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The Wolf and the Dove

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Overview

The Wolf

Noble Aislinn grieves as the Iron Wolf and his minions storm through her beloved Darkenwald. And she burns with malice for the handsome Norman savage who would enslave her. . .even as she aches to know the rapture of the conqueror's kiss

The Dove

For the first time ever, mighty Wulfgar has been vanquished--and by a bold and beautiful princess of Saxon blood. He must have the chaste, sensuous ...

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Overview

The Wolf

Noble Aislinn grieves as the Iron Wolf and his minions storm through her beloved Darkenwald. And she burns with malice for the handsome Norman savage who would enslave her. . .even as she aches to know the rapture of the conqueror's kiss

The Dove

For the first time ever, mighty Wulfgar has been vanquished--and by a bold and beautiful princess of Saxon blood. He must have the chaste, sensuous enchantress who is sworn to his destruction. And he will risk life itself to nurture with tender passion a glorious union born in the blistering heat of hatred and war.

A classic of love and conquest in the Dark Ages by "a publishing phenomenon" (The New York Times). Noble Aislinn grieves as Norman conquerors storm through her beloved Darkenwald. She burns with malice for the savage Iron Wolf who would enslave her . . . even as she aches to know the rapture of the handsome conqueror's kiss.

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Editorial Reviews

Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“The queen of historical romance.”
New York Times
“A phenomenon.”
New York Times
“A phenomenon.”
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“The queen of historical romance.”
Library Journal

A Norman warrior and a Saxon princess battle their way to love in this violent medieval tale of war and hate, originally released in 1974.


—Kristin Ramsdell
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780380007783
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/28/2007
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 138,954
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 1.02 (d)

Meet the Author

Kathleen E. Woodiwiss

(1939 - 2007) Kathleen E. Woodiwiss, creator of the modern historical romance, died July 6, 2007 in Minnesota. She had just turned 68. Her attorney, William Messerlie, said that she died after a long illness.

Born on June 3, 1939 in Alexandria, Louisiana, Mrs. Woodiwiss was the youngest of eight siblings. She long relished creating original narratives, and by age six was telling herself stories at night to help herself fall asleep. At age 16, she met U.S. Air Force Second Lieutenant Ross Woodiwiss at a dance, and they married the following year. She wrote her first book in longhand while living at a military outpost in Japan.

Woodiwiss is credited with the invention of the modern historical romance novel: in 1972, she released The Flame and the Flower, an instant New York Times bestseller, creating literary precedent. The Flame and the Flower revolutionized mainstream publishing, featuring an epic historical romance with a strong heroine and impassioned sex scenes. "Kathleeen E. Woodiwiss is the founding mother of the historical romance genre," says Carrie Feron, vice president/editorial director of William Morrow and Avon Books, imprints of HarperCollins Publishers. Feron, who has been Woodiwiss's editor for 13 years, continues, "Avon Books is proud to have been Kathleen's sole publishing partner for her paperbacks and hardcover novels for more than three decades." Avon Books, a leader in the historical romance genre to this day, remains Mrs. Woodiwiss's original and only paperback publisher; William Morrow, Avon's sister company, publishes Mrs. Woodiwiss's hardcovers.

The Flame and the Flower was rejected by agents and hardcover publishers, who deemed it as "too long" at 600 pages. Rather than follow the advice of the rejection letters and rewrite the novel, Mrs. Woodiwiss instead submitted it to paperback publishers. The first publisher on her list, Avon, quickly purchased the novel and arranged an initial 500,000 print run. The novel sold over 2.3 million copies in its first four years of publication.

The success of this novel prompted a new style of writing romance, concentrating primarily on historical fiction tracking the monogamous relationship between a helpless heroines and the hero who rescued her, even if he had been the one to place her in danger. The romance novels which followed in her example featured longer plots, more controversial situations and characters, and more intimate and steamy sex scenes.

"Her words engendered an incredible passion among readers," notes Feron. Bestselling author Julia Quinn agrees, saying, "Woodiwiss made women want to read. She gave them an alternative to Westerns and hard-boiled police procedurals. When I was growing up, I saw my mother and grandmother reading and enjoying romances, and when I was old enough to read them myself, I felt as if I had been admitted into a special sisterhood of reading women."

