Wizard's First Rule [NOOK Book]

Overview

Wizard's First Rule, the first novel by Terry Goodkind, was a phenomenon from the moment it was published by Tor Books in 1994, selling more than 100,000 copies in North America alone. It still sells more than 100,000 copies a year and has gone on to bestsellerdom in the United Kingdom and in more than twenty foreign translations as well as audiobook form.

It is now being developed as one of the most ambitious television miniseries of all ...
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Wizard's First Rule

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Overview

Wizard's First Rule, the first novel by Terry Goodkind, was a phenomenon from the moment it was published by Tor Books in 1994, selling more than 100,000 copies in North America alone. It still sells more than 100,000 copies a year and has gone on to bestsellerdom in the United Kingdom and in more than twenty foreign translations as well as audiobook form.

It is now being developed as one of the most ambitious television miniseries of all time. Executive Producer Sam Raimi (director of the three Spider-Man movies), in collaboration with Disney/ABC, is creating a 22-episode adaptation of the book to be filmed in New Zealand.

Richard and Kahlan's story unfolds over ten more novels, collectively known as the Sword of Truth series, concluding with Confessor in 2007. Placing Goodkind in the elite club of #1 New York Times bestselling authors, the series has sold more than twenty million copies to date worldwide.

In Wizard's First Rule, Goodkind introduced the world to an ordinary forest guide, Richard Cypher, and the mysterious, powerful woman he comes to love, Kahlan Amnell. Learning his true identity, Richard accepts his destiny as the one man who can stop the bloodthirsty tyrant Darken Rahl. Hunted relentlessly, betrayed and alone, Kahlan calls upon Richard to reach beyond his sword and invoke something more noble within himself as the final confrontation with Darken Rahl looms.

The importance of Wizard's First Rule is sourced in Goodkind taking on the toughest of all literary challenges: to tell an electrifying story of action, violence, and adventure that also makes people think, and that would influence the choices and actions of its readers.

Years after reading Wizard's First Rule, Goodkind fans still ask themselves, "What would Richard do?" when confronted with life's obstacles and challenges. "Your life is yours alone," Richard says at a key moment. "Rise up and live it."

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Terry Goodkind is the New York Times bestselling author of twelve books. His first novel, Wizard's First Rule, immediately established him as one of the world's bestselling authors. Originally published in 1994, it is the first in the eleven book Sword of Truth series, which has sold over 25 million copies worldwide.

Goodkind was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, where he also attended art school, one of his many interests on the way to becoming a writer. Besides a career in wildlife art, he has been a cabinet maker and a violin maker, as well as having done restoration on rare and exotic artifacts from around the world. In recent years he has spent the majority of his time in the desert Southwest.

SERIES DESCRIPTIONS

From classic book to classic film, RosettaBooks has gathered some of most memorable books into film available. The selection is broad ranging and far reaching, with books from classic genre to cult classic to science fiction and horror and a blend of the two creating whole new genres like Richard Matheson's The Shrinking Man. Classic works from Vonnegut, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, meet with E.M. Forrester's A Passage to India. Whether the work is centered in the here and now, in the past, or in some distant and almost unimaginable future, each work is lasting and memorable and award-winning.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013925960
  • Publisher: RosettaBooks
  • Publication date: 9/14/2010
  • Series: RosettaBooks into Film , #14
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 9,421
  • File size: 977 KB

Meet the Author

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Terry Goodkind is the New York Times bestselling author of twelve books. His first novel, Wizard's First Rule, immediately established him as one of the world's bestselling authors. Originally published in 1994, it is the first in the eleven book Sword of Truth series, which has sold over 25 million copies worldwide.

Goodkind was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, where he also attended art school, one of his many interests on the way to becoming a writer. Besides a career in wildlife art, he has been a cabinet maker and a violin maker, as well as having done restoration on rare and exotic artifacts from around the world. In recent years he has spent the majority of his time in the desert Southwest.

