The Wolf and the Seven Little Kids

( 1 )

Overview

When a mother goat leaves her seven kids at home, a hungry wolf disguises himself as their returning mother and gobbles whole all but the youngest kid. But the mother goat thinks up an ingenious way to save all of her children and punish the wolf — by sewing rocks into his stomach!

When six of her seven kids are swallowed by a wicked wolf, Old Mother Goat devises a way to rescue them.

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Overview

When a mother goat leaves her seven kids at home, a hungry wolf disguises himself as their returning mother and gobbles whole all but the youngest kid. But the mother goat thinks up an ingenious way to save all of her children and punish the wolf — by sewing rocks into his stomach!

When six of her seven kids are swallowed by a wicked wolf, Old Mother Goat devises a way to rescue them.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Watts complements a classic folktale with a quaint, warmly detailed country setting and cast of bipedal animals. Ages 5-8. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Judy Katsh
This is a satisfying illustrated version of an old tale from a publisher known for its high quality treatment of folk and fairy tales. It's the familiar story of the wolf who successfully outwits 7 young goat children who, though hip to the wolf's tricks, are just young and naive enough to be ultimately outsmarted. The illustrations embrace the text with gentle colors and fanciful perspectives. The folksiness of the full color drawings both involve the young readers in the action and reassure them that every thing will turn out all right in the end. 1999 (orig.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3A newly illustrated version of the folktale in which a mother goat warns her youngsters not to let anyone in while she is away, only to find that they have been duped by a wicked wolf and that six of them have been eaten. This straightforward version is complemented by quaint, colorful illustrations with just the right Old World charm. The oversized pages have many endearing details for little eyes to pore over. Older readers may enjoy the more humorous illustrations in Eric Kimmel's Nanny Goat and the Seven Little Kids (Holiday, 1990), but this is an adequate addition.Lisa S. Murphy, formerly at Dauphin County Library System, Harrisburg, PA
Ilene Cooper
This tale hasn't gotten nearly as much picture-book coverage as some of the Grimms' more popular works; perhaps because it's hard to depict that nasty scene in which the mother goat cuts the wolf open, lets out her kids, and sews stones in the wolf's stomach. Watts manages it here with a certain amount of decorum--the double-page spread shows the kids running free and the wolf already sewn up. Libraries needing a version of the story will find this one perfectly adequate. The text is straightforward, and the oversize pictures have a folksy quality that seems just right.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789207357
  • Publisher: Abbeville Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/28/2001
  • Series: Little Pebbles Series
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 29
  • Sales rank: 533,687
  • Age range: 6 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.75 (w) x 7.86 (h) x 0.32 (d)

Meet the Author

After studying at Marburg, Jacob became a clerk in the War Office at Kassel, and in 1808 librarian to Jerome Bonaparte, King of Westphalia. In 1841 he received Professorship at Berlin, and in 1854 began work on Deutsches Worterbuch with his brother.

Bernadette Watts has loved to draw since her childhood in England. She created her first picture book under the influence of Beatrix Potter. Watts studied at the Maidstone Art School in Kent and is the illustrator of North South fairy tales The Snow Queen and The Ugly Duckling.

Anthea Bell (translator) is the recipient of the Schlegel Tieck Prize for translation from German, the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, and the Helen and Kurt Wolff Prize in 2002 for the translation of W. G. Sebald's "Austerlitz", and the 2003 Austrian State Prize for Literary Translation. She lives in Cambridge, England.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 15, 2011

    Wonderful illustrations

    I love this story, I guess because I was brought up with it in Russia. Illustrations in this book are absolutely delightful, though a bit scary at times - the moment when mother goat saws up the wolf's stomach is a bit too detailed to my taste, but overall, it is a great presentation of the old tale. My kids adored it, though it did brought up tears in my 5 year old son for the bad wolf's fate. I believe it represents very truthfully Grimm's fairy tales spirit.

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