Withering Tights (The Misadventures of Tallulah Casey Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Wow. This is it. This is me growing up. On my own, going to Performing Arts College. This is good-bye, Tallulah, you long, gangly thing, and hellooooo, Lullah, star of stage.

Tallulah Casey is ready to find her inner artist. And some new mates. And maybe a boy or two or three.

The ticket to achieving these lofty goals? Enrolling in a summer performing arts program, of course. She's bound for the wilds of Yorkshire Dales—eerily similar to the ...

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Withering Tights (The Misadventures of Tallulah Casey Series #1)

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Overview

Wow. This is it. This is me growing up. On my own, going to Performing Arts College. This is good-bye, Tallulah, you long, gangly thing, and hellooooo, Lullah, star of stage.

Tallulah Casey is ready to find her inner artist. And some new mates. And maybe a boy or two or three.

The ticket to achieving these lofty goals? Enrolling in a summer performing arts program, of course. She's bound for the wilds of Yorkshire Dales—eerily similar to the windswept moors of Wuthering Heights. Tallulah expects new friends, less parental interference, and lots of drama. Acting? Tights? Moors? Check, check, check.

What she doesn't expect is feeling like a tiny bat's barging around in her mouth when she has her first snog.

Bestselling author Louise Rennison returns with her trademark wit, a hilarious new cast, and a brand-new cheeky heroine who is poised to discover plenty of opportunities for (mis)adventure!

