Wizard at Large (Magic Kingdom of Landover Series #3)

( 31 )

Overview

Questor Thews is only a semi-competent wizard, but when High Lord Ben Holiday and his love Willow need use of his powers, he tries to comply. He tries, all right, but he doesn't have all that much faith in himself--not since he turned a terrier into an imp. Still, he'll do what he can....

The peace in Ben Holiday's Magic Kingdom is suddenly shattered as Court Wizard Questor tries to return the dog Abernathy to human form--and fails. Now Ben must travel to Earth, ...

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Wizard at Large (Magic Kingdom of Landover Series #3)

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Overview

Questor Thews is only a semi-competent wizard, but when High Lord Ben Holiday and his love Willow need use of his powers, he tries to comply. He tries, all right, but he doesn't have all that much faith in himself--not since he turned a terrier into an imp. Still, he'll do what he can....

The peace in Ben Holiday's Magic Kingdom is suddenly shattered as Court Wizard Questor tries to return the dog Abernathy to human form--and fails. Now Ben must travel to Earth, accompanied by his green love, Willow, to find Abernathy. With Willow and Ben suddenly in danger, Questor attempts to use his magic to save them.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
A spell to restore the Court Scribe of Landover to human form backfires, and Landover's King embarks on a quest to his native world to rescue his friend and retrieve the medallion of Kingship from the clutches of a greedy wizard. Humor abounds in this engaging fantasy as Brooks continues the adventures of King Ben, Questor Thews, Abernathy, and their companions. Recommended where the series is popular.
Library Journal

Brooks's "Magic Kingdom of Landover" books were first published between 1986 and 1995 as lighter fare than his epic "Shannara" series. While these titles may have recently languished on library shelves, interest may perk up as the series is currently under film option, and a new title is scheduled for 2009. In this third episode, originally released in 1988, Ben Holiday, nicely settled in as high Ruler of Landover, has his life upset when Court wizard Questor Thews determines to undo the magic that has Abernathy, the Court Scribe, in talking dog form. Borrowing the medal that has allowed Ben to move between his home in the United States and the magical kingdom of Landover, Questor promptly sends Abernathy-complete with medal-somewhere, unexpectedly exchanging him for a bottle that contains a nasty demon. Leaving Questor to deal with the black mischief caused by the demon in Landover, Ben has the wizard send him after Abernathy, who has fallen into the clutches of an exiled former king now living near Seattle. Dick Hill, known chiefly for his straightforward readings of thrillers, demonstrates his considerable ability to use varied voices, giving life to a large cast of human and imaginary characters. This lighter work is recommended for all collections that include fantasy fiction; it is likely to appeal to older Harry Potter fans, as well as those who prefer family friendly audio. [Brooks is the bestselling author of more than 25 books. Wizard at Large is also available in an abridged edition: 4 cassettes. 7 hrs. ISBN 9781587883781
—Janet Martin

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345362278
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 7/28/1989
  • Series: Magic Kingdom of Landover Series , #3
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: REISSUE
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 316,136
  • Lexile: 830L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.86 (w) x 4.08 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Meet the Author

Terry Brooks
Terry Brooks published his first novel, The Sword of Shannara, in 1977. It was a New York Times bestseller for more than six months. He has published twenty-five New York Times bestsellers since. Two of those--the novels Running with the Demon and A Knight of the Word--were chosen by the Rocky Mountain News (Denver) as among the best fantasy novels of the twentieth century. A practicing lawyer until his third book was published, Brooks now writes full-time. He lives in the Pacific Northwest with his wife, Judine.

Biography

"I found my way to fantasy/adventure. When I got there, I knew I'd found a home," said Terence Dean Brooks, creator of the blockbuster, New York Times bestselling Shannara, Landover, and Word & Void series. Not only is Brooks at home in the highly competitive realm of fantasy literature, many would call him the genre’s modern-day patriarch – Tolkien’s successor. While that title is debatable, Brooks is, without a doubt, one of the world’s most prolific and successful authors of otherworld (and our world) fantasy. Few writers in any genre can boast a more entertaining collection of work – and a more ravenous and loyal fan base -- than can Terry Brooks.

The most rewarding aspect to writing for Brooks is “when someone who never read a book reads [one of mine] and says that the experience changed everything and got them reading.” Because of his very engaging, quick-flowing writing style, countless numbers of young people have been introduced to the wonderful world of reading through Brooks’s adventures. The miraculous thing, however, is that these same fans – whether they’re now 20, 30, or 40 years old – still devour each new release like a starving man would a steak dinner. Credit Brooks’s boundless imagination, endearing characters, fresh storylines and underlying complexities for keeping his older, more discerning audience hooked.

