Winning the Peace: The Marshall Plan and America's Coming of Age as a Superpower

Winning the Peace: The Marshall Plan and America's Coming of Age as a Superpower

by Nicolaus Mills
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Politicians of every stripe frequently invoke the Marshall Plan in support of programs aimed at using American wealth to extend the nation's power and influence, solve intractable third-world economic problems, and combat world hunger and disease. Do any of these impassioned advocates understand why the Marshall Plan succeeded where so many subsequent aid plans have

Overview

Politicians of every stripe frequently invoke the Marshall Plan in support of programs aimed at using American wealth to extend the nation's power and influence, solve intractable third-world economic problems, and combat world hunger and disease. Do any of these impassioned advocates understand why the Marshall Plan succeeded where so many subsequent aid plans have not? Historian Nicolaus Mills explores the Marshall Plan in all its dimensions to provide valuable lessons from the past about what America can and cannot do as a superpower.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

During the spring of 1947, Secretary of State George C. Marshall promulgated what would come to be known as the Marshall Plan: a proposal to spend up to $20 billion to restore the infrastructure and economies of Europe, then still foundering in recession and poverty after the ravages of WWII. As Mills, American studies professor at Sarah Lawrence, shows in this elegant study, the plan not only offered relief but brought about a degree of European unity by forcing countries to work in concert to mend their fractured continent. The U.S. mostly refrained from influencing specific solutions, an approach that Mills argues the present administration should think about adopting today. The plan worked to the advantage of the United States as much as it worked to the advantage of noncommunist Europe: much of the economic aid supplied was to be used to purchase American merchandise, and legislation required that this merchandise travel on U.S. merchant vessels. Six years after Marshall's first proposal, the U.S. had invested some $13 billion, and virtually all of Western Europe stood restored. This overview covers a complex subject straightforwardly and well. (Feb.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
School Library Journal

Tracing the history and intended goals of the Marshall Plan (1947)-named for its primary creator, Secretary of State George C. Marshall-Mills passionately argues that it was a successful nation-building tool that offers many lessons for the United States today. According to Mills (American studies, Sarah Lawrence Coll.), Marshall emphasized that American aid after World War II should not be used against nations but against "forces that deprived people of their dignity." His goal was to help revive the economies of Europe, creating stable political and social units that would facilitate the existence of free institutions. In this, Mills declares the Marshall Plan a success in that it supplied Europe with "a crucial margin of aid" that enabled it to recover without slashing needed welfare programs or reducing wages. In other words, the Marshall Plan was Europe's New Deal, providing the foundation for a stable Europe that would include Germany in its economic center. Well written, engaging, and likely to be considered controversial owing to its praise of the plan, Mill's book should promote discussion, especially in light of current events. Recommended for academic and larger public library collections.
—Patti C. McCall

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From the Publisher
* Tracing the history and intended goals of the Marshall Plan (1947)—named for its primary creator, Secretary of State George C. Marshall—Mills passionately argues that it was a successful nation-building tool that offers many lessons for the United States today. According to Mills (American studies, Sarah Lawrence Coll.), Marshall emphasized that American aid after World War II should not be used against nations but against "forces that deprived people of their dignity." His goal was to help revive the economies of Europe, creating stable political and social units that would facilitate the existence of free institutions. In this, Mills declares the Marshall Plan a success in that it supplied Europe with "a crucial margin of aid" that enabled it to recover without slashing needed welfare programs or reducing wages. In other words, the Marshall Plan was Europe's New Deal, providing the foundation for a stable Europe that would include Germany in its economic center. Well written, engaging, and likely to be considered controversial owing to its praise of the plan, Mill's book should promote discussion, especially in light of current events. Recommended for academic and larger public library collections.
—Patti C. McCall, AMRI, Albany, NY (Library Journal, February 15, 2008)

During the spring of 1947, Secretary of State George C. Marshall promulgated what would come to be known as the Marshall Plan: a proposal to spend up to $20 billion to restore the infrastructure and economies of Europe, then still foundering in recession and poverty after the ravages of WWII. As Mills, American studies professor at Sarah Lawrence, shows in this elegant study, the plan not only offered relief but brought about a degree of European unity by forcing countries to work in concert to mend their fractured continent. The U.S. mostly refrained from influencing specific solutions, an approach that Mills argues the present administration should think about adopting today. The plan worked to the advantage of the United States as much as it worked to the advantage of noncommunist Europe: much of the economic aid supplied was to be used to purchase American merchandise, and legislation required that this merchandise travel on U.S. merchant vessels. Six years after Marshall’s first proposal, the U.S. had invested some $13 billion, and virtually all of Western Europe stood restored. This overview covers a complex subject straightforwardly and well. (Feb.) (Publishers Weekly, November 26, 2007)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781620458686
Publisher:
Turner Publishing Company
Publication date:
01/01/2008
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
290
Sales rank:
962,019
File size:
523 KB

Meet the Author

Nicolaus Mills is a professor of American Studies at Sarah Lawrence College, an editorial board member of Dissent, and a contributor to the American Prospect, the New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >