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The Wise Man's Fear (Kingkiller Chronicles Series #2)

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"There are three things all wise men fear: the sea in storm, a night with no moon, and the anger of a gentle man."

My name is Kvothe.

I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others ...

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The Wise Man's Fear (Kingkiller Chronicles Series #2)

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Overview

  • Watch a video
"There are three things all wise men fear: the sea in storm, a night with no moon, and the anger of a gentle man."

My name is Kvothe.

I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep.

You may have heard of me.

So begins the tale of a hero told from his own point of view-a story unequaled in fantasy literature. Now in The Wise Man's Fear, Day Two of The Kingkiller Chronicle, an escalating rivalry with a powerful member of the nobility forces Kvothe to leave the University and seek his fortune abroad. Adrift, penniless, and alone, he travels to Vintas, where he quickly becomes entangled in the politics of courtly society. While attempting to curry favor with a powerful noble, Kvothe uncovers an assassination attempt, comes into conflict with a rival arcanist, and leads a group of mercenaries into the wild, in an attempt to solve the mystery of who (or what) is waylaying travelers on the King's road.

All the while, Kvothe searches for answers, attempting to uncover the truth about the mysterious Amyr, the Chandrian, and the death of his parents. Along the way, Kvothe is put on trial by the legendary Adem mercenaries, is forced to reclaim the honor of the Edema Ruh, and travels into the Fae realm. There he meets Felurian, the faerie woman no man can resist, and who no man has ever survived...until Kvothe.

In The Wise Man's Fear, Kvothe takes his first steps on the path of the hero and learns how difficult life can be when a man becomes a legend in his own time.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

For nearly four years, science fiction enthusiasts have been eagerly awaiting this second volume to Patrick Rothfuss' Kingkiller Chronicles. The first volume, The Name of the Wind, won the prestigious Quill Award and Terry Brooks praised it as "deep and intricate and wondrous." In this lynchpin book of the trilogy, Kyothe continues his perilous search for answers about the death of his parents even as he grapples with more pressing dangers. Bound to be a bestseller. (P.S. The Name of the Wind is available in both mass market paperback and NOOKbook.)

Publishers Weekly
As seamless and lyrical as a song from the lute-playing adventurer and arcanist Kvothe, this mesmerizing sequel to Rothfuss's 2007's debut, The Name of the Wind, is a towering work of fantasy. As Kvothe, now the unassuming keeper of the Waystone Inn, continues to share his astounding life story—a history that includes saving an influential lord from treachery, defeating a band of dangerous bandits, and surviving an encounter with a legendary Fae seductress—he also offers glimpses into his life's true pursuit: figuring out how to vanquish the mythical Chandrian, a group of seven godlike destroyers that brutally murdered his family and left him an orphan. But while Kvothe recalls the events of his past, his future is conspiring just outside the inn's doors. This breathtakingly epic story is heartrending in its intimacy and masterful in its narrative essence, and will leave fans waiting on tenterhooks for the final installment. (Mar.)
Brandon Sanderson

"The Wise Man's Fear is a beautiful book to read. Masterful prose, a sense of cohesion to the storytelling, a wonderful sense of pacing.... There is a beauty to Pat's writing that defies description."
George R. R. Martin

"The best epic fantasy I read last year.... He's bloody good, this Rothfuss guy."
Library Journal
The bartender Kvothe continues telling his story to the Chronicler, relating his years as a student of magic at the University, the scandal that forced him to seek his fortune abroad, life in a strictly hierarchical society, a dalliance with a woman of the Fae, and his ongoing search for the mysterious Chandrian, who were responsible for his family's death. In this sequel to The Name of the Wind, mysteries deepen and the characters grow even more fascinating. VERDICT Reminiscent in scope of Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" series and similar in feel to the narrative tour de force of The Arabian Nights, this masterpiece of storytelling will appeal to lovers of fantasy on a grand scale.
Kirkus Reviews

A walloping sword-and-sorcery fest from Rothfuss, the second volume in a projected trilogy (The Name of the Wind,2007).