Brooks began writing when he was just ten years old, but he did not discover fantasy until much later. As a high school student he jumped from writing science fiction to westerns to adventure to nonfiction, unable to settle on one form. That changed when, at the age of 21, Brooks was introduced to J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Tolkien provided Brooks with a forum “that would allow him to release onto paper his own ideas about life, love, and the wonder that fills his world," according to his web site.

In 1977, after six trying years, Brooks published novel his first novel, The Sword of Shannara. And quickly it gave him – and his publisher (the newly created Ballantine imprint, Del Rey) – quite a thrill; the fantasy adventure featuring the young Halfling, Shea Ohmsford; the mysterious wizard Allanon; Flick, the trusty companion; and the demonic Warlock Lord, was not only well received -- it was a smash, spending over five months on The New York Times bestseller list. In 1982 Brooks released the follow-up, The Elfstones of Shannara (which Brooks says may be his favorite), to equal success. He closed out the initial trilogy in 1985 with The Wishsong of Shannara, and has since completed two more Shannara sets, The Heritage of Shannara books and the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara books.

As fans of Brooks know, the man doesn’t like to stay put. “I lived in Illinois for the first 42 years of my life, and I told myself when I left in 1986 that I would never live any one place again,” Brooks said. He now spends his time between his homes in Seattle and Hawaii; he and his wife also spend a great deal of time on the road each year connecting with the fans. These same nomadic tendencies are also apparent in his writing. Instead of staying comfortably within his proven, bestselling Shannara series, Terry frequently takes chances, steps outside, and tries something new. His marvelous Landover and Word & Void series are the results. While both are vastly different from Shannara, they are equally compelling. Word & Void – a contemporary, dark urban fantasy series set in a fantasy-touched Illinois – is quite possibly Brooks’s most acclaimed series. The Rocky Mountain News called the series’ first two books (Running with the Demon and The Knight of the Word “two of the finest science fiction/fantasy novels of the 20th century.”

Good To Know

When The Sword of Shannara hit The New York Times bestseller list, Brooks became the first modern fantasy author to achieve that pinnacle.

The Sword of Shannara was also the first work of fiction to ever hit The New York Times trade paperback bestseller list. Thanks to a faithful and growing fan base, the books continue to reach the list.

Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace was not Terry's first novelization. He also novelized Steven Spielberg's 1991 movie, Hook.

Brooks’s The Phantom Menace novelization is also not his only connection to George Lucas. Both The Sword of Shannara and the original Star Wars novel, A New Hope, were edited by Judy Lynn del Rey and published in the same year (1977) to blockbuster success.

The Sword of Shannara was initially turned down by DAW Books. Instead, DAW sent Terry to Lester del Rey, who recognized Terry’s blockbuster potential and bought it. And the rest, they say, is history.

Brooks’s influences include: J.R.R. Tolkien, Alexander Dumas, James Fenimore Cooper, Sir Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and Mallory's Morte d'Arthur.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Terence Dean Brooks (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Pacific Northwest and Hawaii
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 8, 1944
    2. Place of Birth:
      Sterling, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, Hamilton College, 1966; J.D., Washington and Lee University
    2. Website:

Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 31 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 31 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2012

    Very enjoyable light reading

    Good book for those who enjoy light fantasy on the level of Harry Potter.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    My Thoughts On 'Wizard At Large'...