New York Times bestselling author Susan Elizabeth Phillips, a leading voice in the women's fiction arena, says, "We all owe our careers to her. She opened the world of romance to us as readers. She created a career for us to go into."

The pioneering author has written 13 novels over the course of 35 years, all New York Times bestsellers. Kathleen E. Woodiwiss's final literary work, the upcoming Everlasing, will be published by William Morrow in October 2007. "Everlasting is Kathleen's final gift to her fans," notes Feron.

Kathleen E. Woodiwiss, who was predeceased by her husband and son Dorren, is survived by sons Sean and Heath, and numerous grandchildren.

Biography

Kathleen E. Woodiwiss always indulged her flair for the romantic. As a child, she devoured fairy tales. When she was just 16 years old, she met and fell in love with her future husband, 21-year-old Air Force Second Lieutenant Ross Woodiwiss, at a sock hop. They eloped a year later, and he often helped her work out the plots to her bestselling novels.

But fame and fortune didn't come as easily. On writing her first romance novel, Woodiwiss told People magazine, "It was something I was embarrassed to admit. Writing a novel seemed farfetched." Lucky for her readers, Woodiwiss persisted, with encouragement from friends and family. Even though her groundbreaking first novel, The Flame and the Flower, was ignored by eight publishers, it was eventually picked up by Avon Books and quickly became a bestseller.

The Flame and the Flower is credited with being the first historical romance novel, a subgenre that now accounts for a huge percentage of all paperback romances. Released in 1972, it opened a world of passionate fantasies and paved the way for subsequent romance writers to indulge in longer plots, historical fiction, controversial characters, and steamy scenes of sexual tension. According to bestselling romance novelist Julia Quinn, "Woodiwiss made women want to read. She gave them an alternative to Westerns and hard-boiled police procedurals. When I was growing up, I saw my mother and grandmother reading and enjoying romances, and when I was old enough to read them myself, I felt as if I had been admitted into a special sisterhood of reading women."

Despite her long career, Woodiwiss was not one of those book-a-year romance writers. In an interview with Germany's Bertelsmann Club, she attributed the long breaks between books to the intervention of real life: raising a family, marital problems, and medical issues. But through her ups and downs, she always focused on creating escapist, hopelessly romantic worlds for her readers. There is no "message," just the entertaining page-turners her fans know and love.

Good To Know

Taking inspiration from her favorite fairy tale, "Beauty and the Beast," Woodiwiss penned A Rose in Winter, the bestselling story of a fair maiden who is promised to a horribly disfigured, misunderstood recluse. There's a happy ending, of course.

Long before she was a bestselling novelist, Woodiwiss worked as a fashion model. Beauty and brains -- just like many of her strong-willed leading ladies.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Kathleen Erin Hogg (birth name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 3, 1939
    2. Place of Birth:
      Alexandria, Louisiana
    1. Date of Death:
      July 6, 2007
    2. Place of Death:
      Princeton, Minnesota

Read an Excerpt

The Wolf and the Dove

With The Wolf and the Dove the tension-filled excitement continues as two age-old enemies, a Norman and a Saxon, discover that love is an even more exhilarating emotion than hate. And as the tumultuous pair find their equally turbulent path to each other′s arms, passion and tenderness flares.

"For once, Wulfgar, my Norman knight," she breathed, her violet eyes glowing with the warmth. " ′Tis what the slave wills "

She danced away as his hands fell from her and curtsied prettily for him. Her eyes swept him from toe to head and knew his desires had not cooled.

"Mind your dress, lord. These days would chill even the stoutest of men."

Grabbing up a pelt she pulled it close about her and gave him an impishly wicked look. Turning on her heels with a low laugh, she went to the hearth, there to lay small logs upon the still-warm coals. She blew upon them but drew back in haste as the ashes flew up and sat back upon her heels rubbing her reddened eyes while Wulfgar′ s amused chuckles filled the room. She made a face at his mirth and swung the kettle of water on its hook over the building heat as he crossed to the warmth of the fire beside her and began to dress.

The water steamed and she went to where his sword and belt hung and there found his scabbard knife and returning with it, began to whet it on the stone of the fireplace. He raised his brow in wonder at her actions.

"My flesh is much more tender than yours, Wulfgar," she explained. "And if you would go about barefaced you should keep it so. The burr upon your chin does sorely chasten me and since I′ve seen this shaving done so well upon my people, I would think it not unseemly that you would allow me the single honour to return the favour."