SERIES DESCRIPTIONS

From classic book to classic film, RosettaBooks has gathered some of most memorable books into film available. The selection is broad ranging and far reaching, with books from classic genre to cult classic to science fiction and horror and a blend of the two creating whole new genres like Richard Matheson's The Shrinking Man. Classic works from Vonnegut, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, meet with E.M. Forrester's A Passage to India. Whether the work is centered in the here and now, in the past, or in some distant and almost unimaginable future, each work is lasting and memorable and award-winning.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 1048 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(837)

4 Star

(123)

3 Star

(42)

2 Star

(20)

1 Star

(26)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 1050 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 30, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Wizard's First Rule: People are stupid....

    That is if they don't read this novel. I must admit that I first got into this because of the show Legend of the Seeker. Which got me hooked on from the very first second of the opening. As the show progressed I found out that it was based on novels and I quickly searched for them and added them to my list of books to buy. I finally bought all of the books and finished Wizard's First Rule and Holy Mother Confessor it is one of the best books I have ever read in my life. Each character is so unique but so connected to each other that you would think they were real people. The way they are written and how they interact and how they react to each other, everything just makes them believable. I feel as if I know them in real life. But it's not only the characters that are just WOW! It's the plot, the story, the lands. EVERYTHING! I don't want to give anything away, but watching the show I kind of knew how things ended. I mean, I know that the show and the books are totally different but I knew what happened to the characters. But at times when they were in danger I still held my breath and grew worried that they would be gone. Not only from the novel but from my life. Terry Goodkind is an amazing writer who created an amazing world full of loveable characters. This is one book I say you HAVE to read. That is if you want to know what great literature is. I did find a few grammar mistakes and such but they were very minor like a letter missing or a word was repeated. But put that aside, and you have a masterpeice in your hands. I will definatly have to re-read this book again in the very near future. Watch the show and read the books.

    35 out of 39 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 16, 2009

    Couldn't get past the graphic torturing of young boys.

    I really thought this book was good until about a third of the way through it. I was appalled by the grown man who likes to rape little boys and likes to "feel them squirm", but I couldn't read past the part where Darken Rahl murders a young boy, then proceeds to (in graphic written detail) cut him open and remove every organ in his little body from his brain down to his testicals. <BR/><BR/>I get that the villains in books are going to preform abhorrent atrocities, but I can't stomach them being written in such graphic detail. This is definitely an author and series that I'll avoid with great berth in the future.

    20 out of 61 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 10, 2010

    Great stories, awful writing.

    I'll comment on the whole series for anyone who's thinking of reading all the books (11 full-length novels and one novella). These are (mostly) great stories combined with awful writing. Conversations and monologues ramble on. A character asks someone what it's like to be old. The answer rambles on and had nothing to do with the story. A Mord-Sith hits a subject with her Agiel a mere 5 times and he is fully broken. In the first book, Denna's subjugation of Richard went on ad nauseum for 50 mind-numbing repetitive pages. At one point, two characters subdue a bad guy and then engage in a debate about the difference between love and loyalty. Had nothing to do with story. (Needless to say, the bad guy who had been incapacitated made his escape.) Here is an excerpt showing what could be the worst paragraph+ ever to appear in a fantasy novel; the women in question had earlier been naked for no reason): They were, after all, wearing their finest dresses: WOMAN1 in a dark dress slimming to her size; WOMAN2, her brushed and neat gray hair complementing her deep green dress banded with lace at the collar; WOMAN3 in a simple dress, black, as her dresses always were, laced at the bodice in a way that accented the shape of her bosom; WOMAN4 in a red dress, a color she favored, and with good reason, the way it set off her thick mane of dark hair, to say nothing of exhibiting her exquisite form; WOMAN5 in a dark blue dress that revealed her reasonably shapely figure and went well with her sky blue eyes; and WOMAN6 in her own becoming attire, a shade of blue much lighter than WOMAN5's and trimmed with tasteful ruffles at her cleavage and wrists, and unadorned at the waist so as not to hide her well-formed hips. ("tasteful ruffles"???) "Richly detailed" is one thing, but this is beyond the pale. Goodkind repeats then repeats and repeats then repeats ad nauseum. He rehashes facts which have already been presented, often when it had nothing to do with what was taking place at the moment. The graphic violence and sex could have been dispensed with as being gratuitous. ("tasteful ruffles"???) Richard and Kahlan are powerfully in love--that is relevant to one sub-plot. But it's taken to a ridiculous level. During a pitched battle, they exchange "I love you"'s. One time they walk through the hall surrounded by others, and stop, to make out. One time they question a possibly dangerous and threatening individual, and they think about making out. When they're in the same room, Kahlan thinks of having Richard in her bed or being in his arms. This is a fantasy epic, not Danielle Steele. In the first book, we have a scene of Kahlan crying her eyes out. It was truly a bad situation, but Kahlan is really "more than a woman"--instead of bawling like a baby, she could have (and should have) shown steely, stoic resolve or defiance. Not to mention countless times she, and other (more-than) women, cry, or have a "tear ran down her cheek". ("tasteful ruffles"???) Plot-wise, parts were overtly political and religious--perhaps that could've been cut down. So why did I read (plod through) these books? Because generally the stories are fantastic--exciting, full of action and mystery, with interesting twists. At one point two characters are described: "They both spoke with a quiet economy of words that added an air of nobility to their bearing.&quot

