Woe is I Jr.: The Younger Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English in PlainEnglish

Woe is I Jr.: The Younger Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English in PlainEnglish

by Patricia T. O'Conner, Tom Stiglich
     
 

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Shrek? Earwax-flavored jelly beans? Poems about meatballs? Who on earth would use all these to explain the rules of grammar? Must be Patricia T. O'Conner!

Just like Woe Is I, her national bestseller for adults, the junior version uses conversational language and witty, entertaining examples to show how fun and easy it can be to use good English. It's a

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Overview

Shrek? Earwax-flavored jelly beans? Poems about meatballs? Who on earth would use all these to explain the rules of grammar? Must be Patricia T. O'Conner!

Just like Woe Is I, her national bestseller for adults, the junior version uses conversational language and witty, entertaining examples to show how fun and easy it can be to use good English. It's a humorous reference book you'll actually enjoy pulling off the shelf.

Like a humorous Strunk and White for 4th through 8th graders, this is destined to become a must-have for every English classroom and student.
 

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"In this entertaining treasure, O'Conner's blithe banter will attract young readers, and her irreverent delivery will retain them. . . . This fun resource will prove invaluable." —VOYA (starred review)

"O'Conner's examples, funny little verses, and rules [plus] Stiglich's expressive cartoons are guaranteed to snag the attention of the most ungrammatical little culprit." —The Chicago Sun-Times

"Handbooks that are as instructive as they are entertaining are few and far between, making this a first purchase for most libraries." —School Library Journal

Ann Hodgman
Woe Is I Jr. is basically a lighthearted grammar textbook, and the points are sound. O'Conner covers a lot of tricky areas ("Hanged" or "hung"? "I," "me," or "myself"?), and she doesn't shrink from the fact that a lot of grammar rules must simply be memorized because they have no inherent logic.
—The New York Times
Children's Book-of-the-Month Club
Get ready for a very funny and clever read about grammar that combines entertainment and learning in one!
Slow Reads
O'Conner's lack of jargon makes the book's grammar approachable and fresh.

VOYA - Cynthia Winfield
In this entertaining treasure, O'Conner's blithe banter will attract young adult readers, and her irreverent delivery will retain them. Her vocabulary is current-she claims that English is "supersized" from adopting bits from many other languages-and her humor displays literacy of young adult culture through jokes, puns-"metaphors be with you" and "plurals of wisdom"-and examples that employ characters such as Count Olaf, Wishbone, and Shrek. Her advice is sound and explained far more memorably than this middle school English teacher has ever managed. How to decide whether to use "I" or "me" when it is paired with another noun? Simple: Play hide-and-seek. Hide the other and then seek the "stand-in" (or pronoun). When not dispensing such practical advice, O'Conner provides interesting, visual examples: A verse about a traveling meatball illustrates how verbs (the "action figures" of language) work. Readers will enjoy her silly examples and poems, the seemingly irrelevant tangents off to which she dashes, and the joy that she takes in linguistic play. Lone readers moved to share the cartoons and humor will discover that they have become grammar teachers themselves. Every writing classroom needs multiple copies so that students can share and enjoy O'Conner's mirth while inadvertently soaking up her lessons. This fun resource will prove invaluable.
School Library Journal

Gr 4-8
O'Conner has produced a grammar guide for children using the witty, lighthearted style that made Woe Is I (Putnam, 1996) so popular. She covers pronouns, plurals, possessives, verb usage, subject-verb agreement, capitalization, and punctuation with jargon-free explanations and entertaining examples (Shrek, Count Olaf, Garfield, and Harry Potter all put in appearances). Additional chapters on commonly confused and misspelled words, clichés, and instant messaging and e-mails make this a well-rounded and useful guide to grammar in the 21st century. The scattered comic-strip-style illustrations neither add to nor detract from its value. Handbooks that are as instructive as they are entertaining are few and far between, making this a first purchase for most libraries.
—Amanda RaklovitsCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399243318
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
05/10/2007
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
592,186
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.75(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Patricia T. O'Conner, a former editor at the New York Times Book Review, has written for many magazines and newspapers. She is the author of two other books on language and writing, Words Fail Me: What Everyone Who Writes Should Know About Writing and You Send Me: Getting It Right When You Write Online.

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