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  • Withering Tights
    Withering Tights  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Rennison (the Confessions of Georgia Nicolson books) is back with a new series, this time featuring 14½-year-old Tallulah Casey, a self-deprecating and boy-crazy aspiring actress, as well as—in typical Rennison fashion—a spunky comedian. (Oh, and she's Georgia's cousin, too.) Tallulah heads off to Dother Hall in Yorkshire, a school for the performing arts, to pursue a life on the stage, and it won't take readers long to note that her personality is perfect for the profession. With entertaining scenarios in spades (Tallulah's home-stay family lodges her in what she regularly refers to as "the squirrel room," for instance), a cast of winning new girlfriends, and cute boys everywhere they turn, Tallulah and company work through the trials of adolescence and the mysteries of first romance. British slang is abundant (lots of "snogging," of course, but also less familiar terms like "smalls"). If the nonstop jokes and silliness can become a bit much at times, Tallulah is an effervescent protagonist who will keep fans of YA Brit lit laughing until the very end. Ages 12–up. (July)
Chicago Tribune
“We’re talking laugh-till-the-soda-comes-out-your-nose humor.”
Wall Street Journal
“A jolly and faintly raunchy read.”
USA Today
“Hilarious!”
School Library Journal
“Tallulah is a vivacious and hilarious character who will speak to every girl. This is a wonderful start to a new series that will attract Georgia’s many fans as well as bring in new readers, who will fall in love with Tallulah and all of her quirks.”
Booklist
“A bright, breezy, and very funny take on life. Good fun!”
San Francisco Chronicle
“Refreshing.”
The Horn Book
“This Brit lit romp through the moors will leave readers looking forward to next term and more Tallulah.”
New York Times Book Review
PRAISE FOR THE CONFESSIONS OF GEORGIA NICOLSON:“A little raunchy and quite funny.”
The Daily Express
“Hilarious.”
The Sunday Times
“Expect lots more of Rennison’s unique brand of teen angst, snogging and shenanigans.”
Seventeen
“Hysterically funny.”
Meg Cabot
PRAISE FOR WITHERING TIGHTS:“I don’t know how, but Louise Rennison has done it again. Tallulah is even funnier, warmer, and sweeter than her cousin Georgia Nicolson. I fell in love with Withering Tights, and you will too!”
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"Absurdity is a key point here, and it’s richly delivered by Tallulah’s exploits. Ideal for readers seeking a high-spirited silly British romp."
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
“Absurdity is a key point here, and it’s richly delivered by Tallulah’s exploits. Ideal for readers seeking a high-spirited silly British romp.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Absurdity is a key point here, and it’s richly delivered by Tallulah’s exploits. Ideal for readers seeking a high-spirited silly British romp.”
Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA) (Starred Review)
“Louise Rennison has created another superbly realistic and hilarious young teen heroine, a younger Georgia Nicolson, in the first book of a new series. Tallulah’s wry comments on her life and her dreams are sure to enchant girl readers who will laugh and cry with the spunky, hopeful entertainer.”
New York Times Book Review on The Confessions of Georgia Nicolson
PRAISE FOR THE CONFESSIONS OF GEORGIA NICOLSON:“A little raunchy and quite funny.”
Seventeen on The Confessions of Georgia Nicolson
“Hysterically funny.”
USA Today on The Confessions of Georgia Nicolson
“Hilarious!”
Chicago Tribune on The Confessions of Georgia Nicolson
“We’re talking laugh-till-the-soda-comes-out-your-nose humor.”
San Francisco Chronicle on The Confessions of Georgia Nicolson
“Refreshing.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Absurdity is a key point here, and it’s richly delivered by Tallulah’s exploits. Ideal for readers seeking a high-spirited silly British romp.”
VOYA - Judith Hayn
