The Witch's Daughter [NOOK Book]

Overview

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

An enthralling tale of modern witch Bess Hawksmith, a fiercely independent woman desperate to escape her cursed history who must confront the evil which has haunted her for centuries

My name is Elizabeth Anne Hawksmith, and my age is three hundred and eighty-four years. If you will listen, I will tell you a tale of witches.  A tale of magic and love and loss.  A story of...

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The Witch's Daughter

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Overview

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

An enthralling tale of modern witch Bess Hawksmith, a fiercely independent woman desperate to escape her cursed history who must confront the evil which has haunted her for centuries

My name is Elizabeth Anne Hawksmith, and my age is three hundred and eighty-four years. If you will listen, I will tell you a tale of witches.  A tale of magic and love and loss.  A story of how simple ignorance breeds fear, and how deadly that fear can be.  Let me tell you what it means to be a witch.

In the spring of 1628, the Witchfinder of Wessex finds himself a true Witch. As Bess Hawksmith watches her mother swing from the Hanging Tree she knows that only one man can save her from the same fate: the Warlock Gideon Masters. Secluded at his cottage, Gideon instructs Bess, awakening formidable powers she didn’t know she had. She couldn’t have foreseen that even now, centuries later, he would be hunting her across time, determined to claim payment for saving her life.

In present-day England, Elizabeth has built a quiet life. She has spent the centuries in solitude, moving from place to place, surviving plagues, wars, and the heartbreak that comes with immortality. Her loneliness comes to an abrupt end when she is befriended by a teenage girl called Tegan. Against her better judgment, Elizabeth opens her heart to Tegan and begins teaching her the ways of the Hedge Witch. But will she be able to stand against Gideon—who will stop at nothing to reclaim her soul—in order to protect the girl who has become the daughter she never had?

Praise for The Witch’s Daughter

“Lushly written with a fascinating premise and an enthralling heroine, The Witch’s Daughter will linger long in memory after the last page has been savored.  Highly recommended.” -- Sara Poole, author of The Borgia Betrayal

"A beautifully written, brilliantly crafted page-turner that completely invests you in the lives and loves of the witch's daughter. A true reading event." --Melissa Senate, author of The Love Goddess' Cooking School

“A lyrical and spell-binding time travel fantasy featuring an immortal witch who must summon all her powers to defeat the evil hounding her through the centuries.” –Mary Sharratt, author of Daughters of the Witching Hill

“With her first novel, author Paula Brackston conjures up a riveting tale of sorcery and time travel. By mixing feminine heroism with masculine might, Brackston successfully captivates readers with characters Bess, an immortal witch, and sinister dark lord, Gideon….  It's almost impossible not to root for the underdog in this magical twist on the classic David vs. Goliath tale. Plus, the skill with which Brackston weaves her characters through time makes this book a fascinating take on global history.” –Marie Claire

"Brackston’s first novel offers well-crafted characters in an absorbing plot and an altogether delicious blend of historical fiction and fantasy." --Booklist

"This pleasantly romantic historical fantasy debut flips lightly between the past experiences of ageless witch Elizabeth Anne Hawksmith and her present-day life in Matravers, England... Bess's adventures are fascinating." --Publishers Weekly

“Stretching her tale over several centuries, British-based Brackston brings energy as well as commercial savvy to her saga of innocence and the dark arts….  History, time travel and fantasy combine in a solidly readable entertainment.” --Kirkus

"An engaging, well-written novel that will appeal to fans of historical fiction and fantasy alike." --Portland Book Review

"Part historical romance, part modern fantasy, The Witch’s Daughter is a fresh, compelling take on the magical, yet dangerous world of witches. Readers will long remember the fiercely independent heroine who survives plagues, wars, and the heartbreak of immortality to stay true to herself, and protect the protégé she comes to love." --NightOwlReviews.com

"The Witch’s Daughter is a wonderful combination of historical fiction and paranormal. Brackston’s story alternates between past and present as she mixes tales of Elizabeth’s early life with the present day, tying in historical events including Jack the Ripper and the horrors of WWI... Overall, a really enjoyable read." --BookBitch.com

"Readers who enjoy historical fantasy built around an epic struggle between good and evil should enjoy this original take on the theme." --HistoricalNovels.info

