons By, and choose among the following options on the Arrange Icons submenu:

  •   Name: Sorts icons alphabetically by name.
  •   Type: Sorts icons by file type.
  •   Size: Sorts icons by size, from smallest to largest.
  •   Modified: Sorts icons by the date they were last modified, from oldest to most recent.
  •   Show in Groups: Arranges the file icons in groups by using the current arrange option (Name, Type, Size, or Modified) so that when Name is selected, files are put into letter groups, such as A, B, C, and so on. When Size is selected, the files are put into the following groups: Tiny (up to 50K), Small (51K to 100K), Medium (101K to 500K), and Large (above 500K).
  •   Auto Arrange: Arranges icons in columns by using the arrangement option in effect (Name, Type, Size, or Modified).
  •   Align to Grid: Keeps icons aligned by snapping them to the invisible desktop grid (note that this option is available only when arranging icons on the desktop - it remains dimmed in windows such as My Documents, My Computer, and Internet Explorer 6; see "Customizing the Desktop" later in this part for details).

    Continues...

Excerpted from Windows XP For Dummies Quick Reference by Greg Harvey Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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