Louise Rennison has created another superbly realistic and hilarious young teen heroine, a younger Georgia Nicolson, in the first book of a new series. Tallulah Casey is attending summer performing arts school in Yorkshire where she hopes to find that she has a mesmerizing talent for something besides Irish dancing, and perhaps, get snogged (kissed) for the first time in her life. At fourteen-and-a-half, she is tall and gangly with a penchant for blurting out whatever is on her mind while crashing and careening into anything in her path. Feeling like she should be good for more than getting things off the top shelf, she unites with Flossie, Vaisey, and Jo—all intent upon finding fame, romance and maturity on the moors. The humor explodes as Tallulah encounters eccentric teachers, cute prep school boys, the pub owner's sassy young daughter and gorgeous son, plus the cad of the country. The culmination of the artistic experience is an original interpretation of Wuthering Heights written, designed, acted, and produced by the budding thespians. Tallulah's wry comments on her life and her dreams are sure to enchant adolescent girl readers who will laugh and cry with the spunky, hopeful entertainer. Tallulah also provides a glossary for those on this side of the pond. Reviewer: Judith Hayn
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—Rennison introduces Georgia Nicholson's cousin, Tallulah Casey, a girl just as funny and introspective as Georgia herself, if not more so. Tallulah is on her way to a performing-arts school on the Yorkshire Moors—this fact alone has her beside herself thinking about Cathy and Heathcliff. This will be her first time away from home—she'll be on her own with no parents, no little brother—and plans to discover her inner artistic talents and keep her knobby knees tightly under wraps. Tallulah soon meets a fun group of girls as well as Cain, the local cad; Alex, the local swoon-worthy boy; an owl; and Charlie, a boy with potential—and a secret. Readers will be laughing at the teen's adventures and her journey toward artistic greatness during her summer at Dother Hall. Will she end up with Charlie? Does she really hate Cain—or does she secretly "feel funny" around him? Will Alex ever see her as anything but a 14-year-old? Tallulah is a vivacious and hilarious character who will speak to every girl—she's not the most popular or the most beautiful, but she has her own wonderful talents that others start to recognize. This is a wonderful start to a new series that will attract Georgia's many fans as well as bring in new readers, who will fall in love with Tallulah and all of her quirks. A definite must purchase for all libraries.—Traci Glass, Eugene Public Library, OR
Kirkus Reviews

Fans of Georgia Nicolson will be thrilled to meet her cousin Tallulah in Printz Honor–winner Rennison's new madcap melodrama.

Fourteen-year-old Tallulah Casey is headed to summer theatre school in Yorkshire armed with nothing more than a good-luck letter from Cousin Georgia and sheer determination to become a star. Because other than a penchant for breaking into Riverdance whenever she gets nervous, Tallulah has no talent to speak of. Desperate to impress her teachers in order to win a permanent spot at Dother Hall, Tallulah choreographs a bicycle ballet called "Sugar Plum Bikey," which unfortunately ends up having the opposite effect and the added bonus of spraining her ankle. Meanwhile, she's also nursing crushes on three local boys: older Alex, bad boy Cain and sweetheart Charlie. It is almost summer's end before Tallulah gets kissed and discovers that her talent might be making people laugh. But is being funny enough for Tallulah to be asked back after her fake-moustache–twirling turn as Heathcliff in the final summer production? Though some of Tallulah's Briticisms may be confusing to American readers, her utterly hilarious glossary in the back will help. "The Bronte Sisters: Em, Chazza, and Anne...they wrote Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and loads of other stuff about terrible weather conditions and moaning. But in a good way."