Wulfgar glanced at her small dagger lying atop her gunna, remembering his thoughts of the day before. Was his death warranted now when he must go and fight her people? Should he tell her he was not one to waste lives needlessly? By Heavens, he would know the truth now. He nodded.

"Perhaps your hand is gentler than most, Aislinn,′ he replied. He took up a linen and dipped it into the kettle. Wringing it out, he shook the piece free to cool the steam and leaning back in a chair, laid it several folds across his face.

"Ah, Wulfgar, what a tempting pose you make,′ Aislinn quipped, considering him. "Would that it had been a moon ago that a Norman throat be laid bare before me--"

She rose and stood over him fingering the blade. Wulfgar removed the towel and their eyes met as he lifted a brow. Her mouth curved and she grinned devilishly, tossing her long hair with a shake of her head. Her tone became quite casual.

"Ah, but were I not so afraid of my next master the temptation might be far greater."

She slowly plied the well-honed blade along his cheeks until the same had lost their bristles and were again smooth. When she was done he rubbed a hand across his face, marvelling at the fact she had not cut him once.

"A better manservant a knight could never have." He reached be neath the pelt and pulled her down onto his lap. His gaze burned deeply into hers as he murmured hoarsely, "Remember that you are mine, Aislinn, and I will not share you."

"Do you treasure me after all, m′lord?" she murmured softly, tracing her finger lightly over the scar on his cheek.

He did not answer her inquiry but said, "Remember.′

It was with a definite hunger he pulled her against him and kissed her, this time tasting the warmth and passion he knew her capable of.

The Wolf and the Dove. Copyright © by Kathleen Woodiwiss. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 181 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(127)

4 Star

(24)

3 Star

(14)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(9)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 181 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2011

    This started it all!

    This was the first historical romance novel I read and I couldnt put it down! This book is why I started to read historical romance and I almost didnt read it because of reviews commenting about a rape scene which of course was common thing during that time period but something I didnt approve of. I started to read it and the rape scene that people were commenting about isnt what you think it is and people should read the whole book to see the plot play out because then they would know what really happened. All in all, this is one of my favorite historical romances and would recommend any Kathleen E. Woodiwiss books.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2009

    All Time Favorite

    I was never really one to read and many years ago, a friend told me to read this book. I did and absolutely fell in love with this book and Katherine Woodwiss. I've read all of her books and this particular one and The Flame and The Flower are my favorite books ever. If it wasn't for this book, I probably wouldn't be reading anything more than a magazine! Thanks Katherine!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 30, 2011

    wonderful

    this is the first book I've read by this author and I thought it was a wonderful book. Can't wait to start another.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 23, 2010

    More than 15 years later...

    I had to reread it to see if I'd enjoy it as much now as I did then. I did, maybe even more. It has all of the historical details, full cast, conflicted emotions, sweeping romance and twisting plot any reader of this genre could possibly ask for. Yes, the heroine is "too" perfect and yes there is (very) dubious consent. If these issues for you, pass this one up. Myself, I know the difference between fantasy and reality and what I'm looking for in a romance. These characters and their stories are larger than life, as they should be. Thank you Kathleen and may you R.I.P.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2014

    In 1975 I started my first Kathleen Woodwiss book and couldn't p

    In 1975 I started my first Kathleen Woodwiss book and couldn't put it down.  I found myself visiting the bookstore regularly waiting for her next book
    Now almost forty years later I am purchasing all of them for my nook.  I have the hardcopies in storage still.  All of her books are definitely written to be read over and over again through the years.
    I highly recommend this author and she is missed dearly by this fan.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 22, 2013

    Loved it again after 30+ years I read so many K.W. books i

    Loved it again after 30+ years
    I read so many K.W. books in the 70's and decided to re-read since I got my eReader. This one took place in the 11th century so you received an understanding of life in those times. I loved the growing love story and the spirit and devotion of Aislinn as a strong willed woman. So glad I read this again, along with Shanna,A Rose in Winter, Ashes in the Wind, The Flame and the Flower. I loved them all.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 1, 2011

    Excellent!