    Questor finds the answer to change Abernathy back to a full man. (What harm could come of that?) Because of something as minor as a sneeze, the Wheaten Terrier and the medallion are gone! (For someone who must give the medallion up willingly, Ben has a real hard time keeping it in his possession.) In the place of the missing court scribe is a bottle. How odd. It's a very dangerous bottle with a dark secret inside, and Fillip and Sot covets the treasure. Questor doesn't remember where he recognizes it from until it's too late.
    Abernathy finds himself transported to Ben's world with the medallion. With the help of a little girl Elizabeth, the two do their best to get him back to home to Landover. Being that the younger you are, the more likely you are to believe in the magic, Elizabeth has no problems with Abernathy's appearance or story of how he was once a man turned into a dog and about how he got inside the locked display case. She loves him.
    He is trapped in the castle of the son of the old king of Landover. Michel was tutored by Meeks when he was still the king's wizard. Michel learned to love dark magic and was fond of cruelty, especially to animals. He immediately recognized Abernathy for who he really is, and he wants the medallion hanging from around his neck, (to return to Landover and rule the kingdom as its king).
    After Elizabeth rescues him from his animal cage in the dungeon, she delivers him into the hands of a man who she believes can help him get from Washington all the way to Virginia. Unfortunately, the man only sees dollar signs when he hears Abernathy talk.
    Questor remembers that the bottle holds a very mischievous imp. The Darkling draws its power from the holder of the bottle. The darker, meaner, and more evil the holder, the more powerful the Darkling and it's magic.
    Chasing the bottle across the fantastical lands of Landover prove to Ben that he is not getting them any closer to gaining possession of the bottle. So Ben decides to return to his world to rescue Abernathy and retrieve his medallion. Willow goes with Ben, leaving Questor acting regent in his absence.
    In Ben's world there is no magic, so Abernathy, (transformed by magic), and Willow, (a creature of fairy), are dying. Because of the science and industry, the earth, water, and air are polluted and poisonous. Willow must transform, and her time is upon her. With no other options left to him, Ben calls Miles, his former law partner to help, and lets him in on what it is that he's been up to since he left the law firm. How else is he supposed to get him and Willow from Las Vegas to Wootinville?
    In the meantime Questor is doing everything that he can. He feels terribly guilty and responsible for what has happened, because it is his fault that Abernathy is a dog, and that he is gone from Landover, and that the medallion was magiced away from Ben. He continues to travel all over Landover chasing after the Darkling and its bottle. Every holder of the bottle falls into the same seductive trap of the Darkling's magic. However, the real trouble begins when the bottle finds his way in the cruelest hands of all, in Nightshade's possession!
    With Willow and Abernathy's health failing fast, Ben improvises a plan to get Abernathy out of Michel's super secure castle, with Elizabeth's help. Lucky for Ben its Halloween night, so Willow's green skin and hair and Abernathy's dog mask are easily explained. Their luck runs out as...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Wizard At Large, the Magic Kingdom of Landover series, Book 3

    Questor finds the answer to change Abernathy back to a full man. (What harm could come of that?) Because of something as minor as a sneeze, the Wheaten Terrier and the medallion are gone! (For someone who must give the medallion up willingly, Ben has a real hard time keeping it in his possession.) In the place of the missing court scribe is a bottle. How odd. It's a very dangerous bottle with a dark secret inside, and Fillip and Sot covets the treasure. Questor doesn't remember where he recognizes it from until it's too late.
    Abernathy finds himself transported to Ben's world with the medallion. With the help of a little girl Elizabeth, the two do their best to get him back to home to Landover. Being that the younger you are, the more likely you are to believe in the magic, Elizabeth has no problems with Abernathy's appearance or story of how he was once a man turned into a dog and about how he got inside the locked display case. She loves him.
    He is trapped in the castle of the son of the old king of Landover. Michel was tutored by Meeks when he was still the king's wizard. Michel learned to love dark magic and was fond of cruelty, especially to animals. He immediately recognized Abernathy for who he really is, and he wants the medallion hanging from around his neck, (to return to Landover and rule the kingdom as its king).
    After Elizabeth rescues him from his animal cage in the dungeon, she delivers him into the hands of a man who she believes can help him get from Washington all the way to Virginia. Unfortunately, the man only sees dollar signs when he hears Abernathy talk.
    Questor remembers that the bottle holds a very mischievous imp. The Darkling draws its power from the holder of the bottle. The darker, meaner, and more evil the holder, the more powerful the Darkling and it's magic.
    Chasing the bottle across the fantastical lands of Landover prove to Ben that he is not getting them any closer to gaining possession of the bottle. So Ben decides to return to his world to rescue Abernathy and retrieve his medallion. Willow goes with Ben, leaving Questor acting regent in his absence.
    In Ben's world there is no magic, so Abernathy, (transformed by magic), and Willow, (a creature of fairy), are dying. Because of the science and industry, the earth, water, and air are polluted and poisonous. Willow must transform, and her time is upon her. With no other options left to him, Ben calls Miles, his former law partner to help, and lets him in on what it is that he's been up to since he left the law firm. How else is he supposed to get him and Willow from Las Vegas to Wootinville?
    In the meantime Questor is doing everything that he can. He feels terribly guilty and responsible for what has happened, because it is his fault that Abernathy is a dog, and that he is gone from Landover, and that the medallion was magiced away from Ben. He continues to travel all over Landover chasing after the Darkling and its bottle. Every holder of the bottle falls into the same seductive trap of the Darkling's magic. However, the real trouble begins when the bottle finds his way in the cruelest hands of all, in Nightshade's possession!
    With Willow and Abernathy's health failing fast, Ben improvises a plan to get Abernathy out of Michel's super secure castle, with Elizabeth's help. Lucky for Ben its Halloween night, so Willow's green skin and hair and Abernathy's dog mask are easily explained. Their luck runs out as...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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