    17 out of 38 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    And to think that a tree died for this.

    I've read a lot of books. I'm particularly fond fantasy and sci-fi and will finish a thousand page novel in a day or two if it captures my interest. I've read through several Goodkind series in my youth and after seeing such glowing reviews for this one thought I might revisit my old stomping grounds. I only got about half way through the book before I traded on SwapTree.

    Where do I even begin? Besides not finding a single original idea in the first 400 pages of the book:

    The characters were drab, unemotional and altogether unbelievable.
    The plot was static, predictable, and quite linear.
    The writing was uninspiring and not particularly eloquent.
    And finally, I had to force myself to continue reading as long as I did.

    Case in point, the description of the potion made from the brain, heart, and testicles of a young boy so that our arch-villain could cross over to the "other side" was downright insulting to me as a reader. Not because it was overly graphic or obscene, but because it was a cheap attempt to inspire enmity for a villain who, up to that point, was BORING! I'm sick and tired of the pathetic attempts of authors to shock their readers by adding a few graphic details to their meaningless plots.

    What these cheap tricks tell me is that Goodkind feels that his readers are unimaginative idiots incapable of coming up with even more psychologically thrilling conclusions than his testicle potion. You know why Hitchcock is still a household name? It's because he allowed his audience to fill in the gaps in his stories with their own twisted ideas.

    Perhaps the most disturbing thing about this book is the rave reviews its had by other readers. There is nothing interesting or remarkable about this book any more than there is about a McDonald's hamburger. I suppose millions of those get eaten every day too though. At least the hamburger only represents an investment of about five minutes though. I wish I had the hours back I wasted hoping that this book would take me somewhere. If you want a truly original story, check out some of my recommends. You should immediately be able to see the difference between a work of art and the unfortunate and needless death of another tree.

    15 out of 42 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2010

    This product was purchased in your teen section and my recommendation is for B&N to get it off its shelves, period.

    This product was purchased in your teen section, and I bought two of them-one for my grandson (14) and one for me. Having first read about 1/3 of it, I tore out chapters in both books and destroyed both new books without returning them to B&N, because some parts should not be read by anyone-adults included (the torturing of a child).

    14 out of 55 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 26, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Sword of Truth series

    I have read books 1-5 of this series by Terry Goodkind. all of the books have intriguing twists and plots and i keep reading the books. Over all out of the books of this series that i have read so far i think the first may be my favorite.

    11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 10, 2010

    Origin of "Legend of the Seeker"

    Let me begin by saying I'm not a professional critic. I loved this book as I loved the television series it spawned - "Legend of the Seeker". It's full of action, romance and is packed with lessons that the right thing to do is not always easy. If you are looking for a "feel good" book with a little fantasy action and romance you'll enjoy reading "Wizard's First Rule"

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 7, 2010

    This book is the best. That's the truth!

