With Fire and Sword

With Fire and Sword

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by S. H. M. Byers
     
 

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With Fire and Sword by Major S. H. M. Byers, of General Sherman’s Staff, author of “Sherman’s March to the Sea,” “Iowa in War Times,” “Twenty Years in Europe,” and of other books

Copyright, 1911

CH1. My enlistment in Union Army; “Bushwhackers” of Missouri; Quantrells and James

Overview

With Fire and Sword by Major S. H. M. Byers, of General Sherman’s Staff, author of “Sherman’s March to the Sea,” “Iowa in War Times,” “Twenty Years in Europe,” and of other books

Copyright, 1911

CH1. My enlistment in Union Army; “Bushwhackers” of Missouri; Quantrells and James Brothers; Cutting man’s head off; First adventure in war; Capturing a guerrilla
CH2. Leave Missouri-go South; Prisoners of Donelson; Taking of New Madrid; "Kindly bury unfortunate officer”; Quaker guns at Shiloh; Killing of colonel
CH3. Iuka, fiercest battle of war; Awful Rebel charge at Corinth; Moonlight on battlefield; Bushels of arms and legs; Tombstones for fireplaces; One of Grant’s mistakes
CH4. Unlucky campaign led by Grant; Holly Springs burned; First foragers; Some modern Falstaffs; Counting dead men
CH5. The laughable campaign of war; Army floating among tree tops of Yazoo Pass
CH6. Grant’s new plan at Vicksburg; Running Vicksburg batteries; Hour and half of horror; Batteries are passed; Most important event in war
CH7. Crossing Mississippi on gunboats and steamers; Battle of Port Gibson; How Grant looked to private soldier; Boy from Mississippi; Fights at Raymond; Battle of Jackson in thunderstorm; Digging brothers’ grave; Grant in battle; Saving flag; How men feel in battle; Awful spectacle; Critical moment of General Grant’s life; Battlefield letter from him to Sherman
CH8. Assaults on walls of Vicksburg; Logan in battle; Army mule; Promotion under guns of Vicksburg; Storm of iron hail at Vicksburg; Vicksburg clock; Town surrenders; Glad news; Reading my first order to regiment; Regiment put on guard in captured city; Eight days’ furlough in four years of war
CH9. Sherman’s army floats across Tennessee River at midnight; Washington at Delaware nothing compared; We assault Missionary Ridge; Awful battle; My capture
CH10. Libby Prison; Life there; “Belle Isle”; All prisons bad; Great escape; ”Maryland, My Maryland”
CH11. Escaping from Macon; Adventure in Atlanta; In disguise of Confederate soldier; My wanderings inside Confederate army and what I experienced; I am captured as a spy; How I got out of it all
CH12. Under fire of our own guns at Charleston; Trying to capture railway train; Secret band; Betrayed; Desolation of Charleston
CH13. Living in grave; Adventure in woods of South Carolina; Life in asylum yard at capital of South Carolina; Song of “Sherman’s March to Sea”; How it came to be written; Final escape; Burning up South Carolina’s capital
CH14. Army in Carolinas; General Sherman sends for me; Gives me place on his staff; Experiences at army headquarters; Sherman’s life on march; Music at headquarters; Logan’s violin; General’s false friend; Army wades, swims, and fights through Carolinas; I am sent as despatch bearer to Grant; Strange ride down Cape Fear River in night; General Terry; Learn that my song “The March to the Sea” is sung through North and given campaign name; I bring first news of Sherman’s successes to North; Interview with Grant
CH15. Washington City in last days of war; Look, the President!; Last man of regiment

In war some persons seek adventures; others have them in spite of themselves. It happened that the writer of this book belonged to a regiment that seemed to be always in the midst of great experiences. It was, in fact, one of the few regiments that absolutely fought themselves out of existence. It was mustered in a thousand strong; it lost seven hundred and seventy-seven men by death, wounds, and disease. The fragment that was left over was transferred to a cavalry command. When the writer finally escaped from prison, after many months of confinement and many thrilling adventures both in prison and in the army of the enemy, he was mustered out as a “supernumerary officer.” His command had ceased to exist. He was literally the last man of the regiment. Of the eighty of his regiment who had been taken to prison with him all but sixteen were dead. Of the nine captured from his own company all were dead.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014862899
Publisher:
Denise Henry
Publication date:
08/11/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
237 KB

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