Wishing on a Star: Constellation Stories and Stargazing Activities for Kids

Wishing on a Star: Constellation Stories and Stargazing Activities for Kids

by Fran Lee
     
 

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If you go outside on a clear night, you can't help yourself. Your head tilts back, your eyes rise up, and you find yourself gazing at the stars . . . WOW! From the beginning of time, people have admired the night sky's beauty.

The night sky is our oldest picture book, and Wishing on a Star retells some of these stories from around the world in simple language

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Overview

If you go outside on a clear night, you can't help yourself. Your head tilts back, your eyes rise up, and you find yourself gazing at the stars . . . WOW! From the beginning of time, people have admired the night sky's beauty.

The night sky is our oldest picture book, and Wishing on a Star retells some of these stories from around the world in simple language that kids can understand.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Nine constellations are introduced with an interesting collection of related craft activities. Ancient peoples, including the Babylonians, Native Americans, Chinese, Romans and Greeks all gave names to groups of stars and made up stories about them. The Big and Little Bear are a good starting place because they contain some of the easiest stars to find¾the North Star and the Big and Little Dippers. The craft activities include glow-in-the-dark paint for straightforward constellation paintings (pattern included), a constellation mobile to hand from a hanger and a paper bag lantern/star map. A list of stargazing equipment and a discussion of the differences between stargazing in the city and country complete this handsome, informative volume. 2001, Gibbs Smith, $9.95. Ages 6 up. Reviewer: Kristin Harris
School Library Journal
Gr 4-5-This title combines brief versions of the mythological origins of nine constellations with related crafts and general stargazing advice. Bloopers mar both text and pictures: Polaris is not "visible from everywhere on Earth," and at least one star in a diagram of the Big Dipper is misplaced, so that a line drawn through it will not intersect the star Deneb as claimed. The other illustrations are a mix of informative (though much simplified) sky charts and decorative little bunnies, squirrels, and other wildlife. The accompanying activities vary inventively, from a simple star mobile to an ancient Greek-style play with paper-bag masks, but some of the directions are overcomplicated or skip potentially tricky steps. Furthermore, Lee enters chancy terrain by presenting some myths as teaching stories, such as that associated with the minor constellation Coma Berenices ("Berenice's Hair"), which commemorates a wife's tonsorial sacrifice to ensure her husband's return from danger, and one of the several tales behind Cygnus, the Swan, whose loyalty to the ill-fated Phaethon should "forever remind us of the importance of friendship." All in all, this is a well-intentioned effort that just tries too hard. Guides such as Milton Heifetz and Wil Tirion's A Walk through the Heavens (Cambridge, 1998) or Janice VanCleave's Constellations for Every Kid (Wiley, 1997) will give young sky watchers more accurate, systematic guidance and inspiration.-John Peters, New York Public Library Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586850296
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
03/12/2001
Series:
Junior Activity Series
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
279,620
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
6 - 12 Years

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Read an Excerpt

If you go outside on a clear night, you can't help yourself. Your head tilts back, your eyes rise up, and you find yourself gazing at the stars in the dark sky . . . WOW! From the very beginning of time, people all over the world have cherished the night sky's amazing beauty and mystery.

How old are the stars? They're older than you and me, older than our parents, and even older than our grandmas and grandpas. In fact, they're older than the oldest thing you can think of! Some stars are more than billions of years old, and some more than billions of miles away! When you look at the stars, it's like looking back in time.

Meet the Author

Fran Lee has illustrated and designed many books in our activity book series including Cooking on a Stick, Haunting on a Halloween, Riding on a Range, Wishing on a Star, and Putting on a Party. Fran lives with her husband in Portland, Oregon.

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