    I read this in high school and about halfway through my mom confiscated it! A few weeks later she returned it and let me finish it...saying she loved it! We have many catch phrases and jokes from the book and of all the 100s of romance books ive read, this is one i can honestly say i always remember the title and plot/characters.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2007

    WAY too much rape

    The concept of the book, conquerer and his victim falling in love was this books saving grace. The fact that he raped her uncountable times before he even felt a hint of affection for her strongly outweights any redeeming qualities the book might have.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2005

    Rape your way to a woman's heart

    If you believe rape and brutalization are the way to a woman's heart, this book is for you. Rape, rape, and more rape. Just the thing to make a woman fall in love with you. And of course, it's such a pleasant experience that she DOES fall for her rapist. Beyond that, the catty sniping between Aislann and Gwyneth is disgusting. If I had to listen to that nonsense all the time, I'd hate women, too.

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2004

    Woodiwiss' Best Hands Down!

    I've read The Wolf and The Dove four times and each time I love it more and more. It is a timeless tale of the 1066 Norman conquest of England. Woodiwiss is a true to history and gives a realistic account of what life and death was like for the people of that time as the small fief of Darkenwald is laid to waste by the invading army and claimed in the name of the Duke of Normandy. The writing is wonderful, the characters well rounded. The stories of Aislinn and Wulfgar are believable. This is not your typical knight in shining armor story. I found myself drawn into there world...I laughed, I cried and in the end...well, you will just have to read this great book for yourself to find out. I HIGHLY recommend it. I promise you wont be sorry.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2003

    Pretty Good

    This book certainly seemed more accurate than most historical romance novels with all of the men really not considering women anything more than property. Ms. Woodiwiss also used dialogue more expected from that era rather than the 20th century speech so many writers use in period stories. Aislinn and Wulfgar were great characters and their love story was very good. However, this book was in major need of editing. Easily, a hundred pages could have been done away with because they were filled with unimportant detail. The ending was also so silly. Wulfgar finds out he really isn't illegitimate and Aislinn finds out she really was a virgin when Wulfgar first raped her.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2011

    love this book.

    when i was a kid i hated to read,,bedridden, my sister gave me this book to read... i was hooked and this is still my fav book..after 30 years i still love to read it and i hope it enspires more people to love books the way it did me..u

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 15, 2011

    Wonderful lovestory!

    I read this book about a year after it first came out. I have since read it over and over again. I think it is the best book on romance and the best one of her books. She is a great author but this book--it really sets the romantic mode. I wish there were more pictures of the characters especially Aislinn and Wulfgar. I wouldn't mind seeing what Ragnor and his cousin looked like too. I have envisioned them for so long, I can almost see their charactoers. It is worth the reading.
    Babbsie

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 24, 2011

    start with a rape

    so the first chapter is the rape of the heroine (along with several other atrocites). well, that's as far as i'll read. and the writing is terrible. how woodiwiss has published so many books i have no idea as they all suck.

    1 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 5, 2011

    phenominal!!!

    I read this in high school and have read it about 15 times since! My favorite romance novel!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 25, 2010

    Loved then and still love it now

    I read this when I was a teenager and romance was big, I read it again, and will still read it again. Pure, hot romance ! Takes you back in time !

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 17, 2010

    Loved it!

    One of my HEA books now..... a keeper

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Always A Fan

    I love Kathleen Woodisiss' historical romances, I've read almost all of her books, but had been putting this one to the side for a while, unsure if it would capture my attention as her others have. I must say that as always her characters and storyline completely enraptured me.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2010

    So Romantic!

    This is one of the most wonderful books I have ever read! I am going to continue reading all of Kathleen E. Woodiwiss's books. I read this over a year ago and still catch myself thinking about it. I was in love with Wulfgar, and Aislinn is the kind of heroine I would want to be. I was only in the 9th grade when my Mimi got me to read The Flame and The Flower and I couldn't put it down. She read it when it had first came out so I don't think she knew what she had me reading, but there is no stopping me now.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Best book ever

    I love this book I have re-read this book so many times. I love Wulfgar his character is strong and forceful and yet he's kind and Ainslin is another strong female character that holds her own against Wulfgar and the other Norman invaders and she doesn't feel sorry for herself and I like how she takes charge of the situation they are in. I don't agree with other reviews that they say there is too much rape references in this book, Ainslin doesn't get raped by Wulfgar or Ragnor and when Wulfgar makes love to Ainslin it was the point when she realised she loved him and she doesn't want to give herself willingly until he gives into love and commits to her and I love that about her. This book is one of the best book KW has written.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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