Without a Woman to Read: Toward the Daughter in Postmodernism

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A philosophical questioning of reading and writing that focuses on metaphors of women and women's roles in our cultural and intellectual heritage.
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Overview

A philosophical questioning of reading and writing that focuses on metaphors of women and women's roles in our cultural and intellectual heritage.
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction—Regarding Silence

Iphigenia and Other Elisions

A Woman's Death

The death of the literal,
the death of a woman

A) Daughters—part 1

B) Sisters—part 1

i) Antigone is not tragic;
she works without producing

ii) Death of, exactly, a sister.

Christ and Word, the Son of the Eternal

Christ as the failure of extension (speaking without determination)

Writing Christ, saying Christ

B) Sisters—part 2

i) Sisters as token of exchange

a) An excess of meaning; desire exceeds (is the form of) economy

b) On Speaking—Who is it who gives the gift?

c) Politics inside (and outside) the Economies (and Aesthetics) of Self and Other

ii) Consider the sister, Dorothy Wordsworth

a) Irony/Clothing/Seduction

b) Obligation or event

iii) The paradigmatic sister, Antigone

C) Mothers

i) Structuring time: from indefinite to definite

ii) Flesh to the order of God

A) Daughters—part 2

i) Daughters in time

ii) Politics

Bibliography

Index

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2005

    radical brilliance

    I had Dr. Price as a professor at the University of Houston for a semester, and thus was able to experience his liberal style of teaching, that is, emphasizing the importance of each student's novel ideas rather than focusing on what may traditionally be accepted. This, in a sense, is a radically liberal book about writing radically liberal ideas. These ideas include an analysis of how women in society serve as a metaphor for the complexities of language and writing, and also an even more radical argument of 'Christ' being 'just a word' through which we need to find an underlying meaning in order to understand the people using that word. In presenting these ideas, Dr. Price even acknowledges that some people will not be ready to accept them, claiming that 'we are not certain of what will be produced in the reader, nor even the reader's kindness, understanding, or goodwill, yet we write' (p.316), thus proving that liberal people can give us new perspectives of looking at the world, and we have to be just as open-minded in order to enrich our lives with these ideas. This book is very worth reading, if you are willing to open your mind to explore the meaning of ideas that are radical, modern and deeply philosophical. Dr. Price proves to be extremely articulate in writing this book; I could not see any hint of this being written and edited over an eight-year span. I would recommend this to feminist philosophers, social philosophers, linguists, or anyone who wants to gain some new insight into how to look at the things around us that we may sometimes take for granted.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2003

    incoherent

    I picked up this book on a whim and I have to say that the fact that this book was even published is a stain on the reputation of SUNY press. Obviously Price is very taken with the French Deconstructionists, but he neither has the command of prose or the historical knowledge of linguistics and philosophy to truly bring out any relevant (and unfortunately coherant) observations about, well, anything. This book is a huge mess that has no continuity and jumps from subject to subject, expecting the reader to keep up but without any underlying meaning.

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