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The Wise Woman

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Overview

#1 New York Times bestselling author Philippa Gregory weaves an unforgettable tale of a young woman’s sorcery and desire in Henry VIII’s England, where magic, lust, and power are forever intertwined.

Growing up as an abandoned outcast on the moors, young Alys’ only company is her cruel foster mother, Morach, the local wise woman who is whispered to practice the dark arts. Alys joins a nunnery to escape the poverty and loneliness she has felt all her life, but all too soon her ...

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New York, NY 1992 Hard cover First edition. New in new dust jacket. Sewn binding. Paper over boards. Audience: General/trade. the book and the jacket are in brand new unused ... condition Read more Show Less

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The Wise Woman: A Novel

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Overview

#1 New York Times bestselling author Philippa Gregory weaves an unforgettable tale of a young woman’s sorcery and desire in Henry VIII’s England, where magic, lust, and power are forever intertwined.

Growing up as an abandoned outcast on the moors, young Alys’ only company is her cruel foster mother, Morach, the local wise woman who is whispered to practice the dark arts. Alys joins a nunnery to escape the poverty and loneliness she has felt all her life, but all too soon her sanctuary is destroyed. King Henry VIII’s followers burn the holy place to the ground, and Alys only just manages to escape with her life, haunted by the screams of her sisters as they burned to death.

She finds work in a castle not far from where she grew up as an old lord’s scribe, where she falls obsessively in love with his son Hugo. But Hugo is already married to a proud woman named Catherine. Driven to desperation by her desire, she summons the most dangerous powers Morach taught her, but quickly the passionate triangle of Alys, Hugo, and Catherine begins to explode, launching them into uncharted sexual waters. The magic Alys has conjured now has a life of its own—a life that is horrifyingly and disastrously out of control.

Is she a witch? Since heresy means the stake, and witchcraft the rope, Alys is in mortal danger, treading a perilous path between her faith and her own power.

The bestselling author of Wideacre, Meridon, and The Favored Child masterfully blends history, romance, and the occult in a spellbinding new novel. In 16th-century England, young Alys despises the knowledge of dark magic an old wise woman forced upon her, and she is doomed to desire a man who could very well destroy her.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The author of the Wideacre trilogy presents a historical romance about a 16th-century English witch. (Dec.)
Library Journal
This new novel by the author of Wideacre (S. & S., 1987) and other popular historical fiction profiles a woman versed in charms, conjuring, and fortune-telling who nonetheless falls into catastrophic misfortunes time after time. Escaping from an English convent, young Alys learns the arts of healing and magic from the ``wise woman'' who takes her in. Her struggle to find an independent life takes her among an array of characters, including a mediocre lover, a sickly old man still very much in control of the lives around him, and two challenging women: Marach and Mother Hildebrande. Gregory weaves a vivid tapestry of life in the 16th century, including plenty of sex, as the narrative strains toward a not-unexpected end.-- M.E. Chitty, Fairchild International Lib . Inst . , Plainfield, N.J.
From Barnes & Noble
A young woman, torn between her convent-bred sense of holiness and her growing powers of healing & magic, seeks to control her destiny in a Reformation world where it is treason to be a papist and fatal to be suspected of witchcraft.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780671792749
  • Publisher: Atria Books
  • Publication date: 11/1/1993
  • Pages: 448

Meet the Author

Philippa Gregory is the author of several bestselling novels, including The Other Boleyn Girl, and is a recognized authority on women’s history. Her Cousins’ War novels are the basis for the critically acclaimed Starz miniseries The White Queen. She studied history at the University of Sussex and received a PhD from the University of Edinburgh. She welcomes visitors to her website, PhilippaGregory.com.

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    1. Hometown:
      Yorkshire, England
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 9, 1954
    2. Place of Birth:
      Nairobi, Kenya, East Africa
    1. Education:
      B.A. in history, Sussex University, 1982; Ph.D., 18th-century popular fiction, Edinburgh, 1984
    2. Website:

Introduction

The Wise Woman

1. Philippa Gregory has created some wicked characters in this book. Who did you see as the ultimate villain? At what times did Alys have your sympathies? Did she ever go so far in her selfishness that she lost your compassion? What about Catherine? Did you ever begin to feel bad for her despite her ill treatment of some of the other women? Did the old lord Hugh or Hugo ever gain your sympathy?

2. Alys tries to find ways to regain safety and stability after the abbey is burned. She tells Morach, "I have no safety without some power." In what ways does she try to gain power once she gets to the castle? Do you think Alys handled her power wisely?

3. Morach tells Alys, "You're a woman of no loyalty, Alys. It's whatever will serve a purpose for you." To what degree do you find this true? Do any of the characters in The Wise Woman show loyalty? At what times does Alys's disloyalty save her? What does she lose by continually acting selfishly?