"An enjoyable read." --Genre Go Round Reviews 

"This tale spans centuries and walks the line between good and the darker side of magic.  Magic and those who possess it have been feared and persecuted throughout most of human history.  Find out what it is like to live for hundreds of years, mostly in solitude, and have to struggle with having the power to help people, but being afraid to use that power." --Affaire de Coeur

“Women will certainly love the independent, feisty female characters, but the narrative is wonderfully imaginative and the plot fast-moving and filled with action. This novel is highly recommended for witches and warlocks alike.” –Historical Novel Society

"The combination of stories from the past and the present meld nicely, and the author adds some clever twists so the reader never knows exactly from whom the next Gideon apparition will arise. Perhaps the best twist is the ending--leaving an opening for another book, but at the same time furnishing the reader with quite a satisfactory ending." --The National Examiner (UK)

"Ambitious and thought-provoking, this book will lure you into vivid, visceral worlds where evil lurks at every turn. The beautifully crafted BOOK OF SHADOWS will be etched on my mind for a long time. What an action-packed, emotionally powerful film it would make too." Sally Spedding, author of STRANGERS WAITING

"An unforgettable story by a highly original new writer." --Rebecca Tope, author of the Cotswold crime series

 

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This pleasantly romantic historical fantasy debut flips lightly between the past experiences of ageless witch Elizabeth Anne Hawksmith and her present-day life in Matravers, England. After a plague kills young Elizabeth's father and siblings in 1627 Wessex, her mother, a gifted healer, seeks help from ruthless warlock Gideon Masters. He exacts a high price, and Bess survives only to be accused of witchery along with her mother, who is captured and hanged while Bess escapes and begins her new life of immortal solitude. Fast-forward to 2007, when Elizabeth trains teenage Tegan to be a hedge witch and shares stories about Gideon, meeting Jack the Ripper while ministering to the Whitehall prostitutes in 1888, and serving as a nurse in 1917 Flanders. Bess's past adventures are fascinating, but there's a sketchy quality to the contemporary sections that diminishes the effect of the grand finale. (Jan.)
From the Publisher

Praise for The Witch’s Daughter

“Lushly written with a fascinating premise and an enthralling heroine, The Witch’s Daughter will linger long in memory after the last page has been savored.  Highly recommended.” -- Sara Poole, author of The Borgia Betrayal

"A beautifully written, brilliantly crafted page-turner that completely invests you in the lives and loves of the witch's daughter. A true reading event." --Melissa Senate, author of The Love Goddess' Cooking School

“A lyrical and spell-binding time travel fantasy featuring an immortal witch who must summon all her powers to defeat the evil hounding her through the centuries.” –Mary Sharratt, author of Daughters of the Witching Hill

“With her first novel, author Paula Brackston conjures up a riveting tale of sorcery and time travel. By mixing feminine heroism with masculine might, Brackston successfully captivates readers with characters Bess, an immortal witch, and sinister dark lord, Gideon….  It's almost impossible not to root for the underdog in this magical twist on the classic David vs. Goliath tale. Plus, the skill with which Brackston weaves her characters through time makes this book a fascinating take on global history.” –Marie Claire

"Brackston’s first novel offers well-crafted characters in an absorbing plot and an altogether delicious blend of historical fiction and fantasy." --Booklist

"This pleasantly romantic historical fantasy debut flips lightly between the past experiences of ageless witch Elizabeth Anne Hawksmith and her present-day life in Matravers, England... Bess's adventures are fascinating." --Publishers Weekly

“Stretching her tale over several centuries, British-based Brackston brings energy as well as commercial savvy to her saga of innocence and the dark arts….  History, time travel and fantasy combine in a solidly readable entertainment.” --Kirkus

"An engaging, well-written novel that will appeal to fans of historical fiction and fantasy alike." --Portland Book Review

"Part historical romance, part modern fantasy, The Witch’s Daughter is a fresh, compelling take on the magical, yet dangerous world of witches. Readers will long remember the fiercely independent heroine who survives plagues, wars, and the heartbreak of immortality to stay true to herself, and protect the protégé she comes to love." --NightOwlReviews.com