Rennison's writing remains reliably, undeniably entertaining; Georgia would be pleased. (Fiction. 12 & up)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062084644
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 6/28/2011
  • Series: Misadventures of Tallulah Casey Series , #1
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 384,770
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Louise Rennison is the internationally bestselling and award-winning author of Withering Tights, A Midsummer Tights Dream, and the angst-filled Confessions of Georgia Nicolson series. She lives in Brighton, the San Francisco of England (apart from the sun, Americans, the Golden Gate Bridge, and earthquakes).

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Read an Excerpt

Withering Tights


By Louise Rennison

HarperTeen

Copyright © 2011 Louise Rennison
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780061799310


Chapter One

On the showbiz express
Wow. This is it. This is me growing up. On my own, going
to Performing Arts College. This is good-bye, Tallulah,
you long, gangly thing, and helloooooo, Lullah, star of
stage and . . . owwwwooo. Ow and ow.
The train lurched and I've nearly knocked myself out
on the side of the door. I'm bound to get a massive lump.
Oh good, I can start college with two heads. . . .
I've been reading my brochure about the summer
school. It has a picture of a big manor house and underneath
it says:
Welcome to Dother Hall. This magnificent center of
the performing and visual arts nestles among the
beautiful Yorkshire Dales.
The staff and friendly local people offer a warm
hand of encouragement to all of our prospective
students. Think Wuthering Heights but with more
acting and dancing and less freezing to death on the
moors!!
Well, it was either this or going on an Outward Bound
course with my little brother, Connor. The last time I went
camping with him he cooked a dead butterfly and made it
into a sandwich for me. For a laugh. He put tomato sauce
on it.
I've been looking over the top of my brochure at the
bloke opposite. He is the grumpiest man in the universe
probably.
He's got no hair on his head, but he has loads of red
hair shooting out of his ears. Like there are a couple of
red squirrels nesting in there. Which would be quite good,
actually, as they are an endangered species.
His wife said to him, "Oooh look, Fred, the sun's coming
out."
And he said, "It can please its bloody self."
Is this what Yorkshire folk are like?
I wonder if anyone is missing me at home?
It will be next week before my grandma notices that
my eggcup hasn't been used. I tried to explain to her that
I was going to performing arts college in Yorkshire for the
summer, and she said, "Will you bring a trifle back?"
Maybe she thought I said I was going to Marks and
Spencers for the summer.
Mum didn't comment because as usual she wasn't
there. She's gone to Norway to paint.
Not people's houses. She's doing her art.
When I stayed over with Cousin Georgia last night, I
asked her what sort of painting the Norwegians did and
she said, "It's mostly sledges."
I thought she meant they painted sledges a lot, but
she said, "No, my not-so-little cousy, they paint WITH
sledges."
She said the official term for that kind of work was
"Sled-werk," and that it was one of the reasons why
Norwegians had such big arms and had therefore become
Vikings (for the rowing). And that if I dropped "Sled-werk"
into a conversation at art college, people would be
impressed.
Georgia knows a lot of stuff. Not just about painting,
but about life. And boys. She wears a bra. It's a big one.
She showed me her special disco inferno dancing and her
lady bumps were jiggling quite a lot.
I wish I wore a bra. And jiggled.
It's so boring being fourteen and a half.
She's nice to me, but I know she thinks I'm just a kid.
When I left she gave me her "special" comedy
mustache. She's grown out of it and thought it would suit me.
She said, "Always remember, Lullah, if in doubt, get your
mustache out."
I do love Georgia and wish I lived near her. I haven't
got a sister and it's not the same having a brother. Connor
mostly likes to talk about what he's going to kick next.
And that I am like a daddy longlegs in a skirt.
And how he could win a kicking contest with a daddy
longlegs.
Is that normal in a boy?
Well, all will be revealed when I start my new life at
Dother Hall.
Georgia's also given me a secret note to read on my
first day at college. She says she will write to me. But will
she?
I feel a bit miz.
Usually in the holidays I stay with Grandma. It was
she who filled in the Dother Hall form for me. In the
section about "talents and special interests" she put "Irish
dancing and ball games."
You would have thought that would be a definite "no"
from them, but they accepted me. Perhaps they thought I
was some kind of dancing juggler.
Anyway, it's only for five weeks and then there is an
assessment and you get chosen to stay on or not in the
proper school.
I will look at the college brochure again to get me in the
creative zone.
Let me see.
Here is a photo of a girl leaping around in the dance
studio. The caption says:
Eliza loses herself in the beauty of modern dance.
As far as dancewear is concerned Eliza has gone for big
tights.
As indeed she needs to.
Oh, and here's a photo of a boy.
What on earth is he holding?
Let's see.
The caption says:
Martin has made an instrument. Here he is holding
his own small lute.
Crumbs.
Martin has got very bright lips.
Perhaps he is a mouth-breather; that makes your lips
go very red.
Or perhaps it is lipstick.
I suppose anything goes in the crazy world of dance and
theater! Hey nonny no, this is my new world, the world of
showbiz!
But what if the course is full of people who can sing
and dance and everything, and are really confident?
And hate me because of my nobbly kneecaps?
Uh-oh, we are arriving at my station. I must get my bag
down. I'll get up on the seat and try and reach it. . . . Oh
great balls of fire, I've just accidentally kicked Mr. Squirrel
as he was getting up.
What does, "You great big dunderwhelp, use your
bloody gogglers!" mean in English?
I bet it's not nice.
His wife said, "Take no notice, love. If there was a
moaning medal, he'd win it hands down."
I let them get off first.
How come everyone else in my family is the right height