Readers of that debut—and if you weren't a reader of the first volume, then none of the second will make any sense to you—will remember that its protagonist, Kvothe (rhymes with "quoth"), was an orphan with magical powers and, as the years rolled by, the ability to pull music out of the air and write "songs that make the minstrels weep."The second volume finds him busily acquiring all kinds of knowledge to help his wizardly career along, for which reason he is in residence in a cool college burg, "barely more than a town, really,"that has other towns beat by a league in the arcane-knowledge department, to say nothing of cafés where you can talk elevated talk and drink "Veltish coffee and Vintish wine,"as good post-hobbits must. For one thing, the place has a direct line to a vast underground archive where pretty much everything that has ever been thought or imagined is catalogued; for another thing, anyone who is anyone in the world of eldritch studies comes by, which puts Kvothe in close proximity to the impossibly beautiful fairy Felurian, who makes hearts go flippity-flop and knows some pretty good tricks in the way of evading evil. Evil there is, and in abundance, but who cares if you're dating such a cool creature? Rothfuss works all the well-worn conventions of the genre, with a shadow cloak here and a stinging sword there and lots of wizardry throughout, blending a thoroughly prosaic prose style with the heft-of-tome ambitions of a William T. Vollmann. This is a great big book indeed, but not much happens—which, to judge by the success of its predecessor, will faze readers not a whit.

For latter-day D&D fans, a long-awaited moment. For the rest—well, maybe J.K. Rowling will write another book after all.

Locus
The Wise Man’s Fear fairly leaps off the page, whatever the setting and circumstances”
The Onion A. V. Club
“This sequel carries the first book’s ideas and wild exuberance further, with aplomb. By combining bold choices with bolder sincerity, Rothfuss has found one of the secrets of great storytelling. He doesn’t reinvent the wheel, but he knows damn sure how to ride it.”
Jo Walton
The Wise Man's Fear was worth waiting for. It’s about as good as this kind of fantasy can possibly get.... This is an extremely immersive story set in a flawlessly constructed world and told extremely well. I don’t want to criticize it and analyse it—I don’t want to step that far away from it. I want to sink down below the surface of it and become completely immersed.”
George R.R. Martin
"The best epic fantasy I read last year... I gulped it down in a day, staying up almost to dawn reading, and I am already itching for the next one. He's bloody good, this Rothfuss guy."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780756404734
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/1/2011
  • Series: Kingkiller Chronicles Series , #2
  • Pages: 1008
  • Sales rank: 26,281
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 2.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Patrick Rothfuss
Patrick Rothfuss was born in Wisconsin where long winters and lack of cable television brought about a love of reading and writing. His mother read to him as a child, and his father taught him to build things. If you are looking for the roots of his storytelling, look there. He still lives in central Wisconsin, still lacks cable television, teaches at the college he grew to love as a student and the long winters force him to stay inside and write.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 1582 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1260)

4 Star

(215)

3 Star

(66)

2 Star

(24)

1 Star

(17)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 1600 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 8, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Well worth the wait. Rothfuss has penned a masterpiece.

    Patrick Rothfuss has written another exceptional book. It was worth the wait given how brilliant of a book it truly is. Rothfuss really is a great story teller. For a book of nearly 1000 pages it would be easy to assume he weighed it down with excessive words and passages. That, however, wasn't the case at all. Every word, sentence and paragraph lent itself to the overall story. Nothing excessive and nothing wasted. He never bogged the story down with useless information making it so easy to get lost in the story. In this book he continues to develop the story and characters as fully as possible. I felt, while reading and now after completion, that he did a remarkable job establishing and maintaining the relationships between Kvothe and his friends, allies and enemies. His relationship with Denna and Elodin are particularly fascinating. Devi too. Ah, heck, his relationship with everyone is explained and explored brilliantly by Rothfuss. Rothfuss also introduces more characters for us to get to know. One of the things that makes this book and series so unique is that Rothfuss seems to know where he wants to take this story and is following his vision right to the end. He is giving us both the good and bad parts of his characters. Kvothe isn't perfect and neither is anyone else and he explores every side of his characters. We see their virtues and flaws. He just does a remarkable job in his writing style and story telling. I guess, for me, all I can say to sum this up is that I loved this book. I will gladly wait as long as needed if that's what it takes for Rothfuss to deliver another amazing book. I can't wait to see where Kvothe goes next.

