Winners [NOOK Book]

Overview

Even the most perfect lives can be shattered in an instant. In this moving, emotionally charged novel, Danielle Steel introduces readers to an unforgettable cast of characters striving to overcome tragedy and discover the inner resources and resilience to win at life-once again.
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Winners

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Overview

Even the most perfect lives can be shattered in an instant. In this moving, emotionally charged novel, Danielle Steel introduces readers to an unforgettable cast of characters striving to overcome tragedy and discover the inner resources and resilience to win at life-once again.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In Steel’s latest (after First Sight), Olympian hopeful Lily Thomas is injured in a freak ski-lift accident while on vacation in Squaw Valley. Her father, business tycoon Bill Thomas, refuses to accept that his talented daughter, on her way to the Ivy League, will never again walk—let alone ski. He blames Lily’s neurosurgeon, Jessie Matthews, for missing something and vows to go to the best specialists until he finds his miracle. Jessie understands how Bill feels, as she is forced to face new parenting challenges of her own when her husband is killed in a car crash the same night as Lily’s accident, leaving Jessie alone to care for her four children. Although Jessie and Bill start out as adversaries, they quickly become partners in Lily’s treatment and, as Bill plows ahead with his plans for a state-of-the-art rehab facility for kids, they become colleagues. Steel skillfully weaves the strands of the Matthews and Thomas families together in a layered story about loneliness and companionship that is marred only by stilted prose. Lily may be the patient, but all the adults are struggling with loneliness and the desire to feel important, needed, and relevant. Together, they discover friendship, loyalty, and new dreams. (Oct. 29)
From the Publisher
“Steel skillfully weaves the strands of the Matthews and Thomas families together in a layered story. . . . Together, they discover friendship, loyalty, and new dreams.”Publishers Weekly
 
“[Winners] will leave readers crying and cheering.”Booklist

From the Hardcover edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345539687
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/29/2013
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 4,121
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Danielle Steel has been hailed as one of the world’s most popular authors, with over 600 million copies of her novels sold. Her many international bestsellers include First Sight, Until the End of Time, The Sins of the Mother, Friends Forever, Betrayal, Hotel Vendôme, and other highly acclaimed novels. She is also the author of His Bright Light, the story of her son Nick Traina’s life and death; A Gift of Hope, a memoir of her work with the homeless; and Pure Joy, about the dogs she and her family have loved.

From the Hardcover edition.

Biography

When it comes to commanding bestseller lists, no writer can come close to Danielle Steel. Her work has been published in 47 countries, in 28 languages. She has been listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the author who has spent the most consecutive weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. She has not only published novels, but has written non-fiction, a book of poetry, and two series of children's books. Many of her books have been adapted for television movies, one of which (Jewels) was nominated for two Golden Globe awards. She has received the title of Chevalier of the distinguished Order of Arts and Letters by the French Government for her immense body of work. In short, to say that Steel is the single most popular living writer in the world is no overstatement.

Steel published her first novel, Going Home, when she was a mere 26 years old, and the book introduced readers to many of the themes that would dominate her novels for the next 30-odd years. It is an exploration of human relationships told dramatically, a story of the past's thrall on the present. Anyone familiar with Steel's work will recognize these themes as being close to her heart, as are familial issues, which are at the root of her many mega-sellers.

Although Steel has a reputation among critics as being a writer of fluffy, escapist fare, she never shies away from taking on dark subject matter, having addressed illnesses, incest, suicide, divorce, death, the Holocaust, and war in her work. Of course, even when she is handling unsavory topics, she does so entertainingly and with refinement. Her stories may often cross over into the realm of melodrama, but she never fails to spin a compelling yarn told with a skilled ear for dialogue and character, while consistently showing how one can overcome the greatest of tragedies. Ever prolific, she usually produces several books per year, often juggling multiple projects at the same time.

With all of the time and effort Steel puts into her work (she claims to sometimes spend as much as 20 hours a day at her keyboard), it is amazing that she still has time for a personal life. However, as one might assume from her work, family is still incredibly important to her, and she maintains a fairly private personal life. Fortunately for her millions of fans, she continues to devote more than a small piece of that life to them.

Good To Know

Along with her famed adult novels, Steel has also written two series of books for kids with the purpose of helping them through difficult situations, such as dealing with a new stepfather and coping with the death of a grandparent.

When Steel isn't working on her latest bestseller or spending time with her beloved family, she is devoting her time to one of several philanthropic projects to benefit the mentally ill, the homeless, and abused children.