    Richard Cypher encounters a mysterious girl, Kahlan, being attacked. After defeating them, she tells Richard that she is from across the boundary: a magical block that is meant to separate their lands. Kahlan has an important task-- to find the wizard so he will name a Seeker. She talks of an evil man, Darken Rahl, who wants to rule the world and the Seeker must stop him. After finding the wizard, Richard is proclaimed Seeker. He must find a way through the boundary, travel through foreign lands, and all before the first day of winter. Terry Goodkind makes his characters come to life and adds enough plot twists to keep any reader interested. He gets his message across by using flaws in his characters, making them easy to relate to. He also uses the antagonists as counter-examples to his themes which can be gruesome at times. Near the middle of the book it seems like the author goes off on random tangents that do not seem to fit in the book until near the end. Major themes in the book include power and truth. Darken Rahl seeks power over all the lands, but Kahlan and Richard do not want him to have power. They seek power to prevent him from getting power by getting people to trust them. Rahl does the same, except he lies to the people to get them to follow him. This leads to the next theme, truth. The Seeker seeks the truth. He finds the truth by all means necessary. A main part of the book is the wizard's first rule which can be summed up as people will believe almost anything. It is truly a clever book and a great book for anyone that is interested in reading about adventure, romance, or fantasy.

    7 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 16, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Magnificent...An Enchanting, and Magical Epic, The Sword of Truth.!!!

    "You may pass, boy. Our business is with the girl" The man's voice was deep, almost friendly. Nonetheless, the threat was as sharp as a blade.
    "keep between them, don't let them all come at me at once," She whispered, "And be sure you aren't touching me when they come"
    They charged in a frightening rush, the one with the short sword swung it high, coming at Richard, He could hear one of the men behind him grab the woman as the man with sword raced toward him.
    And then, just before the man reached him, there was a hard impact to the air,
    like a clap of thunder with no sound. The violence of it made every joint in his body cry out in sharp pain.
    Dust lifted around them, spreading outward in a ring.

    Terry Goodkind's "Wizard's First Rule" is Magnificent!!!
    In the first installment of the sword of thruth series, Goodkind takes readers into a magical tour through the Eyes of Richard Cypher And Khalan Amnel. A magical journey to the Westlands, Midlands and concluding in the Garden of Life at the People's Palace. D'HARA.
    In the aftermath of the brutal murder of his father, a mysterious woman, has crossed the boundary through the westlands seeking help, in search for the old wizard of the first order, "Zeddicus Zu'l Zorander" to stop the evil Darken Rahl.

    In a world surrounded by prophesies, legends, mystical beasts, wizards, witches, kings, queens, Mord-Siths, spirits, and the power of magic for those trying to dominate the world.

    Goodkind's "Wizard's first rule", has set the foundation for one the most beloved sci-fi stories of today. He touches on the most darkest subjects of human kind, very or too graphic at times, but neccessary. Describing a world not too far different from ours. But at the same time, he also gives readers one of the most unforgettable love story in any book franchise.

    In a race against time, The seeker, the mother confessor, the wizard of first order with the help of the sword of truth will fight " an ancient and danguerous magic of immense power. a magic spawned from the earth, from life itself. A magic held in three vessels called the three boxes of Orden" A power that will give Darken Rahl total dominance of the world.

    "Wizard's First Rule" is a well written epic, slow paced, but a page turner. With many twists and turns througout the entire book. Goodking has a magic touch in developing the main characters. Richard and Khalan's love for each other is genuine and magical, Goodking doesn't take or give their love for granted. He also does a wonderful job with all the characters in the novel, describing the cruelty and nobility in all, making them unforgettable.
    The author doesn't miss a chapter to remind readers, they are witnessing the beggining of a legend, the book is all about the "True Seeker, a person who answers to no one but himself, the sword of truth is his to wield as he wishes, to seek answers to help others, not just himself. The purpose of the seeker is to be free to quest on his own, find answers to what he wants to know, and if need be, do whatever it is the answers demand"
    As stated before, "Wizard's First Rule" is enchanting and magical. Goodkind has all the characters needed, the book is beautifully written, and Khalan and Richard's story is exceptional.
    For those fans of the Show "Legend Of The Seeker", the book has many great surprises, and doesn't add or diminish the show. In addition, the writing of the books makes the story of "The True Seeker" meaningful.