    32 out of 33 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 10, 2011

    Somewhat of a letdown from the first book

    I, like many others, had waited a long time for the 2nd installment of the Kingkiller Chronicles. The first book, "The Name of the Wind" was one of the best debut novels of fantasy I had ever read. Perhaps the the bar was raised to high by the the first book, because I definitely feel the sophomore jinx has taken it's toll on "The Wise Man's Fear".

    The first book established itself with all the usual elements of epic fantasy. A young orphan boy with great promise, comes of age and starts on the path of becoming a great Wizard. What was unique was the perspective the author chose to employ. The tale being told through a series of flashbacks from the main character who is older and semi-retired from Wizarding and is now operating an inn some far off corner of the world. The second book picks up right where the first let off with Kvothe retelling of his continued adventures in magic and music at the University.

    Here is where my first minor complaint begins. There's nothing wrong with an author borrowing ideas from other authors especially successful ones. However, the first 3rd of The Wise Man's fear reads very much like one of the Harry Potter books. There's an analog for every major character from Snape to Draco to Luna Lovegood.

    After about 350 pages of Kvothe learning more magic and outwitting his adversaries at the University, Rothfuss abruptly changes the setting and has Kvothe set out on the road. At this point, Rothfuss does another thing that frustrates me. Instead of just saying Kvothe arrives in the far away land, he lets us know that he barely makes it with nothing but his Lute and his wits intact. Why let us know about road adventures, but then skip the details.

    Regardless, the change in scenery is welcome, and we get to know more about the other realms of the world Kvothe lives in. What follows is a "Cyrano de Bergerac" type tale where our young hero must use his various skills in the employ of a powerful Duke. His first task is to "court" a young nobel lady who the Duke wishes to marry. Along the way he prevents an assassination attempt upon said Duke (whose motive is never explained) and as a reward gets sent out to fight bandits in the Woods who are stealing the Duke's tax money.

    From there, its one adventure after the next. In summary he manages to defeat the bandits with his magic, enters manhood with the help of a legendary fairy creature, has a chance encounters a evil oracle type create which apparently will shape his future fate, and finally learns to fight with hand and sword from the mysterious Adem mercenaries. On his way back to the Duke, he solves another minor mystery and as a reward is banished from the Duke's service after offending his new wife with the revelation of his heritage.

    The story ends with Kvothe back at his University with fatter pockets and a new reputation as a ladies man. We end up with a better picture of how the Kvothe legend formed, but still no significant progress on the main mystery of the series which would be who Chandrian and Amyr are and where they can be found.

    To sum up, its an entertaining read, but the sense of wonder I had in the first book is squashed by the rambling nature of the 2nd book. Rothfuss has a lot of work to do to finish this up in a 3rd book.

    19 out of 42 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 25, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    High anxiety for number three

    The Wise Man's Fear is amazing. He is clever, passionate and has a great sense of humor. I enjoyed reading the original characters' development and meeting new ones. It is a great book of three parts. I found myself pausing and re-reading passages or phrases. Patrick Rothfuss's writing is a pleasure to read. His comedy is as perfectly done as his emotional heart-breaking tragedy. The great plotting and timing and somehow turning the improbable into possible kept me fascinated throughout. This is sheer fun and entertainment that will keep your anxiety at a peek until number three is out.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2012

    The first half was wonderfully written and I couldn't put it dow

    The first half was wonderfully written and I couldn't put it down! The second half was pretty bad, it's like he ran out of plot and made it into a nerdy male wet dream to keep people reading to the end. I'll probably read the last book (whenever it's released) since I really liked the first book and the first half of this one. Overall the first half is great but be prepared to roll your eyes at the super smart sex master ninja that suddenly everyone wants to bang in the second half.