and I have knees that are four feet above the ground?
I swung the train door open and saw the sign:
Skipley:
Home of theWest Riding Otter
There was a little bus to take us into Heckmondwhite. I
didn't know sheep could go on buses, but they can. One
was sitting next to me. Not on its own, I mean. It hadn't
just got on with its bus pass. There was a woman in
Wellingtons holding it.
She said to me, "I'd sit upwind if I were thee, love."
We bundled along on the bus on a road that went up
and down dales. Along the skyline I could see the moorland
dotted with craggy outcrops.
The sheep woman said, "That's Grimbottom Peak;
when a fog comes down you can't see your chin in front of
you. Perilous."
Heckmondwhite was just like a proper village. It had a
village green, and a pub, and a post office, a church and a
hall and everything.
I found the Dobbinses' house just off the green round
the corner from the village shop, like the directions said.
I'm not allowed to stay at Dother Hall because I was the
last one to apply for the course and there was no room in
the dormitory.
And do you know why? It's because I haven't got normal
parents. If I had ordinary parents like everyone else
they would have booked early. But oh no, I had to wait until
Dad could get to the post office in Kathmandu so that we
could phone him and he could pay for the course. Why is
he there anyway? He's probably found the only bearded
ant on the planet. Or the last of the Ice Age big-bottomed
goats. He loves that sort of thing. He is like a cross between
David Bellamy and an excitable Great Dane.
Well, at least the Dobbinses will be normal people, married
and so on. They might turn out to be really cool. I
expect they will be. They must be quite laid-back and
avant-garde to take us "artists" in.
I opened the little gate and walked up the path to
knock on the front door. I wonder if I will be in my own
sort of extension bit? I expect so. Maybe with that "loft
living" sort of furniture. All minimal and shiny surfaces
and a Jacuzzi bath. I hope they've got satellite TV
because . . .
The door opened. And a woman in a Brown Owl uniform
said, "Tallulah! Yoo-hoo!! Aren't you nice and tall!!
Come in, come in. Mind your head on the low— Oh dear.
Never mind. Harold is out running the Christian Youth
Table Tennis Club, but the twins will be back from Play
Doh Hour in a minute."
Mrs. Dobbins, or "Call me Dibdobs, everyone does,"
gave me a long hug. She's very pink and enthusiastic. And
covered in badges. One of them said, Knots. Advanced.
She took my bag in her sturdy arms and showed me up
to my room at the top of the house.
My room is mostly wood, with wood extras. It is quite
literally loft living in the sense that it IS a loft.
Dibdobs said, "I'm going to make us a traditional tea
to welcome you. So make yourself at home. You can see for
miles from your window."
She beamed at me through her roundy glasses. She
said, "Oooh, isn't this exciting??"
And gave me another big hug.
I wonder if she has got a "hugging" badge? Probably.
As she went off down the steep wooden steps singing,
the while . . . lalalalala," I looked around my new bijou
home.
It's a sweet room really, you know, good, but I thought
going to performing arts college might be more . . .
gooder-er.
I went to the window.
Yep, you could see for miles.
And do you know what you could see for miles? Sheep.
Oh no, there are some pigs.
I put my bag down on the bed. My bed, by the way, is
wooden. It's got wood carvings all over it. Even the bed
head has got furry things carved into it. Squirrels, I think.
Or maybe hairy, long-tailed slugs.
I put my secret letter from Georgia under my pillow.
For luck.
I unpacked my suitcase and hung my clothes up in the
(wooden) wardrobe. I must start planning what to wear
for my first day at Dother Hall. It will be weird not having
to wear a really crap uniform. I wonder if we are allowed
makeup? At my school, if we had worn makeup we would
have had our heads cut off. And put on the school gates as
a warning to others.
But hahahahaha, I am on my own now.
I am flying solo.
I can cover myself in lipstick from head to foot if I feel
like it.
Not that I will, actually, as I have only got one lipstick.
I need to get a lot more.
I wonder where Boots is in the village?
Dibdobs called me down for tea. I had changed into my
jeans and a rib top and my Barely Pink lipstick. Live as you
mean to go on, I say. In fact, I might go the whole hog and
get some blusher.
had a frilly apron over her Brown Owl uniform
form when I went down into the kitchen. She was just
dishing up sausages and she gave me a super-duper smile.
I had no idea that teeth could be so . . . teethy.
She said, "They're local."
Does it matter that the sausages are local? I'm just
going to eat them, not make friends and go to the cinema
with them.
But she's only trying to be nice; this is how most people
live. I think. But how would I know?
I smiled at her as I sat down in front of my sausages.
And said, "Oh, goodie."
I've never said "Oh, goodie" in my life.
It feels good.
I may say it a lot and make it something I am notorious
for.
Because when I am famous I will have to have a quirky
personality.
I can't just rely on having sticky-out knees.
The door slammed open and a voice shouted, "I've
brought 'em back, I've got most of the worst off, but they'll
need a good soak. Bye."
Dibdobs shouted, "Thanks, Nora."
The door slammed again and two toddlers shuffled
into the kitchen.
Both with bowl haircuts.
Bowl hair with Play-Doh in it.
Dibdobs was busy at the stove and said over her shoulder,
"Hello, boys, this is Tallulah."
They came and looked at me for a bit whilst I was
chewing.
One said, "Goo-morning, did you hear me clenin' my
teeef?"
Um, it wasn't morning. And he didn't have any teeth
except for one waggly one right at the front. And he didn't
look like he would have that for long.
Mrs. Dobby was beside herself with joy.
"Tallulah, this is Max and Sam. Say hello, boys."
One started picking his nose and the other one, Max
(or Sam), said, "They've gotten out, I've been feelin' for
'em but I can't find 'em."
Mrs. Dobby was getting a bit red in the face and her
roundy glasses were steaming up, but she didn't raise her
voice, she just said, "What is it you were feeling for to find,
darling?"
Max, who had just been staring at me and waggling his
loose tooth, piped up.

