Wolf Mark

Wolf Mark

4.0 3
by Joseph Bruchac
     
 

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Luke King knows a lot of things. Like four different ways to disarm an enemy before the attacker can take a breath. Like every detail of every book he’s ever read. And Luke knows enough—just enough—about what his father does as a black ops infiltrator to know which questions not to ask.
Luke hopes that this time, he’ll finally have a…  See more details below

Overview

Luke King knows a lot of things. Like four different ways to disarm an enemy before the attacker can take a breath. Like every detail of every book he’s ever read. And Luke knows enough—just enough—about what his father does as a black ops infiltrator to know which questions not to ask.
Luke hopes that this time, he’ll finally have a normal life. He’ll be able to ask out the girl he likes. He’ll hang out with his friends. He’ll be invisible—just as he wants.
But when his dad goes missing, Luke realizes that life will always be different for him. Suddenly he must avoid his father’s kidnappers, while at the same time evading the attention of a mysterious clique of Russian hipsters, who seem much too interested in Luke’s own personal secret. Faced with multiple challenges and his emerging paranormal identity, Luke must decide who to trust as he creates his own destiny.

Editorial Reviews

Publisher's Weekly
Bruchac (Dragon Castle) delivers a fun twist on werewolf stories mixed with some mad science and espionage. . . . Bruchac adeptly incorporates characters of various heritages: Luke is Native American; his best friend/crush, Meena, is Pakistani; and the Sunglass Mafia—a group of students who are more than they seem—are from eastern Russia. Luke also possesses a hefty amount of cultural and political awareness to go with his combat and espionage expertise, which serve him well.
Kirkus Reviews
A loner teen finds himself caught up in a paranormal paramilitary threat—but he has both untapped personal resources and some unlikely allies to help him out.

. . . .

A solid entry into the paranormal market, with an appealingly different hero.
Booklist Magazine
Drawing on Native American traditions and his own lively imagination, Bruchac has written a genre-blending novel that combines horror, science fiction, and adventure into a satisfying whole. The fast pace will hold readers’ attention to the end, which—yes—leaves the door open to the possibility of a sequel.
School Library Journal
Bruchac has created a tense, readable novel. He combines Native American lore, supernatural elements, genetic engineering, romance, geopolitics, and adventure in one story. At times this ambitious mixture stretches credulity, and in the hands of a lesser storyteller the novel would simply fall apart, but the mystery and edge-of-your-seat action are enough to keep readers hooked.
Publishers Weekly
Bruchac (Dragon Castle) delivers a fun twist on werewolf stories mixed with some mad science and espionage. Luke King’s black ops father spent years teaching him various survival skills, and Luke’s heightened senses also come in handy. When Luke’s father is kidnapped, Luke discovers that these powers are only the tip of the iceberg. As he investigates his father’s disappearance, Luke learns more about his real heritage as a beast and about the mysterious goings-on at the Maxico corporation, which has set up shop in town. Bruchac adeptly incorporates characters of various heritages: Luke is Native American; his best friend/crush, Meena, is Pakistani; and the Sunglass Mafia—a group of students who are more than they seem—are from eastern Russia. Luke also possesses a hefty amount of cultural and political awareness to go with his combat and espionage expertise, which serve him well (and make him a bit too perfect). There are some minor shortcuts—notably Luke’s inconsistent tendency to disrupt some electrical objects, but not others—but the action and Luke’s narration carry the book nicely. Ages 12–up. (Sept.)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013255883
Publisher:
Lee & Low Books, Inc.
Publication date:
09/21/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
392
File size:
3 MB
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

JOSEPH BRUCHAC is an award-winning storyteller, poet, and author of more than one hundred twenty books for adults and young readers. His work, which often draws on his Abenaki ancestry, has won numerous awards, including ALA Best Books for Young Adults, Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor, National Wildlife Federation Award, and multiple state association awards. He and his two grown sons work extensively on the preservation of Abenaki culture, language, and traditional Native outdoor skills. Bruchac has also taught martial arts for more than thirty years, focusing in particular on the martial art of Indonesia, Pentjak Silat, in which he holds the rank of Master.

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Wolf Mark 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
iheartyabooks More than 1 year ago
Wolf Mark is an awesome book. Joseph Bruchac takes you into the mind of Luke, and I do mean literally takes you in the mind of Luke. This story is told from Luke's POV, but you're seeing it all through Luke's perspective, the way his dad has trained him to see the situation. Wolf Mark is total testosterone. Definitely an all guy's storyline. Bruchac does put just a splash of romance in with Luke's feelings for Meena. Luke just wants to be brave enough to ask Meena to take a ride on his motorcycle, his second love, the Norton Commando. Luke thought he could finally have a normal boys, teenage life, but all that changes for Luke when his father gets kidnapped by Maxico. Then Luke finds himself teaming up with the Sunglass Mafia, as Luke calls them. They are a gang of seven Russians that goes to school with him at RHS. These Russian teenagers have a little secret of their own, and talk about the unlikeliest gang of teenagers that Luke could team up with to help him rescue his dad while being a werewolf skinwalker. Well . . . this would be the group. This is where I really started to enjoy Luke's character and the storyline. Before this, it's mainly Luke's thoughts you're reading, and I do have to say, I like more interacting with characters and hearing their voice in books. And boy does it pick up here with the Russian's vampires. I love Luke's relationship with the Russian's vampires, especially three of them: Yuri, Vlad and the tough, sexy Marina, who definitely has the hots for wolfboy Luke. But Luke's heart belongs to Meena, pining for his daydream date with Meena on the back of his motorcycle. Wolf Mark is a Fantastic novel full of action, an awesome storyline, and teenage boys' first love. I fell in love Luke and definitely got my testosterone fix in this novel. I recommend Wolf Mark as a must read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its really a good book, its just missing that speacial spark of life that lets you truly live the characters-something needed. I loked it but lost interest halfway hrough and never finished, i could guess the ending. Still might be worh trying. An just a little insight, thi is written be a proffetional writer, of some books you might well have read.
Icecream18 More than 1 year ago
Luke, the main character, will draw the reader into this novel. His life has been secretive up to this point, he has to deal with the knowledge that his father is a black ops infiltrator and that he has a strange wolf mark on his wrist. He has always tried to blend in, but his attempts are not always successful-especially when his father mysteriously disappears, leaving Luke a target. The action really takes off here as Luke decides that the Russian crowd should be viewed in shades of grey, rather than black or white, and how he should approach the subject of his wolf mark and his fathers disappearance. Luke is a great main character. He has plenty of knowledge about black ops, as does his father, that really adds to the book. He is a bit of an enigma in the beginning, forcing the reader to look deeper. At times, he can be impulsive, though he appears cautious by nature. The reader will enjoy following his thoughts and actions through the book. The secondary characters are just as intriguing, the reader will get to meet quite a few "characters." The events are fast-paced, some high-energy. The plot was intriguing, could have been developed a little further. The story itself was good enough to hold this readers attention. This book is good for young readers through teens.