Wolfkiller: Wisdom from Nineteenth-Century Navajo Shephered
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Wolfkiller: Wisdom from Nineteenth-Century Navajo Shephered

by Harvey Leake
     
 

Fascinating history and compelling storytelling make Wolfkiller, the memoir of a Navajo shepherd man who lived in the Monument Valley region of the Southwest, a page-turning epic. In these stories compiled by Harvey Leake, Wolfkiller shares the ancient wisdom of the Navajo elders that was passed to him while a boy growing up near the Utah/Arizona border. Wolfkiller

Overview

Fascinating history and compelling storytelling make Wolfkiller, the memoir of a Navajo shepherd man who lived in the Monument Valley region of the Southwest, a page-turning epic. In these stories compiled by Harvey Leake, Wolfkiller shares the ancient wisdom of the Navajo elders that was passed to him while a boy growing up near the Utah/Arizona border. Wolfkiller's story was recorded and translated by pioneer trader Louisa Wade Wetherill, an unlikely pairing that came together when she moved to this remote area of southern Utah in 1906. Wetherill recognized that Wolfkiller was a man of exceptional character, with lessons and wisdom of the Navajo that deserved to be recorded and preserved for the benefit of future generations.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423600305
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
02/13/2007
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
1,184,738
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.54(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

Read an Excerpt

I first met Wolfkiller in 1906 at Olj ato (Moonlight Water), in southeastern Utah. O lj ato, at that time, was one of the most remote places in the count r y. The nearest town was seve nty miles away, access to the area was difficult , and few outsiders ventured that way. The Navajos and P iutes who lived there still kept to their old customs, little affected by white society. None of them spoke English.

The residents of the Oljato region lived in hogans , which are conicalshaped houses made of poles covered with bark and mu d . The doorways face the sunrise, and a blanket is used as a door to keep out the blowing sand and cold. The only other opening is a smoke hole at the apex of the roof . Around the heart h , the packe d - dirt floor is carpeted with sheepskins and robes, making for a pleasant and cozy place to gather on cold evenings.

Meet the Author

Harvey Leake began tracing the trail of his great-grandparents, Louisa and John Wetherill, more than twenty-five years ago in libraries, archives, and family papers, and by listening to the recollections of the family elders. He assists in the interpretation of historical documents and photographs for the Wetherill archive at the Anasazi Heritage Center in Dolores, Colorado. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering from Arizona State University and a Master of Arts degree in theology from Fuller Theological Seminary.

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