12
"Snails. Great big sjuuuge ones with sjuuuge shells."
I put my sausage to the side of my plate.
"We put them to seep."
Put them to seep?
Seep where?
They'd better not be seeping anywhere near me.
The boys stared at me all through my jelly and ice cream.
And then, as a bit of light relief, Harold, Mr. Dobby, came
home from his Christian table tennis.
He said, "Hello hello hello! Welcome welcome wel-
come. I'll just pop my table tennis bat in the bat drawer
and I'll be with you."
He's jolly and beamy like Dibdobs and he's obviously
where the twins get their looks from.
He also had a bowl haircut.
Perhaps Dibdobs has got a badge in "bowl cuts." I bet
she has.
Despite his haircut, Harold is so happy. When he heard
that the sausages were local he almost had to go and have a
lie down, he was so thrilled. I like the Dobbinses already,
but I don't know what to do with them.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Withering Tights by Louise Rennison Copyright © 2011 by Louise Rennison. Excerpted by permission of HarperTeen. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 41 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Rummel for TeensReadToo

    Georgia Nicolson's younger cousin with long legs, knobby knees, and no corkers is off to the Yorkshire moors for the summer at a performing arts school. Tallulah can't wait to show off her stuff. She meets a great group of girls after she does a bit of Irish Dancing during the introductions. Tallulah becomes close to the girls who talk about boys, snogging, and daily drama. Tallulah's nervous that she won't make the summer cut and be invited back to the school for the fall. She can't sing, her dancing tends to be a bit wild, and her acting is suspect. Nevertheless, she's having the time of her life and hopes that the final production of Wuthering Heights will push her over the edge of consideration for a permanent place at the school. Louise Rennison starts out a new series that's quite similar to the CONFESSIONS OF GEORGIA NICOLSON series. Georgia and Tallulah both have body issues, they both have a bunch of great friends, and they both are boy crazy. Tallulah lives with a family that rivals Georgia's own crazy family. The quirky school provides the main difference between the two heroines. While it was a cute and funny read, I wish it had been more different instead of just more of the same.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 13, 2012

    seriously for girls ages 12-15

    seriously for girls ages 12-15

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 17, 2012

    Funny!

    Wow this book is freaking hilarious. I really do quite enjoy British humor, and was laughing with every page. It does take a good few chapters to really get into it.

    This story centers on Tallulah Casey, who is the cousin of Georgia Nicolson. (from Louise Rennison's other series) She ends up being accepted into theater camp, at Dother Hall, so she doesn't have to go to regular camp with her little bro and eat "butterfly sandwiches." No serious attachments, just something to do for the summer. She ends up staying with a quirky family from the local town because there wasn't any room left at the college. This family adds a lot of humor to this story. They’ve got 2 crazy little twin boys, who can’t talk well, a mother who is bonkers and a father who is way in touch with his feminine side.

    She meets other girls and makes fast friends, soon to be known as the "tree sisters." They are a unique bunch of girls. Lullah ends up loving "college" and wants to stay. But her marks aren't good enough and she will have to work her butt off to stay permanently.

    Lullah is always talking about how she's got to grow into her legs and that she has a lack of "corkers." Like I said before, this is very funny. Her and her friends end up having little adventures and meeting boys and snogging for the first time.

    It is a quick read and a bit young, but still quite enjoyable. It had a bit of an abrupt ending. I though there were more pages to it, but then it ended. There will be another in the series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2012

    Best Ever

    This Is My Favorite Book A Definite Laugh Your Pants Off Book.I Would Definitly a Very Well Written Book Louis Rennison Rocked This. Also If You Like This Book Read The Book Coming Soon Called A Midsummer Dream.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2012

    Amazing!

    I had read Louise Rennison's other series, the Confessions of Georgia Nicholson, and they were absolutely side-wracking with laughter! I thought that this book would not dissapoint, and I was right. Withering Tights was hilarious!! A must read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2012

    Lol love these books so much...

    This is the best seiries ever!!!!aaaand i suk at spelling...lol

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 21, 2011

    i wish they would make a movie out of this book :)

    Honestly,at the beginning,it's kinda dull.but,starting from chap 4 (i think),it starts to get pretty awesome.i bet there will a lot of hot boys if they make it into a movie. i think if i was tallulah,i will go for Alex.Second choice,might be Cain even though he's kinda rude but i believe there's something special about him.deep deep inside . Ben,definitely not.this guy got issue cuz he kissed me,then acts like it never happened.Charlie,he's already got a girlfriend.over all,it is a great book.i think i like Tallulah more than Georgia.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2014

    Good stuff.

    Just silly enough. Enjoyable read. Will be getting the next one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2014

    Not worth it

    I read it because I was desperate. Boredom does that to you. I think I halfheartedly laughed twice the entire book. It was kinda hard for me to understand and the characters didn't really have any really noteworthy traits or personalities.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2014

    Fab. JD

    Just as great as the Georgia series. Highly recommended.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2013

    Didn't get past first chapter

    Unlike the reviews I read online at B&N, I never found any humor in this book. It reads like a teen book. I never got past the first few chapters.

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  • Posted August 2, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    3.5 Stars This book is the epitome of light reading. It's very

    3.5 Stars

    This book is the epitome of light reading. It's very fluffy & full of nonsensical ramblings from the mind of 14-year-old Tallulah. A lot of what she says & does is very silly or just completely over the top. There was very little plot, the story favoring more the idea of cataloging all the happenings to Tallulah & her group of friends as they go to dance school & interact with local boys & boys from another school. I liked the parts of the story that had nothing to do with the boys because I thought the friendships were much more fun to read about than the fawnings over boys who were mostly boring clods who fumbled through their time with the girls like they had no idea how to function properly around so much estrogen.