"The Witch’s Daughter is a wonderful combination of historical fiction and paranormal. Brackston’s story alternates between past and present as she mixes tales of Elizabeth’s early life with the present day, tying in historical events including Jack the Ripper and the horrors of WWI... Overall, a really enjoyable read." --BookBitch.com

"Readers who enjoy historical fantasy built around an epic struggle between good and evil should enjoy this original take on the theme." --HistoricalNovels.info

"An enjoyable read." --Genre Go Round Reviews 

"This tale spans centuries and walks the line between good and the darker side of magic.  Magic and those who possess it have been feared and persecuted throughout most of human history.  Find out what it is like to live for hundreds of years, mostly in solitude, and have to struggle with having the power to help people, but being afraid to use that power." --Affaire de Coeur

“Women will certainly love the independent, feisty female characters, but the narrative is wonderfully imaginative and the plot fast-moving and filled with action. This novel is highly recommended for witches and warlocks alike.” –Historical Novel Society

"The combination of stories from the past and the present meld nicely, and the author adds some clever twists so the reader never knows exactly from whom the next Gideon apparition will arise. Perhaps the best twist is the ending--leaving an opening for another book, but at the same time furnishing the reader with quite a satisfactory ending." --The National Examiner (UK)

"Ambitious and thought-provoking, this book will lure you into vivid, visceral worlds where evil lurks at every turn. The beautifully crafted BOOK OF SHADOWS will be etched on my mind for a long time. What an action-packed, emotionally powerful film it would make too." Sally Spedding, author of STRANGERS WAITING

"An unforgettable story by a highly original new writer." --Rebecca Tope, author of the Cotswold crime series

Library Journal
Brackston's third novel (after Lamp Black, Wolf Grey and Nutters, the latter written under pseudonym P.J. Davy) shows the author is still inexperienced as a writer. Flashing back and forth in time from 2007 to 1639, her historical romance is slow moving and stilted. Borrowing its main conceit from Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire, Bess, later known as Elizabeth, spends much of the book telling her life's story to a young wannabe witch, apparently against her own better judgment. The language is strained, even in the present-day scenes; in the flashbacks it seems almost as if the period-piece dialog is entirely fabricated rather than researched. VERDICT Public libraries should purchase this only if their patron base is extremely loyal to historical fiction/romance and not particular about the quality. [Library marketing.]—Stacey Rottiers Comfort, Dexter District Lib., MI
Kirkus Reviews

A white witch is pursued across time by her nemesis, a sorcerer who may also have been Jack the Ripper.

Stretching her tale over several centuries, British-based Brackston brings energy as well as commercial savvy to her saga of innocence and the dark arts. Young Bess Hawksmith is a teenager in Wessex in 1627 when the Black Death arrives in her village, killing her father, brother and sister. Bess's survival is a miracle which her mother, Anne, a healer and midwife, won't discuss, although it involves local man Gideon Masters, to whom Bess turns for protection when Anne is arrested for witchcraft and sentenced to hang. But Gideon is a warlock with plans to initiate Bess and then join forces with her. She evades him but uses his magic to escape her own death sentence, then finds herself condemned to an eternity of making amends, with Gideon in pursuit. As a nurse in Victorian London she encounters Masters in two guises, one of whom Bess suspects of savagely murdering prostitutes in Whitechapel. In 1917, on the battlefields of World War I, Bess tends wounded soldiers and finds a man who loves and understands her, but Gideon intervenes again. A contemporary narrative shows Bess befriended by a teenager who becomes her pupil, assisting at the all-female confrontation with Gideon, a fight of elemental proportions.

History, time travel and fantasy combine in a solidly readable entertainment.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429989855
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 1/18/2011
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 6,220
  • File size: 936 KB

Meet the Author


Paula Brackston lives with her family in a wild, mountainous part of Wales and much of the inspiration for her writing comes from stomping about on the mountains beings serenaded by skylarks and buzzards. Visit her website: paulabrackston.com
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Read an Excerpt


