Winning the Long War: Retaking the Offensive against Radical Islam

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Overview

Winning the Long War is a trenchant examination of the past seven years of the Global War on Terror, the future battlegrounds that will confront the United States in the struggle against radical Islam in the years ahead, and how America can reclaim the initiative in what has become the defining struggle of the twenty-first century. Middle East expert Ilan Berman offers new thinking on counterterrorism strategy and provides the new administration with ways to close the gaps in current American counterterrorism strategy. While there are many books about fighting terrorism, none offer Berman's approach of integrating diplomatic, legal, economic, military, and theoretical strategies into a comprehensive national security action plan. Using cutting edge analysis of current terrorism trends, Winning the Long War identifies three central failings that triggered the West's retreat and radical Islam's simultaneous advance: the failure to properly define the enemy, the inability to dominate the battlefields, and the inability to calibrate counterterrorism strategies. Demonstrating the need for more creative thinking about the nature of the conflicts in which the West now finds itself, this book lays out the steps that must be taken to win the long war.
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Editorial Reviews

The Washington Times, July 17, 2009 - James S. Robbins
Mr. Berman has written a compact, swift-moving book in which he seeks to set the agenda for future strategic frameworks that will better address both the root causes of Islamic radicalism and the ongoing struggles we face with its most dogmatic and violent adherents.
Mr. Berman has done great work in identifying the gaps in American strategy and proposing some solutions, and policymakers would do well to consider them. The book does not (nor does it claim to) have all the answers, but it asks all the right questions.
The Jerusalem Post - Jonathan Schanzer
The book lays out a must-read plan for tackling some of America's thorniest foreign policy challenges. . . . It is an excellent review of the challenges we have faced since the fall of the World Trade Center towers in 2001, and a succinct synopsis of the prevailing diplomatic and military thinking on how ultimately to win the war.
The Huffington Post
Ilan Berman's new book, Winning the Long War, Retaking the Offensive Against Radical Islam , catalogues American successes and failures to defeat radical Islam post-9/11. In its quiet, meticulously researched way, it is a powerful call to action in the war against radical Islam-especially the war of ideas.
October 2009 Comparative Strategy
Berman's chapter titled "Messaging to the (Muslim) Masses" is a damining, and convincing, indictment of US public diplomacy in the Islamic world. . . . Winning the Long War is a valuable contribution to the policy literature, containing many ideas that merit further discussion and exploration. Moreover, its brevity makes it accessible even for those with little time for reading. It is to be hoped that many policymakers, academics, and others will do so.
The Humanist
Our country has been waiting for a creative yet realistic approach to foreign policy. One Middle East expert, Ilan Berman, has developed a moderate, non-polemic approach with his new book, Winning the Long War: Retaking the Offensive against Radical Islam . . . His suggestions merge military, diplomatic, economic, theoretical, and legal strategy into an easily readable blueprint that outlines the 'vastness' of our national security plan in an ultimately bipartisan manner. . . No matter what your politics are on issues such as national security, you will find that this book actually offers a non-apologist, non-obstructionist view of how the United States may go about winning the long war. I might be too hopeful a citizen, but Berman's thoroughly less militarized approach to the war on terror may help re-establish not only this country's safety, but also perhaps its honor.
The Far Eastern Economic Review
Ilan Berman . . . goes straight to the philosophical nub of the problem. . . . Mr. Berman provides a compelling argument that it is time for the U.S. to enter the debate, not with a megaphone but with a steady voice, and back its ideas with money and sustained commitment.
Thomas J. Ridge
The struggle against radical Islam is not limited to al-Qaeda or confined to Afghanistan and Iraq. The enemy is global. The challenge is multi-generational. The outcome remains uncertain. Ilan Berman argues persuasively that our strategic approach must be revisited and the rules of engagement changed. He offers a provocative, insightful, and scholarly blueprint for defeating the enemy in the intellectual, economic, diplomatic, and political theaters of this confrontation.
Jon Kyl
Berman is right when he writes that military force alone will not be enough to defeat this enemy; we must also employ economic and ideological tools. Sadly, when we have used these tools, we have usually failed to do so effectively. Winning the Long War shows policymakers across the political spectrum what to do to win this war.
Brad Sherman
Berman offers a complete and coherent strategy for the so-called Long War, a struggle against radical Islam that will last decades. Most importantly, he has put forth a vision for countering our adversaries by demonstrating to their target audience that the jihadist ideology is an illegitimate interpretation of Islam and offers a bankrupt future. Very few writing in this area have tied together all the elements of a successful counter-terrorism strategy—political, diplomatic, law enforcement and especially economic. Berman has.
Robert C. McFarlane
Islam is undergoing what once in America was called a 'revival,’ the outcome of which will determine whether the overwhelming majority of moderate Muslims remain so. This global struggle for the heart and soul of Islam bodes fair to change the course of history—and thus far we in the West are losing. In this absorbing and rigorous examination of where we stand in this battle of ideas, Ilan Berman documents an alarming litany of failures on our side. The power of this remarkable book lies, however, in Berman’s prescriptions which, if adopted, are a basis for optimism that it’s not too late. Read it.
November 2009 The Far Eastern Economic Review
Ilan Berman . . . goes straight to the philosophical nub of the problem. . . . Mr. Berman provides a compelling argument that it is time for the U.S. to enter the debate, not with a megaphone but with a steady voice, and back its ideas with money and sustained commitment.
November-December 2009 The Humanist
Our country has been waiting for a creative yet realistic approach to foreign policy. One Middle East expert, Ilan Berman, has developed a moderate, non-polemic approach with his new book, Winning the Long War: Retaking the Offensive against Radical Islam . . . His suggestions merge military, diplomatic, economic, theoretical, and legal strategy into an easily readable blueprint that outlines the 'vastness' of our national security plan in an ultimately bipartisan manner. . . No matter what your politics are on issues such as national security, you will find that this book actually offers a non-apologist, non-obstructionist view of how the United States may go about winning the long war. I might be too hopeful a citizen, but Berman's thoroughly less militarized approach to the war on terror may help re-establish not only this country's safety, but also perhaps its honor.
The Jerusalem Post
The book lays out a must-read plan for tackling some of America's thorniest foreign policy challenges. . . . It is an excellent review of the challenges we have faced since the fall of the World Trade Center towers in 2001, and a succinct synopsis of the prevailing diplomatic and military thinking on how ultimately to win the war.
— Jonathan Schanzer, Former US Treasury Intelligence Analyst, Deputy Editor of the Jewish Policy Center
Publishers Weekly