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    Not for young teens...

    Perhaps when you read some of reviews for this book you may be lulled into thinking, "What a great jumping-off-point this might be after my teenager finishes reading (for example) the "Inheritence Series" written by Christopher Paolini." I felt like this myself when I bought this book. I let the combination of the cover-art, the title and the reviews convince me that I was making a good choice in purchasing "Wizards First Rule" (it was a surprise gift) but after learning how this book is written I can see that I was wrong.

    Let me put it this way: If I had a friend who wanted to buy this book for their young teenager (my son is 13) I would caution him or her to keep their childs emotional age in mind before delving into Terry's eleven-book-series. Even though my son is pretty mature for his age, and even though I cannot deny that Mr. Goodkind is a brilliant writer by giving his readers plenty of magical creatures and wizards to read about, this doesn't mean that the same morals that were found in any of J.K. Rowling or Christopher Paolini books will be found in Terry's books as well. Far, far from it.

    So, although as an adult I may admire Terry's work, as a parent, I cannot have my young son read something so blatently and unapologetically violent. Wizards First Rule is a story which is filled with bloody-gore, murder, decapitation and "other" disturbing situations of...shall I say, personal invasion....that may leave you feeling that you gave your young teenager a "too much, too soon" scenario for him or her to be exposed to.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 3, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Wizard's First Rule = "Writers are not Created Equal"

    A friend recommended this book to me as fun, easy read that told a story of a great hero who gets to be the ultimate good guy until the very end.

    I agree with this book being an easy read. It didn't take anytime at all to plow through this 800+ page paperback. It's not pretentious in the slightest, not complicated to follow and is easy to put down and pick back up.

    From the beginning, I didn't have much buy-in for the main characters due to the unrealistic emotional connections made almost instantaneously.

    I'm a big fan of getting lost in a book of complete fantasy or other outrageous fiction, but this book just didn't leave me wanting more. It's the first in a long series, but I have no interest in reading more.

    If you're looking for a great creator of fantasy, please check out Dan Simmons. He's an amazing writer.

    Hope this was helpful.

    6 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 5, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Goodkind Rocks with Wizard's First Rule

    Outstanding writing and continuing plot.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Nook Please!

    Please make this available for the nook. You'll make a lonely woman with too much time on her hands very happy.

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great epic fantasy!

    This book, though an older title, is one of the best fantasy books that I have read. With 848 pages of thrilling adventure, who could resist? It has everything that any fantasy reader could ask for: dragons, wizards, sword fighting, magic creatures, even an evil overlord. Seriously folks, this one you shouldn't pass up!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    EPIC!!!

    Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth series is a one of a kind masterpiece. The characters are realistic. The development of the characters is amazing; the story plot is intriguing, mystifying, and on a wide scale. The writing style is fast-paced and there is never too long of a dull moment. Once it gets your attention, the action doesn't stop. If you are out of books to read and looking for a good series, this is it. If you never read a book and is thinking of checking one out, start here.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Wizards First Rule

    I accidentally found Terry Goodkinds, Wizards First Rule about 3 weeks ago, and am now listening to Blood of the Fold, which is the third book in a series of Ten. I absolutely love this series, and it seems just as if you are attending a play, while listening to it. Wizards First Rule is about Richard, a woodsman, who spots a woman in white, who is being stalked by four men. Richard runs to warn Kahlann, who is the Mother Confessor and is the first man, who has ever treated her as an ordinary woman, which she is NOT!! Richard is also not an ordinary man, but he doesnt know it in the first part of the book.

