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Winter Gardening
     

Winter Gardening

by Steve Bradley, Marcus Harpur (Other), Marcus Harpur (Photographer)
 
The onset of winter usually means the end of the garden; tools go into the shed , and brooding gardeners retreat and wait for spring. But as autumn crunches into winter, there are lots of exciting ideas and projects that can keep you active as the first glisten of frost transforms your garden into a sparkling quilt. Winter Gardening is a collection of 24 original

Overview

The onset of winter usually means the end of the garden; tools go into the shed , and brooding gardeners retreat and wait for spring. But as autumn crunches into winter, there are lots of exciting ideas and projects that can keep you active as the first glisten of frost transforms your garden into a sparkling quilt. Winter Gardening is a collection of 24 original projects for gardeners who want to work in and enjoy their gardens year-round.

Winter Gardening is a collection of original ideas and projects for those gardeners who want to productively use the four months of "sleep time" between autumn and the coming of spring. Wintertime provides a "cool down" period for the garden - where plants can rest and pests and diseases can easily be rooted out - and where one can see the garden in its most basic, truest form. From this, one can make major decisions as to what the garden will look like in the coming year - and have the time to do it! Chapters include: Design a Winter Garden, Winter Harvests, Winter Flowers, Fruits of the Season, Fragrances, Trees in the Winter Garden, Jobs for Winter, and Winter Retreat

  • Packed with practical advice, hints, and tips on what can be achieved amidst these severe conditions, and what work can also be undertaken indoors
  • Lists several variety of bulbs, flowers, fruits, and vegetables that can be grown, maintained, and harvested during the winter
  • Step-by-step projects with stylized photography to emphasize how your garden "could" look
  • Practical advice on planting, propagating, pruning, and plant protection

    About The Author
    Steven Bradley is a much-respected author of this genre, having already written practical gardening guides for spring, summer, and autumn.

  • Product Details

    ISBN-13:
    9780737006285
    Publisher:
    Time-Life Custom Publishing
    Publication date:
    10/28/2000
    Pages:
    200
    Product dimensions:
    9.25(w) x 11.72(h) x 0.76(d)

    Related Subjects

    Read an Excerpt

    Chapter 1- A Time of Transition

    In the United States, autumn is referred to as the fall, describing the process of leaves being shed by deciduous climbers, trees and shrubs. Before the leaves are actually discarded, they undergo a number of colour changes. In the north United States, this colour change travels south at a rate of about 60-70km (35-45 miles) a day, and is so pronounced that it can be detected from space. The progress of seasonal change is mirrored in Northern Europe as well, with severe conditions and rapidly dropping light levels being most prevalent the further one travels north. In some plants, the colour changes of the autumn leaves are slow and subtle, whilst in others, the changes are much more pronounced and vivid to the extent that, for some species, this can be the most colourful and attractive season of the year. Most leaves are shaded green through the spring and summer, but the chlorophyll masks the many different types and quantities of pigment that are responsible for the colorus of these leaves as they die.

    As autumn progresses, a major recycling process begins as the plants take useful nutrients from the leaves back into the stem and branches. These are stored over winter for use during the major surge of growth in springtime. Chlorophyll is the first pigment to be withdrawn from the leaf, which means that other pigments are visible, such as red and orange carotene, yellow xanthophylls, and/or reddish purple anthocyanin pigments, which are the result of sugars building up in the leaves, rather than being transported into the woody tissues of the stems and branches.

    The richness and variety of the colour display will vary according to the weather conditions being experienced during the period when the leaves are slowly dying. The ideal weather conditions for a good show of leaf colour are a cool, damp autumn, with very little wind or frost, as these conditions give sow colour change, with the leaves hanging on the plants for the longest possible time.

    Once the plant has drawn as much from the leaf as it possibly can, the connecting veins linking the leaf to the stem are closed sealed by the plant. A layer forms across the cells, effectively isolating the leaf, and acting as protection against weather and harmful organisms entering the plant through these veins. The leaves will then fall from the plant within a few days of this abscission layer forming. This process, whereby plants "toughen up" in order to withstand low water temperatures, is know as acclimation, but it is worth bearing in mind that this will not make frost-tender plants hardy.

    Factors such as temperature variations, or changes in the availability of water, vary greatly from year to year. They are less consistent than changes in day length over a one-year cycle, so for any plant a change in day length is a more reliable warning of the approach of seasonal change to come

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