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    1. Hometown:
      San Francisco, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      August 14, 1947
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      Educated in France. Also attended Parsons School of Design, 1963, and New York University, 1963-67
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

Lily Thomas lay in bed when the alarm went off on a snowy    January morning in Squaw Valley. She opened her eyes for just an instant and saw the thick snow swirling beyond the windows of the house her father had rented, and for a fraction of an instant, she wanted to roll over and go back to sleep. She could hear the dynamite blasts in the distance to prevent avalanches, and just from a glance, she knew what kind of day it was. You could hardly see past the windows in the heavy blizzard, and she knew that if the mountain was open, it wouldn’t be for long. But she loved the challenge of skiing in heavy snow. It would be a good workout, and she didn’t want to miss a single day with one of her favorite instructors, Jason Yee.

She and her father came here every year during Christmas break. They celebrated Christmas at home in Denver, flew to San Francisco where her father visited friends and did some business, mostly with venture capital firms in Silicon Valley, and then they drove to Squaw. It was a tradition Lily loved, and good skiing. They’d been coming here since she’d started downhill racing when she was a little kid. She had won bronze in the Junior Olympics three years before, at fourteen. And she was training for the next Winter Olympics, in a year. This time she was hoping to win the gold.

Lily gave a last stretch in her warm, comfortable bed and got up to take a shower. She glanced out the window and saw how heavy the snowfall was. There were two more feet of fresh snow on the ground than there had been the night before. She grinned, thinking of the morning that lay ahead. The heavy snow might slow them down a little, but Jason always pushed her hard, which was what she liked about him. She loved skiing with him, and he was more fun than her regular Denver coach, who’d been training her for the Olympics since she was twelve.

It had been her father’s idea for her to start skiing, and then racing, when he saw what a natural she was. He had loved to ski at her age. He had been mostly self-­taught, and had a passion for it, and had skied on whatever skis he could afford. After his simple beginnings in a mining town in Pennsylvania, he had made his fortune in his early twenties, speculating on the commodities market and later investing in high-­risk deals that brought enormous returns. Since then he had been investing more conservatively, and his fortune was secure and would go to Lily one day. She never thought about it, although she knew how fortunate she was. Her father always preached discipline and hard work, and Lily was a lot like him. She was an outstanding student and a talented athlete. She was a junior in high school and hoped to go to an Ivy League college. And in the meantime she trained for the Olympics every day, at a grueling pace. She had been the joy and main focus of her father’s life since her mother died when she was three. Bill Thomas lived for her, and Lily adored him.

Bill Thomas had gone to a state college in Pennsylvania. His father had been a coal miner and died when Bill was in his teens. He knew what poverty looked like at its most extreme, and all he had wanted as a young man was to provide a better life for the family he hoped to have one day. A scholarship to Harvard Business School had changed his life. He had used the MBA he earned there, and his own entrepreneurial sense, to achieve everything he had set his sights on as a boy. His mother never lived to see him graduate, and his brother had died in a mine accident at nineteen. Only Bill had escaped into a better world, and he never forgot where he came from, and what he had achieved. He was brilliant in business, and at fifty-­two, he had fulfilled his dreams, and worked at home now, managing his investments, and spending as much time with Lily as he could. He had been both father and mother to her for fourteen years, and was infinitely proud of her.

Lily showered and dressed, and appeared at the breakfast table a few minutes later, in her ski pants, thermals, and bare feet. Her long dark hair was still wet from the shower, and her father was sipping a cup of coffee, as he looked up at her with a smile.

“I was wondering if you were going to sleep in. It looks nasty outside.” As he said it, they both heard the dynamite go off again. The chairlifts weren’t moving yet, but Lily was sure they would soon, at least for a while.

“I don’t want to miss the day,” she said, putting brown sugar on the oatmeal he had ordered for her, from room service at a nearby hotel that provided food and maid service to the house they rented every year. “I love skiing with Jason, Daddy,” she said, as he uncovered the rest of what he’d ordered for her, scrambled eggs, bacon, and whole wheat toast. “I can’t eat all that,” she said, making a face.

Lily was lean and athletic and in fantastic shape, and she was as beautiful as her mother had been, with the same lavender-­blue eyes, dark hair, and creamy skin, and a wide smile that mirrored his own. Bill was as fair as she was dark and looked younger than his years. He had never remarried and had no desire to, as long as Lily was at home. He had dated the same woman for the past two years. Penny was devoted to her career, had never married, and had no children, and she traveled so much for her PR business that it never bothered her that the most important woman in Bill’s life was Lily, and most of the time he was busy with his daughter and had little interest in anyone else. He and Penny had an unspoken arrangement that worked for both of them. When they had time and were in the same city, they spent an evening together, and other than that, they had their own lives. Neither of them wanted more with each other than they had. And they had fun whenever they got together.

