With a Daughter's Eye: A Memoir of Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson

Overview

In With a Daughter's Eye, writer and cultural anthropologist Mary Catherine Bateson looks back on her extraordinary childhood with two of the world's legendary anthropologists, Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson. This deeply human and illuminating portrait sheds new light on her parents' prodigious achievements and stands alone as an important contribution for scholars of Mead and Bateson. But for readers everywhere, this engaging, poignant, and powerful book is first and foremost a singularly candid memoir of a ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $11.09   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$11.09
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(15)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
PAPERBACK New 0060975733 **New** copy, unmarked EXCELLENT condition; ships USPS with delivery confirmation in US.

Ships from: Niagara Falls, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

In With a Daughter's Eye, writer and cultural anthropologist Mary Catherine Bateson looks back on her extraordinary childhood with two of the world's legendary anthropologists, Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson. This deeply human and illuminating portrait sheds new light on her parents' prodigious achievements and stands alone as an important contribution for scholars of Mead and Bateson. But for readers everywhere, this engaging, poignant, and powerful book is first and foremost a singularly candid memoir of a unique family by the only person who could have written it.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Natural History
[A]n utter absorbing account of Mead and Bateson's relationship...[This] book is clearly a classic.
San Francisco Chronicle
A beautifully written book...Remarkably honest, rich in poetry, yet, at the same time, full of 'longing and anger.'
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060975739
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/28/1994
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 364
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.91 (d)

Meet the Author

Mary Catherine Bateson is Clarence J. Robinson Professor in Anthropology and English at George Mason University. She received an undergraduate degree from Radcliffe and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. She has written and coauthored numerous books on life history, lectures internationally, and is president of the Institute for Intercultural Studies in New York City. She divides her time between New Hampshire and Virginia.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Prologue



The Aquarium and the Globe



My parents, Gregory Bateson and Margaret Mead, were scientists and teachers, not only in the wider community in which they worked and published, each becoming famous in different ways and touching many lives, but in the domestic circles of family and friendship as well. For them, the intimate was projected onto the widest screen, even as knowledge from far places was worked into the decisions of everyday life. The minds of both sought patterns of completeness, wholes, and so they thought of worlds entire, whether these worlds were minute images of microscopic life within a drop of water or the planet wreathed in cloud.

They thought of worlds and drew me into them. There were worlds to be built and worlds to be imagined, worlds to be held and cherished in two hands and worlds of abstract argument, in spherical tautology. The small primitive societies in which each did ethnographic work were worlds of one kind, complete communities to be described and understood, but along with these there was the challenge to construct and be responsible for the wholeness of family, a world for a child to grow in, a biosphere to protect, the possibility of the bright sphere shattered. Growing up was a passage from the microcosm, a motion through concentric metaphors. Even in the smallest of shared spaces a camera or a notebook stood for a possible opening up to the macrocosm.

A child moves out through concentric worlds even with her first steps, but whether these worlds are encountered as wholes or as fragments and whether they provide an entry to other spheres of imagination and experiencedepend on how they are presented, how attention is gradually shaped and the cosmos gradually unfolded.

In Holderness, New Hampshire, where we spent many summers, a long field runs down toward the lake. At the bottom, just short of the strip of woods that shields the shore, there lies a broad patch of springy moss, like a bright green eiderdown spread out under the trees. This was a place my mother had picked to be alone with me in counterpoint to the large household in which we stayed. We used to wander there for an hour or so, especially in the early morning. Sometimes we found spiderwebs stretched flat above the moss between protruding grass stems, with dewdrops still shining on them. These she showed to me as fairy tablecloths, the damask spun by tiny fingers, with crystal goblets and silver plates still spread out, for the feckless fairies went off to sleep at dawn without cleaning up. Then she showed me red-tipped lichens as small as a pinhead-fairy rosesand searching along the ground we found their serving bowls, the bases of acorns.

My great-grandmother had taught my mother how to identify and draw all the plants of her Pennsylvania childhood, but for me the flowers had only colloquial names and were lenses of fantasy: Indian paintbrush, black-eyed Susan, milkweek, Jack-in-the-pulpit. "I know," she sang, "where the fringed gentians grow."

My father had the English habit of latinizing in the woods or in the garden. The intricacies he showed me between the grass stems were of another sort, perhaps a beetle or a moth living out quite different dramas. When I look at the field with his eyes, I see it as a series of complex symmetries and relationships, in which the position of the spiderweb above the moss hints at the pathways of foraging insects. The petals of daisies can be used to count -- "He loves me, he loves me not" -- because they are not true petals but flowerets -- otherwise their number would be set in the precise morphology of the flowering plants.

"Once upon a time," my mother would narrate as the sun moved higher in the sky, "in the kingdom between the grass stems, there lived a king and a queen who had three daughters. The eldest was tall and golden-haired and laughing, the second was bold and raven-haired. But the youngest was gray-eyed and gentle, walking apart and dreaming." The story varies but the pattern remains the same, woven from the grass of the meadow and the fears and longing of generations. For this king and queen lived in no anarchic world, but in a world of rhythm and just symmetries. Their labors, quests, and loves grew out of each other with the same elegance that connects the parts of a flowering plant and its cycles of growth. At their court, as at the fairies' banquets, crystal goblets and courtly etiquette reflected a social order. Prince and princess find one another in a world of due peril and challenge and happiness ever after. The flower is pollinated, seed is formed, scattered, and germinated. Look! The silk in the milkweed pods is what the fairies use to stuff their mattresses. Blow on the dandelion down to make a wish, anticipating the wind. Pause in the middle of fantasy to see the natural world as fragile and precious, threatened as well as caressed by human dreaming.

Worlds can be found by a child and an adult bending down and looking together under the grass stems or at the skittering crabs in a tidal pool. They can be spun from the stuff of fantasy and tradition. And they can be handled and changed, created in little from all sorts of materials. On a coffee table in the center of our living room, which often held toys and projects of mine, I constructed a series of worlds on trays. One of these was meant to depict a natural landscape, built up from rocks and soil, with colored sand and tinted strawflowers set into it. Another was inspired by a book my father had read to me in which a child constructs a city with cups, dishes, and utensils from the kitchen and then visits it in his dreams. My mother, in that same period, was...

With a Daughter's Eye. Copyright © by Mary C. Bateson. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xi
Preface to the 1994 HarperPerennial Edition xv
I. Prologue: The Aquarium and the Globe 3
II. Baby Pictures 11
III. A Household Common and Uncommon 37
IV. "Daddy, Teach Me Something" 53
V. Coming of Age in New York 71
VI. One White Glove and the Sound of One Hand Clapping 101
VII. Away from This Familiar Land 123
VIII. Sharing a Life 145
IX. Sex and Temperament 163
X. Parables 183
XI. Participant Observers 207
XII. Our Own Metaphor 227
XIII. Chere Collegue 249
XIV. Steps to Death 269
XV. Epilogue: And Part and Meet Again 289
References and Sources 307
Selected Bibliography 309
Notes 313
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)