Wired TV: Laboring Over an Interactive Future

Overview

This collection looks at the post–network television industry’s heady experiments with new forms of interactive storytelling—or wired TV—that took place from 2005 to 2010 as the networks responded to the introduction of broadband into the majority of homes and the proliferation of popular, participatory Web 2.0 companies like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

Contributors address a wide range of issues, from the networks’ sporadic efforts to engage fans using transmedia ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $23.91   
  • New (5) from $25.11   
  • Used (3) from $23.91   
Wired TV: Laboring Over an Interactive Future

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$16.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$29.95 List Price

Overview

This collection looks at the post–network television industry’s heady experiments with new forms of interactive storytelling—or wired TV—that took place from 2005 to 2010 as the networks responded to the introduction of broadband into the majority of homes and the proliferation of popular, participatory Web 2.0 companies like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

Contributors address a wide range of issues, from the networks’ sporadic efforts to engage fans using transmedia storytelling to the production inefficiencies that continue to dog network television to the impact of multimedia convergence and multinational, corporate conglomeration on entrepreneurial creativity. With essays from such top scholars as Henry Jenkins, John T. Caldwell, and Jonathan Gray and from new and exciting voices emerging in this field, Wired TV elucidates the myriad new digital threats and the equal number of digital opportunities that have become part and parcel of today’s post-network era. Readers will quickly recognize the familiar television franchises on which the contributors focus— including Lost, The Office, Entourage, Battlestar Gallactica, The L Word, and Heroes—in order to reveal their impact on an industry in transition.

While it is not easy for vast bureaucracies to change course, executives from key network divisions engaged in an unprecedented period of innovation and collaboration with four important groups: members of the Hollywood creative community who wanted to expand television’s storytelling worlds and marketing capabilities by incorporating social media; members of the Silicon Valley tech community who were keen to rethink television distribution for the digital era; members of the Madison Avenue advertising community who were eager to rethink ad-supported content; and fans who were enthusiastic and willing to use social media story extensions to proselytize on behalf of a favorite network series.

In the aftermath of the lengthy Writers Guild of America strike of 2007/2008, the networks clamped down on such collaborations and began to reclaim control over their operations, locking themselves back into an aging system of interconnected bureaucracies, entrenched hierarchies, and traditional partners from the past. What’s next for the future of the television industry? Stay tuned—or at least online.

Contributors: Vincent Brook, Will Brooker, John T. Caldwell, M. J. Clarke, Jonathan Gray, Henry Jenkins, Derek Johnson, Robert V. Kozinets, Denise Mann, Katynka Z. Martínez, and Julie Levin Russo

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

author of Empires of Entertainment - Jennifer Holt

"Wired TV offers rich, creative, and original thinking about television’s digital era. It is essential reading for anyone following contemporary media industries."
San Francisco State University - Daniel Bernardi

"With contributions from prominent scholars, Wired TV offers rigorous and exacting essays that address the dramatic shift occurring in a business that produces, sells, and resells mass entertainment."

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813564531
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press
  • Publication date: 2/11/2014
  • Pages: 306
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Meet the Author

DENISE MANN is an associate professor and head of the UCLA Producer’s Program, University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author or editor of numerous books and articles on the film and television industries, including Hollywood Independents: The Postwar Takeover and Private Screenings: Television and the Female Consumer.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Acknolwedgments

Introduction: When Television and New Media Work Worlds Collide
Denise Mann

1. Authorship Up for Grabs: Decentralized Labor, Licensing, and the Management of Collaborative Creativity
Derek Johnson

2. In the Game: The Creative and Textual Constraints of Licensed Video Games
Jonathan Gray

3. Going Pro: Gendered Responses to the Incorporation of Fan Labor as User-Generated Content
Will Brooker

4. Labor of Love: Charting The L Word
Julie Levin Russo 

5. The Labor Behind the Lost ARG: WGA's Tentative Foothold in the Digital Age
Denise Mann

6. Post-Network Reflexivity: Viral Marketing and Labor Management
John T. Caldwell

7. Fan Creep: Why Brands Suddenly Need "Fans"
Robert V. Kozinets

8. Outsourcing The Office
M. J. Clarke

9. Convergent Ethnicity and the Neo-Platoon Show: Recombining Difference in the Post-Network Era
Vincent Brook

10. Translating Telenovelas in a Neo-Network Era: Finding an Online Home for MyNetwork Soaps
Katynka Z. Martínez

11. The Reign of the "Mothership": Transmedia's Past, Present, and Possible Futures
Henry Jenkins

Notes on Contributors
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)