Wnt/ -Catenin Signaling In Vertebrate Posterior Neural Development

Overview

The Wnt/Beta-catenin signaling pathway is a key regulator of cell fate specification, differentiation, and growth in multiple systems throughout the animal kingdom. In vertebrate posterior neural development, Wnt/Beta-catenin signaling controls this complex multistep process. It initially induces the posterior regions of the nervous system, including the mid-hindbrain border, hindbrain, spinal cord and neural crest, and then subsequently fine-tunes the pattern of each region and determines the different cell ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $36.88   
  • New (5) from $36.88   
  • Used (1) from $53.89   
Sending request ...

Overview

The Wnt/Beta-catenin signaling pathway is a key regulator of cell fate specification, differentiation, and growth in multiple systems throughout the animal kingdom. In vertebrate posterior neural development, Wnt/Beta-catenin signaling controls this complex multistep process. It initially induces the posterior regions of the nervous system, including the mid-hindbrain border, hindbrain, spinal cord and neural crest, and then subsequently fine-tunes the pattern of each region and determines the different cell fates within them. In this review, we explore the function of the Wnt/Beta-catenin pathway during the formation of these specific posterior neural regions. We have examined the important transcriptional targets of the Wnt/Beta-catenin pathway acting downstream to mediate its morphogenetic activity. Different regulatory networks are activated in different posterior neural regions, and these networks induce specific neural cell types in each region. Eludidating how each of these networks specify different cell fates is crucial for understanding the basic tenets of how Wnt morphogenetic activity induces the posterior nervous system during the earliest stages of vertebrate development.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: David F Lindsey, PhD (Walla Walla University)
Description: This book examines the role of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway and its downstream regulatory targets in the development of the posterior nervous system, which includes the hindbrain, spinal cord, and neural crest cells.
Purpose: The authors integrate current knowledge from several vertebrate model organisms concerning the role of Wnt in posterior neural development. This is an important contribution to a complex field.
Audience: This book will likely be most valuable to postgraduates entering this field of research. However, it could serve a focused graduate-level course or be helpful in providing supplemental information to the instructor of an advanced undergraduate course.
Features: Early in the book, the authors explore evidence that establishes Wnt as a caudalizing factor in neural development. After discussing the formation of the midbrain-hindbrain border, the book addresses hindbrain induction and spinal cord induction, and what might discriminate between these fates along the antero-posterior axis. Throughout the review, the authors expertly discuss the complex interactions between the Wnt, Fgf, and retinoic acid signaling pathways in patterning the posterior nervous system. The review provides a systematic and comprehensive summary of the evidence for the role of Wnt and downstream targets in several vertebrate model organisms. The gene regulatory network depicted in figure 5.1 and the model for hindbrain versus spinal cord specification in figure 7.1 are especially helpful in summarizing the current knowledge. Unfortunately, the key points of several chapters are difficult to identify. Nevertheless, the authors do a remarkably good job of exploring such a complex process.
Assessment: "In my view, the level (not too detailed) and organization of the experimental results reviewed in this book is ideal for advanced undergraduate or graduate students. Students may see the connection between experimental data and conclusions, as well as the challenge of connecting pieces of a complex regulatory mechanism, and of reconciling conflicting results while searching for conserved regulatory networks. Despite this, the book is unlikely to engage a wide range of students because the extensive volume of information - the overwhelming number of experiments - is often presented without sufficient context. The reading becomes very tedious when the key points do not stand out and many chapters suffer from the lack of a succinct summary. The student or anyone new to the field would likely benefit from a convenient list or table of abbreviations such as AC, MHB, and MO. These are sometimes, but not always defined at the beginning of a chapter, and can quickly escape memory. A table, such as table 11.1 near the beginning of the book, would provide a useful reference as one reads through the review and encounters the many players in this complex process. "
From The Critics
Reviewer: David F Lindsey, PhD(Walla Walla University)
Description: This book examines the role of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway and its downstream regulatory targets in the development of the posterior nervous system, which includes the hindbrain, spinal cord, and neural crest cells.
Purpose: The authors integrate current knowledge from several vertebrate model organisms concerning the role of Wnt in posterior neural development. This is an important contribution to a complex field.
Audience: This book will likely be most valuable to postgraduates entering this field of research. However, it could serve a focused graduate-level course or be helpful in providing supplemental information to the instructor of an advanced undergraduate course.
Features: Early in the book, the authors explore evidence that establishes Wnt as a caudalizing factor in neural development. After discussing the formation of the midbrain-hindbrain border, the book addresses hindbrain induction and spinal cord induction, and what might discriminate between these fates along the antero-posterior axis. Throughout the review, the authors expertly discuss the complex interactions between the Wnt, Fgf, and retinoic acid signaling pathways in patterning the posterior nervous system. The review provides a systematic and comprehensive summary of the evidence for the role of Wnt and downstream targets in several vertebrate model organisms. The gene regulatory network depicted in figure 5.1 and the model for hindbrain versus spinal cord specification in figure 7.1 are especially helpful in summarizing the current knowledge. Unfortunately, the key points of several chapters are difficult to identify. Nevertheless, the authors do a remarkably good job of exploring such a complex process.
Assessment: In my view, the level (not too detailed) and organization of the experimental results reviewed in this book is ideal for advanced undergraduate or graduate students. Students may see the connection between experimental data and conclusions, as well as the challenge of connecting pieces of a complex regulatory mechanism, and of reconciling conflicting results while searching for conserved regulatory networks. Despite this, the book is unlikely to engage a wide range of students because the extensive volume of information - the overwhelming number of experiments - is often presented without sufficient context. The reading becomes very tedious when the key points do not stand out and many chapters suffer from the lack of a succinct summary. The student or anyone new to the field would likely benefit from a convenient list or table of abbreviations such as AC, MHB, and MO. These are sometimes, but not always defined at the beginning of a chapter, and can quickly escape memory. A table, such as table 11.1 near the beginning of the book, would provide a useful reference as one reads through the review and encounters the many players in this complex process.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)