4. The book takes place during the English Reformation. How do Alys's affiliations with black magic and Catholicism mimic each other? Why do you think both witches and heretics were put to death? What dangers did they present to the Church of England?

5. The book also takes place during the reign of King Henry VIII. "[Hugo] and his father had craved sons, but this reign had taught men the value of pretty women as pawns in the power game." Discuss some of the gender role differences in Lord Hugh's castle. How did women gain power? How did the historical events that took place during King Henry VIII's reign affect the fictional story of Alys and Catherine?

6. Alys initially becomes a nun becausethe abbey provides a relatively luxurious and comfortable life. She measures her success in Lord Hugh's castle by how many gowns she has compared to Catherine. Why do you think Alys is so concerned with material possessions? How did her preoccupation with wealth and material gain inform her decisions throughout the story?

7. Discuss Alys's relationship with Tom. Do you think she truly loved him? Did you expect that he would return again and become the one person Alys could love unconditionally?

8. Alys considers Hildebrande a "woman mad for martyrdom, rushing toward exposure and danger." Did you see Hildebrande's loyalty to her religion as foolish? Or was Alys's extreme disloyalty more surprising? Are some beliefs worth dying for?

9. Given what you read in the novel, do you think that Alys had magical powers? Can the wax be explained scientifically? What about the carved bones? What do you think became of the wax figures once Alys died?

10. Do you think that Alys finally made the right decision at the end of the book? If she was in fact pregnant, do you think it was sinful of her to cast her unborn child onto the fire with her? What is the significance of beginning and ending the novel from Alys's point of view, and with the same words?

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Reading Group Guide

The Wise Woman

1. Philippa Gregory has created some wicked characters in this book. Who did you see as the ultimate villain? At what times did Alys have your sympathies? Did she ever go so far in her selfishness that she lost your compassion? What about Catherine? Did you ever begin to feel bad for her despite her ill treatment of some of the other women? Did the old lord Hugh or Hugo ever gain your sympathy?

2. Alys tries to find ways to regain safety and stability after the abbey is burned. She tells Morach, "I have no safety without some power." In what ways does she try to gain power once she gets to the castle? Do you think Alys handled her power wisely?

3. Morach tells Alys, "You're a woman of no loyalty, Alys. It's whatever will serve a purpose for you." To what degree do you find this true? Do any of the characters in The Wise Woman show loyalty? At what times does Alys's disloyalty save her? What does she lose by continually acting selfishly?

4. The book takes place during the English Reformation. How do Alys's affiliations with black magic and Catholicism mimic each other? Why do you think both witches and heretics were put to death? What dangers did they present to the Church of England?

5. The book also takes place during the reign of King Henry VIII. "[Hugo] and his father had craved sons, but this reign had taught men the value of pretty women as pawns in the power game." Discuss some of the gender role differences in Lord Hugh's castle. How did women gain power? How did the historical events that took place during King Henry VIII's reign affect the fictional story of Alys and Catherine?

6. Alys initially becomes a nun because the abbey provides a relatively luxurious and comfortable life. She measures her success in Lord Hugh's castle by how many gowns she has compared to Catherine. Why do you think Alys is so concerned with material possessions? How did her preoccupation with wealth and material gain inform her decisions throughout the story?

7. Discuss Alys's relationship with Tom. Do you think she truly loved him? Did you expect that he would return again and become the one person Alys could love unconditionally?

8. Alys considers Hildebrande a "woman mad for martyrdom, rushing toward exposure and danger." Did you see Hildebrande's loyalty to her religion as foolish? Or was Alys's extreme disloyalty more surprising? Are some beliefs worth dying for?

9. Given what you read in the novel, do you think that Alys had magical powers? Can the wax be explained scientifically? What about the carved bones? What do you think became of the wax figures once Alys died?

10. Do you think that Alys finally made the right decision at the end of the book? If she was in fact pregnant, do you think it was sinful of her to cast her unborn child onto the fire with her? What is the significance of beginning and ending the novel from Alys's point of view, and with the same words?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 80 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(21)

4 Star

(21)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(10)

1 Star

(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 81 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 10, 2009

    dissapointment

    I'd first like to say that I'm huge fan of Ms. Gregory. However, I was completely dissapointed with this book. The story line is very good and I think it had alot of potenital. It's very hard to like a main character when she's such a horrible person. It was difficult for me to get into the story and root for something good to happen when Alys the main heroine is so unlikeable. Don't waste your money on this book. If this is the first book of Philippa Gregory choose another, The Other Boylen Girl, The Queens Fool, or The Constant Princess are very good try those first!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2008

