Winning the War for Talent in Emerging Markets: Why Women Are the Solution

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Overview


The war for talent is heating up in emerging markets. Without enough “brain power,” multinationals can’t succeed in these markets. Yet they’re approaching the war in the wrong way—bringing in expats and engaging in bidding wars for hotshot local “male” managers.

The solution is hiding in plain sight: the millions of highly educated women surging into the labor markets of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and the United Arab Emirates. Increasingly,...

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Winning the War for Talent in Emerging Markets: Why Women Are the Solution

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Overview


The war for talent is heating up in emerging markets. Without enough “brain power,” multinationals can’t succeed in these markets. Yet they’re approaching the war in the wrong way—bringing in expats and engaging in bidding wars for hotshot local “male” managers.

The solution is hiding in plain sight: the millions of highly educated women surging into the labor markets of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and the United Arab Emirates. Increasingly, these women boast better credentials, higher ambitions, and greater loyalty than their male peers.

But there’s a catch: Attracting and retaining talented women in emerging economies requires different strategies than those used in mature markets. Complex cultural forces – family-related “pulls,” such as daughterly duties to parents and in-laws, and work-related “pushes,” such as extreme hours and dangerous commutes – force women to settle for dead-end jobs, switch to the public sector, or leave the workforce entirely.

In Winning the War for Talent in Emerging Markets, Sylvia Ann Hewlett and Ripa Rashid analyze these forces and present strategies for countering them, including:

• Sustaining ambition through stretch opportunities and international assignments
• Combating cultural bias by building an infrastructure for female leadership (networks, mentors, sponsors)
• Introducing flexible work arrangements to accommodate family obligations
• Providing safe transportation, such as employer-subsidized taxi services

Drawing on groundbreaking research, amplified with on-the-ground examples from companies as diverse as Google, Infosys, Goldman Sachs, and Siemens, this book is required reading for all companies seeking to strengthen their talent pipeline in these rich and expanding markets.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Hewlett and Rashid make a powerful case that companies keen to recruit and develop these women should help them manage specific challenges they face, such as safety when travelling or responsibility for the care of ageing relatives… the book offers useful lessons in how big business can do better.” — BusinessDay

In Winning the War for Talent in Emerging Markets, [Sylvia Ann Hewlett and Ripa Rashid ] debunk the stereotypes of the oppressed Arab woman, the bikini-clad Brazilian, the Bollywood heroine, and the adoring Asian wife, and focus instead on well-educated women determined to achieve in their careers.” – Global Business and Organizational Excellence

“…this book is a fascinating examination of the lives of women in these very complex and fast-changing societies, and should appeal to anyone interested in attracting and keeping women employees who have different cultural and personal pulls than their male counterparts in every society.” – Jack Covert, 800 CEO READ

“I highly recommend the thought provoking and well researched book…to any business leaders who are actively recruiting and hiring talented employees in the developing world. This book demonstrates the competitive advantage that any company will discover by hiring and retaining the highly educated and ambitious women of the emerging economies.” – Wayne Hurlbert, Blog Business World

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781422160602
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press
  • Publication date: 8/30/2011
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 1,378,124
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author


Sylvia Ann Hewlett, economist and author of 10 high-profile books, is the founding president of the Center for Work-Life Policy and the chair of the Hidden Brain Drain Task Force – a group of 60 global companies and organizations committed to fully realizing female and multicultural potential. Ripa Rashid is a senior vice president of the Center for Work-Life Policy and has over 15 years’ experience as a management consultant in North America, Europe, Latin America and Asia.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction: In Plain Sight 1

Part 1 The Changing Face of Talent

1 Unprecedented Advantages 15

2 Pitfalls and Trip Wires 29

Part 2 The Markets

3 Brazil 57

4 Russia 77

5 India 99

6 China 117

7 United Arab Emirates 143

Part 3 Action Agenda

8 Becoming a Talent Magnet 165

9 Claiming and Sustaining Female Ambition 183

10 Dealing with Pulls and Pushes 209

Conclusion: The Leapfrog Opportunity 229

Appendix 241

Notes 253

Index 265

About the Authors 275

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 24, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The prevailing stereotype of women in developing nations as vict

    The prevailing stereotype of women in developing nations as victimized, submissive and unschooled is simply not true. In fact, women in Brazil, Russia, India, China (the BRIC nations) and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) are graduating from universities in growing numbers that rival and often surpass those of men. These educated women represent a rich talent pool for businesses looking to expand in emerging markets. However, females continue to face societal pressure and organizational discrimination in their cultures. Multinationals that help these women overcome cultural restrictions and biases that thwart their aspirations will gain access to a wealth of talent. Economist Sylvia Ann Hewlett and management consultant Ripa Rashid make a strong case for nurturing this highly qualified female workforce. getAbstract finds their research essential reading for managers looking to hire and operate in emerging economies.

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