Windows XP Pro: The Missing Manual: The Missing Manual

Overview

With the release of Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2), Microsoft latest and most reliable corporate desktop operating system now provides better protection against viruses, worms, and malicious hackers. SP2 includes Windows Firewall, Pop-up Blocker for Internet Explorer, and the new Windows Security Center. But it still comes without a single page of printed instructions.This superbly written guide fills the gap. Coauthored by David Pogue, New York Times technology columnist and Missing Manuals creator, Windows XP ...

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Overview

With the release of Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2), Microsoft latest and most reliable corporate desktop operating system now provides better protection against viruses, worms, and malicious hackers. SP2 includes Windows Firewall, Pop-up Blocker for Internet Explorer, and the new Windows Security Center. But it still comes without a single page of printed instructions.This superbly written guide fills the gap. Coauthored by David Pogue, New York Times technology columnist and Missing Manuals creator, Windows XP Pro: The Missing Manual uses wit, technical insight, and scrupulous objectivity to light the way for first-time and intermediate network and standalone PC users. In fact, this jargon-free book explains XP's features so clearly revealing which work well and which don't that it should have been in the box in the first place.The book reveals which features work well and which don't, such as the Remote Desktop software that enables people to connect to the office from home, the encryption file system that protects sensitive information, and the Windows Messenger that enables real-time text, voice and video communication. Contents include:

  • Getting started. The book's early chapters cover using menus, finding lost files, reducing window clutter, and taming the new, multi-column Start menu.
  • Mastering the network. Special chapters help you navigate the corporate network, dial in from the road, and even set up your own small-office (peer-to-peer) network, step by step.
  • Understanding security. User accounts, file encryption, and the NTFS file system keep your private files private, while still offering network access to coworkers you specify.
  • Flying the Net. This book demystifies Outlook Express 6 for email, Internet Explorer 6 for Web browsing, and the new Windows Messenger for voice, chat, and video conferencing.
Windows XP Pro: The Missing Manual isn't for system administrators or OS theory geeks; it's for the novice or budding power user who wants to master the machine and get down to work. Yet, anyone who uses XP Pro (including hardcore techies) will find this new system much easier— and more fun—to digest with this new Missing Manual.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
You didn’t know Windows could do all this. Hey, nobody told you. But David Pogue and his colleagues will. Sure, this book’s a great, fast source for answers on the basics of running and maintaining Windows XP Professional. But it also covers cool features few Windows users use, because they’re hardly ever explained this well.

For example: how to create your own Outlook Express spam filter; why you might want to install a “fake” printer; how to collaborate on the same document across the Internet; how to encrypt your files (and what encryption won’t protect). That, and stuff like finding free anti-spyware software and creating “drop box” folders others can use to send you files for review. And loads of maintenance help: from changing drive letters to troubleshooting munged SP2 installations. Measured on pure usefulness, this one’s hard to beat. Bill Camarda, from the March 2005 Read Only

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596008987
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/30/2004
  • Series: Missing Manual Series
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 706
  • Product dimensions: 6.98 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 1.39 (d)

Meet the Author

David Pogue, Yale '85, is the weekly personal-technology columnist for the New York Times and an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News. His funny tech videos appear weekly on CNBC. And with 3 million books in print, he is also one of the world's bestselling how- to authors. He wrote or co-wrote seven books in the "For Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music). In 1999, he launched his own series of amusing, practical, and user-friendly computer books called Missing Manuals, which now includes 100 titles.

Craig Zacker has published numerous books and articles on networking topics and Windows NT.

L.J. Zacker has published numerous books and articles on networking topics.

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Table of Contents

What the Reviewers Said

The Missing Credits

Introduction

The Windows XP Desktop

Chapter 1: The Desktop and Start Menu

Chapter 2: Windows, Folders, and the Taskbar

Chapter 3: Organizing Your Stuff

Chapter 4: Getting Help

The Components of Windows XP

Chapter 5: Programs and Documents

Chapter 6: The Freebie Software

Chapter 7: Pictures, Sound, and Movies

Chapter 8: The Control Panel

Windows Online

Chapter 9: Hooking Up to the Internet

Chapter 10: Security, Firewalls, and Service Pack 2

Chapter 11: Web, Chat, and Videoconferencing

Chapter 12: Outlook Express 6

Plugging into Windows XP

Chapter 13: Printing, Fonts, and Faxing

Chapter 14: Hardware

Chapter 15: Joining, Compressing, and Encrypting Disks

Chapter 16: Maintenance, Backups, and Troubleshooting

Life on the Network

Chapter 17: Accounts, Permissions, and Logging On

Chapter 18: Setting Up a Workgroup Network

Chapter 19: Introducing Network Domains

Chapter 20: Sharing Network Files

Chapter 21: Three Ways to Dial In from the Road

Appendixes

Installing Windows XP Pro

Windows XP, Menu by Menu

Fun with the Registry

Colophon

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2005

    connecting to the Internet

    The very latest from David Pogue's eponymous publishing house [and O'Reilly]. The book goes into myriad useful tips on best using Microsoft's XP Professional. A very stable operating system, unlike some earlier efforts by Microsoft. Replete with attractive consumer level utilities. The book does go into system type aids, like showing the full power of the start menu, taskbar and control panel. All to the good. But somewhat prosaic. I suspect what is more germane to most users are things like getting onto the Internet and all that that implies. The authors go into explaining how to get the most out of Internet Explorer. And setting up your email and doing instant messaging. For many of us, browsing and email will take up much of our usage, with chat perhaps a close third. The reality is that the computer's power is often as a connection to the greater world. Which is why though these chapters are only a fraction of the book, you may want to head here first and read slowly. Understanding them may be the most productive part of the book for you.

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