    A mess of a novel

    I¿ve read all of Phillipa Gregory¿s Tudor era historical novels, so I was delighted to find one that I hadn¿t seen before. Unfortunately, this turned out to be a book that had gone out of print for good reason. This novel tries to be too many things, and fails at being good at any one of them. The novel starts out as the tale of Alys, a young woman who joins a nunnery a few years before Henry VIII dissolves the monasteries in England. I originally thought that it was going to be the story of the struggle between the Church of Rome and the Church of England. But the story soon turns away from religion, and flounders into romance territory when Alys becomes the clerk for old Lord Hugh and falls under the wandering eye of young Lord Hugh and finds herself smitten. Then the plot suddenly takes a detour into the occult as Alys attempts to access her ¿female power¿ and cast spells. The novel flounders around, changing direction almost every chapter. Alys bounces around like a pinball, first she longs for her life as a nun, the next she is enjoying her sinful life too much to give it up. One minute she is hot to trot for young Lord Hugh, the next her passion has gone cold. One minute you think she has turned into a witch, the next she¿s back to wanting to be a nun again. And through it all the reader is subjected to a host of entirely unpleasant characters, the worst of which is the main character, Alys. I don¿t think that Gregory intended for her to be quite so unsympathetic, but it is hard to like such a selfish character. I would recommend Gregory¿s other Tudor era novels, but this one should be avoided.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 26, 2010

    It wore me out trying to keep the ends tied together.

    Philippa Gregory is an awesome writer and "The Red Queen" and "The Other Boleyn Girl" for example are books I could not put down. I was disappointed in "The Wise Woman" in that as I read along my dislike for the main character increased so much the book started to bore me. The content became more "out there" as the story went along and several pieces of the story "puzzle" seemed to get lost by the time the book was done leaving the reader to wonder what happened to those things. Too many loose ends and too hard to believe for my taste, but that won't stop me from reading other books from P. Gregory.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 9, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Quite possibly worst than Beatrice of Wildacre

    I love Philippa Gregory so I read this novel, thinking it would be good. I was so wrong, so very wrong. It's not enought that Alys is truly a bad person, the plot is extradorinarily contrived. It follows so many tangents that I felt like I needed a map to get through. First it was this, then that, then something entirely different, before meandering to an entirely other thing. There were so many loose ends by the end of the book. And the ending is not only disturbing but absolutley pointless.

    I honestly can't think of anyone to which this book would appeal. The only redeeming quailty of this book is that it was written early in Gregory's career, nearly a decade before The Other Boleyn Girl. My advice: only read books she wrote this century.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 8, 2010

    Hands down-amazing!

    I have to say Ms. Gregory chose to tackle a very delicate subject..most which people tend to shy away from and do not even wish to discuss but the truth of the matter is that this subject was a very real aspect in those times and many people were killed and tortured for being thought of as "witches"--innocent people at that. In this book you tend to feel different emotions for the main character-which is great. You love her, then hate her, are appalled at her behavior, you pity her, then you are touched by her. I did not expect the ending that Ms. Gregory had for this book. I was so touched and saddened the book brought me to tears. Bravo Ms. Gregory another great peice!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2009

    Not the best from the Author.

    I'm a huge fan of Philippa Gregory, but this is my least favorite book of hers. It starts out really slow, I almost returned it after the first or second chapter, but it did pick up enough to want to finish the rest of the book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2013

    Can't recommend

    This book was depressing and the characters were not very endearing. Not the usual fair from Ms. Gregory. I love reading her wonderfully detailed books but this one left me cold!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 16, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This was the first novel I read of hers. I've been an avid fan

    This was the first novel I read of hers. I've been an avid fan since.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 12, 2010

    Didn't see that coming!

    I'm not a big fan of books with "raunchy" material. But I found I could not put this book down! It completely took me by suprise and left me with chills.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2008

    An Absolute Must Read!

    This book was captivating and I read it in a matter of days, sexy, historical, and witty with a bit of naughty. Philippa Gregory is one of my favorite authors. I cant wait to read all her books!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2014

    The Wise Woman

    By Philippa Gregory. Not her best, but by no means her worst. Definitly for the younger set, but has some steamy sex in it for some of us older women. Haha! It is at is best historically speaking, and has it all. You will hate most of the charactrs. As is the norm and the main reason I love Gregory! Charm us with these wicked ones , Ms. Gregory and I shall set down with a pint or two. I loved the candle wax blobs , Hilarious! Kept me in fits ! I had just about read it all at that point. Lol, you write em, I buy em! Charm me more, please.

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  • Posted August 23, 2013

    Recommend if open minded

    Too graphically sexual in parts to be enjoyed as work of Philippa Gregory, and the ending was guessed waaaay ahead of time. I prefer her usual, history mixed with fantasy style, with just enough sex to make it hum, but not so much that it offends the imagination. Seems it was trying to compete with 50 Shades of Gray............ Too bad.