    8 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    fans will relish more of Kyothe's adventures of how an orphan has become the most infamous wizard the world has ever known

    Kvothe of the Waystone Inn continues to tell his life history as he sought information and risked his life many times over to learn information about the mythical Chandrian seven; demi deities who brutally murdered his parents leaving him an orphaned child. Kyothe explains he entered the University, but was expelled when he alienated a noble. From school he traveled to Vintas where he got into local politics when he learned of a planned assassination attempt. Adem mercenaries put him on trial and he ended the terror of the King's Road. His escapades led to the lure of Felurian the fae in her realm in which he is the first mortal to escape her seduction while staying sane. Whether he burned down Trebon or chatted with Gods, Kyothe remained resolute that his life's work is to kill the Chadrian.

    Kvothe has seen much more than any person has ever seen; been to places few believe exists; and conversed with Gods some no longer worshipped and feared. He knows he has become part of the mythos; but, no man can live up to the whispers of the legend they have become, not even Kyothe the wanderer.

    The second Kingkiller Chronicle (see The Name of the Wind) is a great epic fantasy starring an intriguing lead character. Kyothe has dedicated his life to one goal, but to achieve his obsession he ends up doing a myriad of seemingly sidebar escapades; but these like his time with the Adem and his one night with Felurian enhance his skills as he prepares for the confrontation that he seeks. Although there is repetitive emotional angst (to be expected in a tome just under a thousand pages), fans will relish more of Kyothe's adventures of how an orphan has become the most infamous wizard the world has ever known.

    Harriet Klausner

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 15, 2011

    It was ok

    Well, the first book was amazing. I have been waiting a long time. The problem is that the author did not seem intelligent enough to keep up with the brilliance of Kvothe. Kvothe continually failed to comprehend everything, from book knowledge to street knowledge. However, he and everyone else kept talking about how intelligent he was. The characters would make comments and Kvothe would be confused. It was clear that the author wanted the comments to come across as cryptic and deep, when they were really shallow, easily understood, and made Kvothe seem an idiot. For a while I thought it might be a play on the humility of Kvothe, as he was telling the story, but that was soon revealed to be false. To top it off, he became petty-making spiteful little gestures such as brushing past people and hoping they noticed how curt he was...what on earth, that was not in keeping with the intelligence, pride, and street wise power of the Edema Ruh established in the first book. In the end, it was an ok read, but not anything special in my mind, and certainly not anything as beautiful, enthralling, or powerful as the first novel.

    6 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 3, 2011

    Worth every penny

    This wasn't the review I wanted to write, but rather a response to the whining review that came up when I went to 'review' wherin the Ebook price was the issue. I read a LOT and this series may just be the most enjoyable one EVER. I read fast and I spent 18 hours yesterday and just under 19 hours today with a literal all nighter finishing now at 4:42 AM. how can that not be worth $15 ? 41 CENTS per hour is cheap entertainment these days. Hey if you gotta save WAIT. DON'T whine. There's this amazing thing called a library and another called a second hand bookstore....Or there's a lend function for ebooks. I for one want the author and the publisher to get theirs for bringing it so that they will have the incentive to KEEP up the good work.

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2011

    Great Book!!

    This story is absolutely wonderful. One of the best,if not the best, book I have read in many years. The author is deeply talented, and has a beautiful turn of phrase. Well worth the money and highly recommended.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 6, 2011

    Even better than the first!

    If you haven't read book one, do yourself a favor and read it. Then immediatly run out and buy this one.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 30, 2011

    Get ready...