Batchcombe, Wessex, 1628
 
Bess ran. The clear night sky and fat moon gave ample illumination for her flight. She feared the dawn, for with it would come the discovery of her absence, and then the hunt would begin. The fetters still fastened around her legs rattled against her anklebones with every stride, a single broken link on each all that remained of her chains. Metal rubbed through young skin until a thin slick of blood trailed in her wake. Her bare feet slapped through the shallow mud, retracing a route that was so familiar as to be imprinted on her mind, clearly mapped, allowing no false turns as she fled beyond the village boundary and ran toward the woodland. Still the short journey felt longer than it ever had, the trees seeming to recede before her, recoiling from her boiling panic, never coming nearer however hard she ran.
An illusion. Merely a trick of the moon shadows. I must not falter.
Her breath sounded loud in her ears, loud enough to wake a light sleeper in an outlying cottage, her heartbeat surely too thunderous to go unheard. She pressed on, at last reaching the cover of the first slender trees. The darkness in the copse was of a different nature. The early spring foliage admitted only fractured moonbeams, and roots and brambles clutched at her from both sides of the path. On she ran. She gasped as stones scraped her soles. She splashed through a brook, the chill water momentarily numbing her wounds before gritty earth from the forest floor forced its way deeper into the lacerations with every footfall. An owl screeched his disapproval of her presence. A badger drew his snout back into his sett, waiting for the disturbance to pass.
The freshness of the night air stung Bess’s throat. Even as it made her cough and fight for breath, she did not slow her pace; nor did she think to care, after so many hours in the stifling confines of her prison cell. Here at least was air to breathe. She crested a small hill and paused, steadying herself against the trunk of a great ash. She could taste the woodland on her tongue: the moss, the silver lichen, the rising sap of the trees. Beyond that, two more things clearly described themselves: her own fear and the sea. Both saltinesses spoke of terror and of freedom. She peered forward along the path and into the heart of the forest. That way lay escape from her captors. That way he would be waiting for her, horses ready, provisions, a plan, a destination to ride for. She pushed herself from the tree, summoning what strength she had left, but something held her back. Something inside her made her wait. Consider, it said, consider the cost of that freedom.
A distant noise caused her to start. Hounds. They would be upon her in moments; she could not hesitate. Yet still that voice would not be silenced. Consider, it warned.
Mother? What should I do?
By way of an answer the night breeze carried the scent of the sea to her nostrils. From the village the baying of the dogs grew louder and was now accompanied by shouts. A movement in the darkness ahead caught her eye. She was sure now she could make out the silhouette of rider and horses. Those who hunted her would take her life, that she knew. But what price would she pay Gideon for her freedom?
No. I shall not go to him. I will not.
She turned and sped down the eastward path, away from the trees, away from the hungry hounds, and away from him. In moments she had broken free of the woods and was racing across springy turf, out in the open, heading toward the one choice left to her: the sea. She felt rather than heard him come after her. She dared not look back now. As she reached the cliff path, a watery sun raised itself above the horizon, bleeding bitter red into the sea. A flat, shadowless daylight replaced the night, leaving Bess exposed. At the cliff’s edge, she stopped. Looking toward the village, she could see torches spluttering in the grayness and make out featureless shapes moving rapidly nearer. Even above the hypnotic rasping of the waves on the rocks below, she could feel hoofbeats shuddering through the earth. Though he did not call out, she could hear his voice inside her head, Bess! Bess! Bess!
Bess would not turn. To meet his gaze would be to lose her own will. Below her the high tide allowed no glimpse of sand, only deep water and bone-shattering limestone and flint. The sun climbed higher, so that when she lifted her eyes heavenward, it was to see an apocalyptic sky before she stepped forward into nothing.
 
My name is Elizabeth Anne Hawksmith, and my age is three hundred and eighty-four years. Each new settlement asks for a new journal, and so this Book of Shadows begins.


 
Copyright © 2010 by Paula Brackston
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Reading Group Guide

With several recent New York Times bestselling novels delving into their secrets, witches have exploded into the public consciousness, and the market for Paula Brackston's enchanting debut has never been stronger. Our heroine's tale as well as her considerable powers spans several centuries, appealing to fans of fantasy/paranormal fans, historical novels, and YA readers alike.

The novel opens in the spring of 1628, when the Witchfinder of Wessex finds himself a true Witch. As Bess Hawksmith watches her mother swing, she knows that only one man can save her from the same fate: the Warlock Gideon Masters. Gideon instructs Bess in the Craft, awakening formidable powers she didn’t know she had. She couldn't have foreseen that even now, centuries later, he would be hunting her, determined to claim payment.

