Winslow Homer

Winslow Homer

by Nicolai Cikovsky Jr., Franklin Kelly
     
 

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This book discusses and reproduces more than two hundred paintings, watercolors, and drawings that span Winslow Homer's career, focusing not only on Homer's masterpieces in various media but also on the suites of works on the same subject that reflect the artist's essentially modern practice of thinking and working serially and thematically.
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Overview

This book discusses and reproduces more than two hundred paintings, watercolors, and drawings that span Winslow Homer's career, focusing not only on Homer's masterpieces in various media but also on the suites of works on the same subject that reflect the artist's essentially modern practice of thinking and working serially and thematically.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Instead of Winslow Homer as unvarnished, naive democrat, an artist divorced from the intellectual life of his times, Cikovsky gives us a painter who was a modernist in his detachment, anxiety and impersonality. Plunging into New York City's seething cultural milieu in the 1860s, the Boston-born illustrator joined a loose artistic circle that included jounalist Eugene Benson, whose programmatic call for a modern, national, indigenous art struck a chord in Homer. But disillusionment set in with the corrupt Gilded Age of the 1870s, and Homer took refuge in art, plumbing nature's elemental power in his seascapes, and investigating the act of seeing in vibrant, spontaneous watercolors of the tropics or the Maine coast. His later paintings grasp death with almost mystical immediacy. Curator of American art at the National Gallery, Cikovsky lays bare new worlds of meaning in this immensely rewarding, superbly illustrated reassessment. (July)
Donna Seaman
Winslow Homer (18361910) was in the news as a comprehensive retrospective of his magnificent paintings and watercolors opened at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., an exhibition that will live on between the covers of this spectacular volume. Cikovsky and Kelly, curators at the National Gallery, present a contextually rich and vibrant analysis of Homer's life and groundbreaking work. A self-taught artist with an "almost sensuous love of paint," Homer, like so many of his contemporaries, was deeply affected by the Civil War. His early illustrations and paintings demonstrate his "technical strength and assurance; color, modeling, and drawing; truthfulness, and lack of sentimentality," qualities he would elevate to new levels as he moved on to paint candid scenes of everyday life. There is an earthy grace to his dignified, hardworking figures, many of whom gaze contemplatively out into the distance, a gaze not unlike that of the artist himself. The authors track Homer's major themes, all of which are intrinsically connected to place, and discuss the progression from ideology to aesthetics, from shimmering pastoral romance to dark and stormy seas. Homer was a master not only of technique but also of interpreting light, motion, and our complex relationship with nature.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780300065558
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Publication date:
09/28/1995
Pages:
420
Product dimensions:
10.68(w) x 12.18(h) x 1.45(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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