    Wizards First Rule, introduces us to Richard, Kahlann, Zedd the WIzard, Darken Rahl (who has many secrets), the dragon and the mud people. The book describes the growing relationship between Richard and Kahlann,how they come to love and respect one another, and the many trials and tribulations they encounter. I was absolutely intrigued by the first three books but Wizards First Rule is my favorite, so far. If you are looking for a book you can sink your teeth into, you will love this one.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 24, 2009

    Awesome!

    I could not put it down. It gripped me from the get go and did not release its hold. It still hasn't. I bought the second and third book and will be getting the rest of the series. The characters are real and the author pulls no punches as he raises the stakes, keeping me riveted page after page. Do get this book and its sequels. You will not be disappointed.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2000

    I am embarrassed that I read the 2nd one, too

    Summing it up - simplistic characters that are stereotypes (the old fuddy-duddy wizard is so classically from D&D campaigns), a few interesting monsters, prophecies that feel pretty lame instead of feeling epic, and a very, very weak love story that is vapid, like many romantic movies that claim to be about love, but are mostly just about physically attraction and sex.

    3 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 26, 2012

    Terry Goodkind is simply amazing. He is an artist. The character

    Terry Goodkind is simply amazing. He is an artist. The characters in his books are so human, so real. The depth of his writing is beautiful. There are messages to live by in these books.&quot; Focus on the solution and NOT the problem&quot;, &quot;Accept truth. Don't be a blind follower&quot; &quot;By rejecting truth one embraces death&quot;... They are highly philosophical. I can honestly say that I have come to appreciate life...to love life because of them. They opened my eyes to a whole different view of things. They have made me more confident in who I am. The power of oneself, once realized, can be one of the most powerful forces out there. &quot;My life is my own.&quot;

    That being said, I can see why they are so hit and miss. I believe, to truly appreciate Goodkind's power of writing, you must hold both literature and philosophy highly. Where they are a great story, a true EPIC FANTASY, they have a depth to them that isn't grasped by a lot of people... These are not books you pick op and skim through, or read fast. If you are that kind of reader, I wouldn't expect much out of this series. You will lose the beauty of it, the underlying genius. More often than not, I hear that these books are &quot;okay&quot;. My enthusiasm usually goes overboard at that point...&quot;I LOVE THESE BOOKS!&quot;

    I read some comments about the graphic nature of these books... Life is pretty graphic people. I don't believe in sheltering oneself from the truth. These novels are a little graphic, but for anyone that hasn't had a comfy life, or who realizes that what happens, happens to show you just how twisted certain characters are. It's supposed to set us on edge. Good writing has the capability of touching our deepest emotions. If a book doesn't make one feel, weather it's amazed or horrified. The writer has no talent. The fact that Goodkind knows how to touch ones emotions and isn't afraid of doing so, shows how talented he is as an author. Not many people have the guts to turn their nightmares into art, and if any of you have tried you know it isn't easy. I write poetry, among other things, and you HAVE to have tons of emotion in what you write if you want it to stick (especially in a poem, where you are given significantly less opportunity to do so) Writing things that scare us has a HUGE impact on readers. It doesn't make the writer evil or horrible (often times it scares us more, knowing it came from us) Just look at H.P. Lovecraft (only one example, but almost all thriller, suspense, science fiction, and horror writing is greatly influenced by his work.) If you can't handle it and aren't able to take it for what it is. Leave these books be.

    I highly recommend this series to anyone who doesn't just pick up books and read them, but LIVES the books AS they read them. For those who let what they read really sink in and not just regurgitate what they see to their brain...DON'T PASS THIS SERIES BY!! Mr. Goodkind has given us something beautiful, and I for one will treasure it always.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Wizard's First Rule by Terry Goodkind

    Dispite the rave reviews on the jacket cover, this author does not hold a candle to Tolkien, Rowling or any of the really good fantasy writers. I found this book to be depressing and did not appreciate some of the subject matter. Goodkind could not decide whether to make this a children's book or an adult book, went with adult about one third of the way through which is about where I decided it was rubish and started another book.

    2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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