Penny was a good-­looking redhead, and she worked hard at maintaining a spectacular body that she had “enhanced” here and there. Bill always enjoyed having her on his arm when they went out. She was younger than he was, but not so much that he felt foolish when they were seen together.

They had even managed a couple of trips, usually to resorts she represented so she could kill two birds with one stone. He had never suggested a future to her, nor did he plan to, and she was an independent woman who didn’t seem to want one with him, or anyone else. She was forty-­two years old, and Lily liked her, and knew that Penny was no threat to her. Her father rarely in- volved his daughter in his dating life—­they spent their family time alone, as on this vacation. And during their time in Squaw, Penny was at the opening of a new resort in St. Bart’s, and Bill had never invited her to Squaw Valley with them on their annual trip. He liked spending the time with Lily—­she was so busy with school and friends, sports, and after-­school activities when they were at home. He dreaded when she’d leave for college and was trying to talk her into going to school in or near Denver, although Lily had her heart set on the Ivy League in the East, and had the grades to get in.

“Are you sure you want to go out today?” he asked, as she took a bite of the eggs and then nibbled a strip of bacon.

“They’ll probably close the mountain early. I want to get in as many runs as I can before they do,” she said, then stood up to go finish dressing.

“If it gets too bad, I want you to come in,” he reminded her. He admired her skill, and her discipline, but he didn’t want her taking crazy chances in ugly weather. But she was a sensible girl too.

“I know, Daddy,” she said with a dazzling smile as she looked over her shoulder. “Don’t worry, we’ll be fine. Jason knows the mountain better than anyone here.” It was one of the reasons why Bill had hired him years before. He wanted Lily to have fun, but he wanted her safe above all. He had lost her mother and didn’t want to lose her as well. Lily’s mother had been driving too fast the night she hit a patch of ice in Denver and died at twenty-­five, leaving Bill widowed, with a three-­year-­old child. He protected Lily as if she were made of glass.

She was back ten minutes later, with her sweater on over her thermals, ski pants, hiking boots, and her Olympic team parka and helmet over her arm. She left her skis, boots, and poles in a locker at the base of the mountain every night, and she had to take a shuttle bus to meet Jason there now. She put her parka on and zipped it up. Bill was sitting at his computer checking the commodities market, and then looked up at her with a grin.

“You look mighty cute,” he said, smiling broadly. The Olympic team parka and helmet said she was a hotshot, and they were a status symbol on any slope. Just looking at her, he was proud of her all over again. “And come in if the weather gets any worse,” he reminded her, and she bent to kiss him on the top of his head on her way out.

“We will,” she said happily, and waved her gloves at him from the doorway, and then she was off to get in as much skiing as she could before the mountain closed. He was sure it would by midday, and so was she.

He stood up and watched her from the window, and saw her get on the shuttle bus to the base. She didn’t see him, and he felt his heart tug as he gazed at her. She was so beautiful and so young, and she looked so much like her late mother they could have been sisters. It still tore his heart out sometimes. She would have been thirty-­nine years old if she were still alive, which was hard to imagine. In his mind, she would be young forever, hardly older than Lily was now at seventeen. He went back to his computer then, and hoped that Lily would come in early. The snow seemed to be getting worse, and he knew there would be a veil of fog at the top of the mountain. Only the worst diehards would venture out today, like Lily. She had her mother’s looks but her father’s grit, stubbornness, and determination. Because of it, Bill was sure that her skill and relentless training would win her the gold in the next Olympics.

While riding the shuttle to the base, she had time to text her boyfriend Jeremy and best friend Veronica. Both were on the ski team with her, and were practicing in Denver that day. She had no time to make friends with anyone who wasn’t on the Olympic team, and she and Veronica had known each other since nursery school. Jeremy answered her with a quick “I love you.” Veronica didn’t answer, and Lily guessed she was still asleep.

Lily met Jason, as promised, at the lockers. He was wearing his ski school jacket, and next to her Olympic team gear, they looked very official, as they put their skis and boots on, left their shoes in a locker, grabbed their poles, and headed toward the lift. They were both wearing goggles in the heavy snow. Jason glanced at her with a grin, as they showed their passes to the chairlift operator and he nodded. There were three other people waiting for the lift ahead of them, and it had just started operating only minutes before. Two others were already high in the air on the chairs as Lily glanced at them. It was exhilarating to be out on a day like this, and she loved the challenge of skiing through the heavy snow. Jason admired that about her—­nothing ever stopped her.

“You either have to be crazy to go out on a day like this,” Jason said, laughing, “or very young, or both. I don’t think the mountain will be open long.” But they both knew it was safe, if the chairlift was operating, otherwise they’d have closed it down. And only the most skilled would brave the mountain today, and she and Jason both qualified for that. He was an astounding skier, and so was she. He had won national championships at her age, and he was an excellent teacher too. She always learned something new from him, which added to what she learned from her Denver coach, who was a taskmaster.