    Once you start this series you'll need to prepare yourself to miss sleep, ignore the phone, and skip your various duties until the story is done. I tell you three times... get ready!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 28, 2010

    One of the best!

    I have been reading Fantasy novels for 35 years. All the big names and a lot of the smaller. This is the first time I have ever pre-ordered a book, much less bought it for retail price!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 1, 2011

    Amazing

    This is the first fantasy book I've ever picked up and if they're all like this, I've been missing something fantastic for 18 longs years. The only reason I ever put it down was because I was too exhausted to keep my eyes open at 5 in the morning.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2011

    I WANT MORE!

    The plot's continued complexity and weaving kept me interested the entire time. There were a couple slow moments, but they laid the foundation for the higher intensity moments. Great book! The only downside is that I wanted to read the next book ASAP but it's not out yet!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 19, 2011

    Amazing

    This book is amazing!! It flows seamlessly from the first book and once you start reading you cant put it down! Now Patrick needs to come out with the third one and make it like 4,000 pages long!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 26, 2011

    Fantastic! I could not put it down!

    My son and I waited three years for this book and it was worth the wait! He read it in three days and I in four. (There is something to be said about a book with equal appeal for a 14 year old boy and a 48 year mom!) Book 2 is an absorbing and exciting tale with unexpected twists at every turn. I do not read a lot of fantasy novels per se so perhaps I am less jaded than some of the other reviewers about the familiar ring of certain motifs. But even if certain plots lines are familiar, so what? The narrative never got boring. NEVER! How many 900-pages-plus books can you say that about? I actually enjoyed this book even more than the first. I thought, in particular, that the female characters had more substance than in the first book--especially when it came to the women warriors and their place in their society. That part of the narrative was a perfect transition from Kvothe's experiences in the realm of the fae which may make some women roll their eyes a bit. (I didn't by the way. Even that chapter--though slightly predictable-- was lovely.) After finishing the book last night, I felt sad as though I was saying good-bye to good friends. Rothfuss is a master at creating believable characters in palpable settings. Now that I have finished book 2 I am certain there will be a book 3. There has to be. I need to know what happens to Kvothe!
    P.S. This is a review of the hardcover book. I was unable to edit my earlier review.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2011

    big time keepers

    I have to agree with all the other people's high rants about this book so I'll not repeat them. I will add that in addition to characters and a hero that you can't help but love and the already mentioned dash of Harry Potter, you get a little David Copperfield. I read David C. when I was quite young and it left an impression on me. The struggles of a downtrodden child and their climb out of the gutter and onto to becoming a very well-rounded bad-ass captivates me. Patrick reminded me of how wonderful stories can be.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 4, 2011

    Wow, Amazing.

    This is a great read, worth the wait. I downloaded and midnight on the first and spent the next 16 hrs., completely engrossed in the story. I had absolutely no problems with availability. B&N did very well with this, the cost is not an issue if you want a book you buy a book if its new either hard copy or digital you are paying for the authors effort not the paper. That being said i would have willingly paid double for this book. My only complaint is now i have to wait for the third installment. Oh well i get to read them both again anyway.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 11, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Patrick Rothfuss The Wise Man's Fear (Kingkiller Chronicle)

    In my opinion, this is undeniably the most anticipated book this year and I can't wait to be amoung the first to read it.

    3 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 21, 2012

    Hurry Up, Pat!

    As the second act of Kvothe's saga, Wise Man's Fear does not disappoint. In fact, if you were engaged by Name of the Wind, skipping Rothfuss' next installment of his Kingkiller Chronicles is unthinkable. My only complaint is that the book is so damn good, I tore through it in just a couple days. So, c'mon, Mr. Rothfuss.... please finish Doors of Stone (#3) before we devoted fans die of thirst out here!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    Epicness

    A flat out f*@#ing great book. Buy it or perish!!!!!!!!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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