    One down side to the narrative was that I found myself wondering sometimes whether or not Tallulah had some kind of mental disorder because a lot of what she thought, said, & did was just so beyond obtuse that it seemed she must be suffering from slight brain damage. Her preoccupation with her breasts, nicknamed "corkers," got very old to the point that I wanted to find a sampling of 14-year-olds & ask them if they were really THAT obsessed with their own breast development to talk, think, & write about them with every other breath.

    That said though Tallulah & her friends were funny & the teachers were absolutely insane. The book was a fast, easy read. I would recommend to younger adults who enjoyed Louise Rennison's other series with Georgia Nicholson as it's similar. I do not recommend listening to the audio version of this book as I did. The author narrates it herself & so the audio goes from barely audible whispering to high pitched shouting sometimes in the same scene which had me constantly wincing & adjusting the volume.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2012

    ?,. Aae

    Yykkkkj,, bplolllllllllllllllllll





    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    Someone please put your name last name and email please

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2012

    Very funny

    Not quite done yet but its really funny

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    Should i read it?

    This book seems like a great book but the describtion of thh n,book doesnt tell me anything!

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 27, 2011

    Loved It! Funny and Fresh!

    A fun and hilarious read from one of our favorite authors, Louise Rennison. My daughter and I read all of the "Georgia Nicholsen" stories and laughed so hard! We still talk about them and frequently quote from the stories. Withering Tights is a great follow up to the series, as there is a family relationship between Georgia and Tallulah, although Georgia's mention is very brief. Tallulah is her own quirky personality, and her adventures are wild and crazy. You'll love it! We ate it up in one day!

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  • Posted July 11, 2011

    Fun to Read

    I'll be honest, Tallulah's no Georgia (I'll miss her dearly)- but this is still the best book I've read all summer. It's funny, charming, and you can see a some of the resemblance between Lullah and her cousin. I'm still wondering why she kept saying "great balls of fire"... but I would definitely recommend reading it. Can't wait for the next book:)

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 9, 2011

    Great summer read for middle school girls (or older fans of Georgie Nicolson!)!

    Tallulah Casey is Georgia's younger cousin. Fourteen and a half years old, to be exact, and every bit as hilarious, with extremely long legs that she's very self-conscious about. Tallulah has been accepted to a Performing Arts College Summer School in the moors of Britain- basically in the middle of nowhere. Because she applied late, she doesn't get to stay in the dorm. Instead she stays with a funny family in town with two little mischievous boys. The family is a bit odd, and they put her in a small wooden room and give her handmade furry squirrel slippers. Tallulah has a bit of a hard time adjusting to the school- disaster after disaster occurs as she tries to discover her talent and earn herself a permanent place in the program. Meanwhile, she makes some crazy friends- tiny but strong Jo, loyal Vaisey, and boy-magnet Honey, among others. Tallulah and her friends meet up with some boys from a nearby school, and they discover that teenage boys aren't quite what they had expected. Tallulah also tries to avoid Cain, a local boy who reminds her strongly of Heathcliff because of his deplorable manners.

    The title, Withering Tights, acknowledges the desolate setting, crazy Cain, and the musical version of Wuthering Heights that the school puts on at the end of term. One of the most fun things about this book is the local pub-owner's daughter, Ruby, who follows Tallulah around like a younger sister. Ruby and Tallulah find some owl eggs and get to see the chicks! Ruby also has an older brother named Alex, who is going away to a performing arts school in Liverpool. Tallulah, of course, has a secret crush on Alex, but Ruby finds this to be disgusting.

    There's also a very helpful dictionary at the end of the book which helps with the slang. Here's an example: "corkers: Another word for girls' jiggly bits. Also known as norkers. Honkers, etc. Cousin Georgia calls them 'nunga-nungas.' She says because when you pull them out like an elastic band, they go nunga-nunga-nunga. I will be the last to know whether this is true or not." This dictionary is funny even if you don't need to look up the words!

    I really enjoyed this book- it was definitely zany and cute. Four stars! The only downside was that it really reads in a fourteen-year-old's voice, so it was like spending a lot of time with my younger sister. Because of this, I would recommend it mostly to middle school girls, but fans of Georgia Nicolson would probably enjoy it a lot, too. The references to Wuthering Heights add to the depth of the story, but you probably don't need to have read Wuthering Heights to enjoy this book- some info is included in the dictionary.

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