    I won't give up on Gregory, though. Maybe next time will be awesome.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2013

    Can do without this one!

    This is a typical Phillppa Gregory book. It can tedious in parts and very repetitive with the obvious mental problems that the "heroine" had. Not one of my favorites.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    Had me thinking about it for days! Very good

    It was not what I expected. Such a good story when you think about it. This is not so black and white like most of her books. I got that the main character had some issues that manifested themselves in a shocking way to the reader. Read it with an open mind. You will love it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2012

    Last phillipa gregory book i will ever reaf

    The was trash . I cant believe i wasted any time on it

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  • Posted April 2, 2010

    Started Off So Well....

    I usually enjoy books from this period in England's history, and especially ones with strong women characters. Unfortunately, those aspects weren't enough to make this a 5-star read.

    The main character, Alys, becomes increasingly unlikable as the story progresses, and none of the other characters are especially pleasant. After awhile, the story seemed to ramble in several odd (and occasionally icky) directions.

    While the conclusion was dramatic, the book was too long and it seemed like an ending of last resort -- the author couldn't bring resolution in any other way. Too bad the story never reached the potential it seemed to have in the opening chapters.

    (And whatever happened to those little wax figures -- doomed to walk the English countryside for eternity? Or just until a really hot day!)

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 11, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Too Helter Skelter

    Let me preface with this; I love Phillipa Gregory's writing style. And it's because of her writing style that kept me reading this book. I read her other works; The Other Boleyn Girl, Wideacre, The Favored Child.... they were all 4-5 star material. This one.... not so good. I was intrigued with the story line, witchcraft, but I found myself getting dizzy trying to figure out the real character of Alys. Was she a good girl or was she a bad one? I questioned how could someone so devout in her religion be so enticed to practice withcraft? I started off feeling sorry for her in the beginning because of the way life dealt her a bad hand, but as the story developed her character became more deviant, which is not a bad thing, but I found it hard to tag who Alys really was - she was NEVER consistant in character. And there was never any moment in the novel that gave the impression that Phillipa Gregory was trying to create this girl as a schizophrenic with MPD. One minute she wanted to go back to being a Nun, the next she wanted to be a murderer. The story was almost acceptable until the wax dolls were introduced in the story and they actually took on "life" - that took it to a different kind of read. So the story went from drama/romance to fantasy. It's difficult for me to tag what genre this book should be catagorized because it bounced around so much. This must have been Phillipa Gregory's first experimental novel, because it surely does not reflect the great writing style she gives us in her other novels. This is by far not one of my favorite reads of Gregory. If you're a first time reader of P. Gregory, start off with The Other Bolyen Girl.

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  • Posted February 6, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Disappointing Offering from an Otherwise Gifted Writer.

    While I love the way Philippa Gregory can re-create the Tudor world, this book fell short of my expectations.

    Being the descendant of both an accused witch in Salem as well as those who accused her, I wanted there to be a true plot of a "wise woman" with the knowledge of herbs having to deal with the jealousies of those around her and with the changing world of religion. Having Alys, the protagonist, think she was a witch because of her own guilt was a marvelous literary device but those damned bewitched candle-wax Barbie imps plunged the novel into the depths of the ridiculous.

    There were no redeeming or even likable characters. But, Gregory can move a plot forward and the climaxes of her novels are usually worth the wait and boring through characters who are repetitive and monomaniacal about their desires. No such luck here. While the ending did bring some much-needed redemption. The protagonists final act of sacrifice seems out of character and unbelievable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2009

    I Enjoyed It

    It was different, but very interesting and intense. In the beginning you are loving the main character, and feel sorry for her. As you get into the book, and see how she manipulates, you really despise her. Yet you worry that she'll be found out and punished for treason. I love the way Philippa Gregory writes.

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  • Posted July 18, 2009

    Interesting, but disturbing

    I have absolutely no issue with reading about witchcraft, but the main character in this book never seems to come to any conclusive decision about who or what she is. I found her lack or morality- when combined with the witchcraft and Catholicism to be very disturbing. Honestly I am a huge fan of Phillipa Greggory, but after reading this book truly wonder if she was on drugs when she wrote it. It was not cohesive-- and if she was trying to show a character who was mostly disturbed, she did a good job. It reminded me of a bad romance novel with a bit of history thrown in. I could not put it down, because I just kept hoping I would understand the point. It wasn't a bad read, just really weird. Usually give these books to my teenage daughter to read, but with all of the graphic sex, menage e tois and lesbian overtones, I wouldn't share this one. Can honestly say I hated the main character by the end.

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