In present-day England, Elizabeth has built a quiet life. But her solitude ends when a teenage girl called Tegan starts hanging around. Against her better judgment, Elizabeth begins teaching Tegan the ways of the Hedge Witch, in the process awakening memories--and demons--long thought forgotten. Part historical romance, part modern fantasy, The Witch’s Daughter is a fresh, compelling take on the enticing yet dangerous world of Witches. Readers will long remember the fiercely independent heroine who survives plagues, wars, and the heartbreak that comes with immortality to remain true to herself, and protect the protégé she comes to love.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 460 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(181)

4 Star

(134)

3 Star

(83)

2 Star

(37)

1 Star

(25)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 461 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 22, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A New Twist on a Witch's Tale

    I loved this book. I was intrigued by the story of Bess, who lives in England in 1628 near a small village. She's a young teenager, living a simple yet happy life with her family on their farm. She has a crush on the local well to do young man, and life is good. The strange man in the woods, Gideon, keeps to himself and is rather mysterious and unsettling. She doesn't know what to make of him.

    Then misery comes to the village, and when all is said and done, Bess is forced to go to Gideon to save her life and keep a promise to her mother. Bess quickly learns what Gideon is all about--he's a warlock--and he's determined to have Bess as his partner in magical power. Bess flees, and so begins her journey through the centuries, always either denying her power as a witch, or using it only for good. Gideon follows her through the centuries, always finding her and forcing her to continue her desperate attempts to have a peaceful life in a new location.

    This was a great read! I am so glad I picked this one up. Paula Brackston writes so well, and her attention to detail brings not only 1628 England to life, but also 1888 London, 1917 France, and modern day England, where Bess is forced to make her final stand against Gideon. He's one nasty creature, and you will fall in love with Bess. She's a wonderful character, who's immortality is both a blessing and a curse.

    If you are curious about magic and the differences in variations on witchcraft, plus just want to read a good story, pick this up. One of my favorite reads this year!

    41 out of 50 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 30, 2011

    just ok

    This book was just ok. The plot was very different from any other book I've read in a while. I really loved the historical references like jack the ripper. However at times it felt like a movie adaptation of a book: characters were not developed to their full potential, a lot of details that would be helpful to the plot are left out or glazed over, and the good parts seem very rushed. The begining is very dull and takes up half the book, the second part is riviting but so short you're left unstatisfied; the climatic ending so so quick you feel like you missed something and need to go back a reread, but the details just aren't there.

    21 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 13, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Really great book. Kept me entertained all the way.

    Really great book. Kept me entertained all the way.

    15 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2011

    loved it. needed it.

    i think the people who did not like this book were expecting more of a science fiction, fantasy type book. full of magic spells, curses, goblins and the like. it was a great story. i have loaned it out to 2 different people since finishing and they have felt the same way. the story of bess and her struggles and triumphs. such a strong person and for so long. the strength of this woman was amazing. she lost her family, friends, could trust no one, was alone for years and years and years. still standing strong. did not lose sight for a second. never forgot who she was or what she was doing.

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 29, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    This is an entertaining epic fantasy

    In 1627, the plague ravages Wessex as well as the rest of England. All of the Hawksmith family dies except for the matriarch and her daughter Elizabeth Anne. The child is unaware that her mom the earth healer made a deal with Satanist warlock Gideon Masters. However, mother and daughter are accused of witchcraft; the locals hang her mom while Bess flees into the night making her own pact with Gideon that begins an eternity of solitude.

    In 2007, Elizabeth trains Tegan the teen hedge witch how to use her powers wisely. She also tells her female student tales about her family especially her mom, her master Gideon and his master, her encounter in Whitehall with Jack the Ripper, and her work as a nurse in the front lines in Flanders during WWI.

    This is an entertaining epic fantasy in which ironically the historical subplots engage the audience; while the modern day segue feels awkward and distracting rather than anchoring the story line. Overall The Witch's Daughter is an enjoyable read as Bess is an intriguing Forrest Gump like witch who's almost four centuries past hopefully will be explored further.

