Wings

Wings

by Sneed B. Collard, Robin Brickman
     
 

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Take flight!

Simple text explains the versatility of bird, insect, and mammal wings. Detailed paragraphs spotlight particular animals and discuss how the animals' wings help them to survive. Intricate, cut-paper illustrations capture the delicate beauty of each type of wing.

Includes a glossary and additional resouces.  See more details below

Overview

Take flight!

Simple text explains the versatility of bird, insect, and mammal wings. Detailed paragraphs spotlight particular animals and discuss how the animals' wings help them to survive. Intricate, cut-paper illustrations capture the delicate beauty of each type of wing.

Includes a glossary and additional resouces.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
On single- and double-page spreads, Collard explores the wide variety of creatures that have wings. He analyzes the different kinds of wings, including colors and covering, number, and use. A simple statement about wings in large type is followed by a specific example and a detailed explanation of the particular creature in smaller type. The book ends with the wings we humans use to fly. Brickman's remarkable paper sculptures both supply natural history and present the facts in sensitive aesthetic scenes. Whether creating flower petals or ladybird beetle's hard shells, tropical foliage, or a vulture's bicolor wings, she clearly conveys her subjects, like the wide variety of wings used by insects, birds, and a few mammals. Macaroni penguins are depicted in a convincing race to feed on a group of fish. We can sense the power of the loon as it thrusts itself out of the river, creating waves as it lifts off. Even bats take on an appealing appearance due to the artist's choice of posture. There is a glossary; a list of sources is also added. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

Gr 3-5- As he did in Beaks! (Charlesbridge, 2002), Sneed again presents brief surveys of animal anatomy. The colorful layouts feature a topical paragraph and a bold portrait per page, and each book showcases a variety of species. The first title deals with the types and numbers of teeth that fish, reptiles, and mammals have and how they are used. Saroff's paintings, though true to life, have a shiny quality that gives them an almost surreal appearance. Sneed's comments are a bit jocular in this volume: "The lizard's all-the-same teeth are...sharp and pointy enough to hold onto a moth or beetle until the lizard has a chance to swallow it." The second book looks at wing design and the shapes of birds, insects, and mammals, as well as at prehistoric flyers and birds that no longer fly. Human fascination with flying rounds out the discussion. Brickman's paper collages of winged animals are as impressive in texture and color as they were in Beaks . Varying in vocabulary and liveliness, from quite simple to challenging, the short chunks of information will be more manageable for a somewhat older audience than is suggested by the slim, almost picture-book format. Nevertheless, these books offer interesting facts and comparisons and should attract animal lovers.-Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The creative team that collaborated on Beaks (2002) tackles the subject of wings. Beginning with a look at the many types of animals that have wings, Collard then offers some examples of the wide diversity of wing styles-differences in size, color and covering are all explored. He presents the dynamics of flight briefly, along with ways wings can influence an animal's activities and the many things animals accomplish by using their wings. The text concludes by comparing animals' wings to the wings humans have invented to achieve flight. Font differences make the text easily adaptable to many age groups-for the very young, just a short sentence, while for older readers there is an entire paragraph of information. Every animal is labeled, and the list of resources and glossary at the back will help children learn more. Brickman's awe-inspiring artwork was created by painting paper with watercolors, then cutting, sculpting and gluing the individual pieces of each collage. The result is an amazing feast of color and texture that brings the creatures to life and helps readers see how wings work. A must-have for every library collection. (Nonfiction. 3-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781570916120
Publisher:
Charlesbridge Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
02/15/2008
Pages:
31
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
NC930L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Sneed B. Collard III has been a biologist and a computer scientist. He's put his knowledge and experience to use by writing more than thirty children's books, including MANY BIOMES, ONE EARTH; BEAKS; and TEETH. He began writing after graduating with honors in marine biology from the University of California at Berkeley. After earning his master’s in scientific instrumentation at the University of California at Santa Barbara, he continued to hone his craft while serving as a computer consultant for biologists. He lives in Missoula, Montana.

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