“I guess that means I’m crazy,” Lily said happily. “My dad thinks we’re nuts too.” They could hear the dynamite blasting again, as Lily got on the first available chairlift, and Jason waited for the next one, right behind her. Lily felt the same thrill she always did, as the chairlift went high in the air, and she looked down at the trees and virgin snow. There was not a single skier yet on the slopes, and she could tell that part of the mountain was closed as they headed toward the top. The wind was whipping her face, and she enjoyed the peaceful silence as the chairlift hummed along, and then she heard another crack of dynamite, unusually close by. It sounded like they were right next to it, which surprised her, and at exactly the same moment, as they approached a ravine, from a great height, she saw a long snake whip through the air, like a giant rope above their heads. She looked up at it and felt her- self falling fast at the same time. She didn’t even have time to understand that the cable that held the chairlift had just broken, as she plummeted down, into a deep hole in the snow. When she landed, all she saw was white, and her eyes closed as she fell into a deep sleep. She never had time to turn and look at Jason, while they free-­fell past the trees, and he landed in the ravine. Jason was dead the minute he hit the snow.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 89 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 89 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 4, 2013

    OMG IS ALL I CAN SAY ITS GREAT VERY FAST READING & A DEFINIT

    OMG IS ALL I CAN SAY ITS GREAT VERY FAST READING & A DEFINITE PAGE TURNER/ I STAYED UP TWO NIGHTS TILL
    2:30 & FINISHED IT NOW I'M MAD AT MY SELF BECAUSE NOW I HAVE TO FIND ANOTHER GREAT BOOK/ HAPPY READYING 
    U WILL ENJOY IT AS MUCH AS I DID / (NOW MY 83 YR OLD MOM IS READING IT ON HER NEW NOOK) LOL 

    15 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2013

    Excellent

    A fast read Great storyline and different for DS Enjoy!

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2013

    Better than the last

    I read this in two days and enjoyed it. I felt it was a bit different for Danielle Steele to write of the physically impaired and found it interesting. It was not just another anticipated love story to include a wealthy family as had been expected. I will recommend this book.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2013

    highly recommended

    enjoyed it from beginning to end.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2013

    Touching read.

    As a skier the book had very personal moments in it for me. The story is very predictable and familiar. It reminded me of Jill Kinmont who was an Olympic skier in the '50's and had a ski related accident leaving her paralyzed. It was an enjoyable read overall.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2014

    Recommend. Very entertaining

    I enjoy almost all of Danielle Steel. I have read almost all of her books and have only been slightly disappointed in a couple.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    Wonderful

    Another wonderful story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2014

    Great book about overcoming adversity

    I loved this book. There are many ways to become a winner and the most rewarding are when someone overcomes their own adversities. Great read for all ages

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2014

    Highly Recommended!

    Loved the story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2014

    Highly Recommended

    Great book. I could not put it down. I was sorry when I came to the end. I wanted to read more.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2014

    WINNERS is one of the best books I have ever read! I wish Daniel

    WINNERS is one of the best books I have ever read! I wish Danielle Steele could make a sequel of later in their loves. I had a tough time putting the book down to get some sleep! Absolutely loved it! I don't know what to read now!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2014

    I am 81 years old and really did enjoy reading Winners. It is o

    I am 81 years old and really did enjoy reading Winners. It is one of her best books. GREAT READING.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2014

    Recommend for relaxing reading

    Perfect book to have on a weekend to relax

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 18, 2014

    recommended for light reading

    I like Danielle's books because they are light reading. Can read at bedtime til sleepy and not feel I cannot put it down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2014

    Great Read, Have The Tissues Handy.  Its written like she use to

    Great Read, Have The Tissues Handy.  Its written like she use to write.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2014

    Great read.

    By far her best book ever.I could not put this book down.A fantastic read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2013

    And,and,and

    I thoutght the story line was good but the excessive use of the word 'AND' is in my opinion lazy writing. I actually found myself counting the number of times 'and' was used per page. On many it was between 10-14.

    So for me: good story but hard to force myself to keep reading.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2013

    Another grest read from danielle steer

    Winners is very uplifting and hopeful...

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2013

    Written like a child

    I like DS but was highly disappointed with the writing style. It was written as if a young teen wrote it. I think her teacher would have given her lots of red marks for redos! I hate to be so critical but I expected much better writing from someone so accomplished.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2014

    Winner

    Good book the normal danielle steele beautiful people tragic happens but all good stuff starts to happen.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 89 Customer Reviews

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