Berman (Tehran Rising), vice president for policy at the American Foreign Policy Council, offers a comprehensive strategy for reclaiming "the offensive" in the "global war on terror." He expresses optimism cautiously, but warns that the gains-especially in Afghanistan-are tenuous and that the U.S. risks losing the initiative to the terrorists. He proposes a broad approach that emphasizes the political, economic and legal fronts in this long war, cautioning-as has Defense Secretary Robert Gates-that "the military should not... be the tip of the spear." As concerned with Iran as with al-Qaeda, the author recommends an array of tactics-some more hopeful than helpful-including political outreach, an Iranian embargo, educational assistance, updated laws of war and disrupting terrorist fund-raising. There is much of interest, although the main thrust of Berman's argument-the need for a comprehensive counterterrorism strategy-is the new conventional wisdom. Nevertheless, Berman's careful analysis and thoughtful conclusions are a welcome addition to the ongoing debate about the way forward . (Aug.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742566194
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/16/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 144
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Ilan Berman is Vice President for Policy at the American Foreign Policy Council. He has written extensively on the Middle East and is author of Tehran Rising: Iran's Challenge to the United States, coeditor (with J. Michael Waller) of Dismantling Tyranny: Transitioning Beyond Totalitarian Regimes, and editor of Taking on Tehran: Strategies for Confronting the Islamic Regime. Berman is an adjunct professor at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C., and editor of The Journal of International Security Affairs. As an expert on regional security and foreign policy in the Middle East, Central Asia, and the Russian Federation, he has consulted for both the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and the U.S. Department of Defense.
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Table of Contents


Foreword
Introduction
Chapter 1. Fighting Smarter
Chapter 2. Wanted: An Ideological Offensive
Chapter 3. Messaging to the (Muslim) Masses
Chapter 4. Economic Area Denial
Chapter 5. Weaponizing International Law
Chapter 6. Strategic Democratization
Conclusion
Index
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