    Harriet Klausner

    9 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 1, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Escapist Fun

    This book is set partly in modern times, and partly in the past. It is a fun tale of the supernatural and of immortality. The main character tells part of the story through journal entries and recounts her experiences as she moves through history. I read a lot of books that include or focus on witches as subject matter, and I found this novel to be unique and original. It is entertaining and causes you to really consider what life would have been like in various eras of the past. Great escapist fun.
    Michael Travis Jasper, Author of the Novel, "To Be Chosen"

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 21, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    A fun read for anyone who enjoys a bit of fantasy in their life.

    A fun read for anyone who enjoys a bit of fantasy in their life. I was surprised at how well the historical tenure of the book meshed with the fiction. I also feel like there could be another book someday which always excites me as a reader.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 12, 2012

    Very interesting

    Loved it! It kept my interest, kept me reading into the late night. I will continue to more of this authors books. Well done.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 2, 2011

    It was OK

    I was excited to read this however did not find it as compelling as I wished. It was ok but not exciting. I didn't find my self engrossed by the story or the characters.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2011

    Different and Entertaining!

    I picked this book up because I needed something different, and had gotten tired of just your average ficton novel. This book is great! Is there some supernatural stuff? Yes... but you WILL NOT BE distracted by it. The characters are great, the past to present and back keeps you interested. If you like historical fiction, this author also includes well known events/times within the story and the images she describes make you feel like you are really there. If you are doubting this book because you aren't in to the witches theme BELIEVE ME, the story itself carries so much emotion and action that the few times ''magic'' is actually used will not matter to you. Besides, doesn't it get boring reading about the ''real world?'' I like to be taken away for a bit and this book DEFINETLY does that. You will enjoy this book if you want to be entertained in to the wee hours of the night. You will fall in love with Bess from the very beginning and will not be able to put this book down!

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2012

    Witch's Daughter

    I enjoyed reasing this book and for the most partfound it well written and intriguing. That sai, I also must agree with the professuinal reviewer who found the "current" writing about Bess' life sketchy at best.
    Are we to belive that after all her years alive, and all her adventures throuh time, this lonely teen age girl is th efirst mortal in hundreds of years that Bess feels is worthy of her training? Come on!
    Then we find out little to nothing about Tegan's lifebeyond as she comes into the story day by day. What of her past, her father, why is her mother such a loser? In or to truly be convinced of the verisimilitude of the relationship between Tegan and Bess, we would need much.more of Tegan's background.and more of why Bess feels she is the one ro train. What is Tegan really about? This story could have been so much more with those details filled in.with as much care and attention as her past lives were given.
    All in all, I have to only give 3 stars bcause every time we are brouht back to the present, and Tegan, I was jerked unhappily out of the "willingness" of any reader to gettruly lost in the truth of the story, and reminded I was reading a book.

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2013

    LOVED IT!!!!!

    What a great read! This is a fabulous tale covering the span of one witches life and her love for the good side of witchcraft. It follows her loves and losses as she spends her life running from an evil man that wishes to posses her, body and soul.

    The way the author went back and forth from the present to the past was wonderful. A lot of times that can be distracting, but Ms. Brackston makes it effortless. This was actually several different stories rolled into one as she reveals different times in Bess's life.

    The story did start a little slow, but after 30-40 pages the pace pickes up and I could not put it down. Bess' story brought tears to my eyes several times. Loved the ending, and hope this is Ms. Brackston's way of continuing this great tale. If not, well..... it is still actually a pretty good ending!

    Brilliant!!!! Will definitely look for more from this author!!

    -- SPeeD

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2012

    Interesting

    It sounds and looks interesting and i look forword to reading it

    2 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2012

    Great novel!!

    I LOVED IT!!!!! Everything about the book was great. A must read novel.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2012

    Good book

    Definately worth it. Enchanting, passionate, and riveting. A must read

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2012

    OMG! Loved this book!

    Read it. Just read it!

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2012

    Enchanting

    A captivating story, mesmerizing writing made you see the story unfold in your minds eye. Hoping for a sequal

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2011

    Very good.

    Great characters!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    Couldn't put it down

    I found that I could not put this book down. The story was well told and made me want more. I look forward to reading more of Brackston's work .

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2013

    Easy and Enjoyable Read!

    I enjoyed the easy eriting style. The story was engaging and interesting and i definitely am lookoing forward to the next book. Plus, it was a bargain to boot. U

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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