Wolves in the Land of Salmon

Wolves in the Land of Salmon

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by David Moskowitz
     
 

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Wolves. We love them, idolize them, and are fascinated by them. We also hate them, fear them, and blame them. The wolf's relationship with humans is complex and can be emotionally wrought, depending on whether one is a hunter, rancher, or animal lover.

Wolves in the Land of Salmon is nature writing at its best. Vivid imagery and a sense of

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Overview

Wolves. We love them, idolize them, and are fascinated by them. We also hate them, fear them, and blame them. The wolf's relationship with humans is complex and can be emotionally wrought, depending on whether one is a hunter, rancher, or animal lover.

Wolves in the Land of Salmon is nature writing at its best. Vivid imagery and a sense of wonder bring the text alive and help the reader understand exactly what it means to be a wolf. David Moskowitz's training as a wildlife tracker gives him insider knowledge he generously shares with the hope that with greater understanding comes new perspective.

The daring photography provides the first significant portrait of these charismatic animals west of the Cascades and the British Columbia Coast Range. His accounts of young wolves at play, and the stories that shed light on the psychological power wolves have across cultures and generations, make this a true wilderness adventure.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This wide-ranging survey about wolves of the Pacific Northwest offers something for both the specialist and the curious layperson. Wildlife tracker Moskowitz uses the tracker mindset in his examination of wolves and their interactions with humans and nature. Like tracking, with its series of educated guesses based on available information, Moskowitz weaves his observations with existing research to understand the present state of wolf populations. In the odd-numbered chapters he describes individual packs of wolves, while more general information is covered in the even-numbered chapters, such as wolf biology or diet and hunting. Moskowitz doesn’t offer advice, but instead seeks to evenhandedly discuss human perceptions of and interactions with wolves. This is particularly well done in the chapter “Shapeshifter: The Changing Relationship between Humans and Wolves,” co-written with Darcy Ottey, which contrasts human reactions to various “symbolic wolves” to the reality of the actual animals. Maps throughout orient the reader to the location of packs while beautiful photographs enliven the tale and line drawings illustrate key points. Residents of the Pacific Northwest will appreciate the specificity of this work, but any fans of wolves or wildlife biology will find this of interest. Photos. (Feb.)
National Geographic Traveler blog
"This wide-ranging survey about wolves of the Pacific Northwest offers something for both the specialist and the curious layperson…Residents of the Pacific Northwest will appreciate the specificity of this work, but any fans of wolves or wildlife biology will find this of interest."

Cascadia Weekly
"David Moskowitz follows these most controversial of animals through the wilds of the Cascade Range and up into British Columbia, richly evoking their habitat and complex nature.”

The Writer’s Shack
“An essential read for anyone wishing to gain a deeper understanding of how ecological, political, and geological trends can lead to the decline or restoration of species and their habitats."

From the Publisher
“An expert wildlife tracker paints a portrait of wolves’ lives and value to ecosystems, set against the backdrop of conflict over rising wolf populations.”

The Writer’s Shack - Riley Banks
“A great book for anyone even remotely interested in North America’s wolf populations.”

Science News
“A great book for anyone even remotely interested in North America’s wolf populations.”

Library Journal
Using vivid illustrations, maps, scientific research, and field observations, Moskowitz (Wildlife of the Pacific Northwest) describes his experiences tracking wolf populations throughout the Pacific Northwest. He outlines the evolutionary history, cultural significance, geographic dispersal, and hunting habits of wolves, and examines threats to wolf populations and future directions in wolf conservation. The results are a comprehensive overview of wolves and their interactions with humans and broader ecosystems. Unlike Thomas McNamee's The Return of the Wolf to Yellowstone, he documents several case studies, rather than focusing on one. As a result, readers can observe patterns in wolf restoration initiatives. VERDICT Moskowitz's examination of how human behaviors have impacted wolf populations will be of interest to wildlife conservationists, while his exploration of the physiology, habits, migrations, and lore of wolves of all kinds makes this book an important resource for any wolf enthusiast. The in-depth descriptions of national parks and landmarks in the mountainous Pacific Northwest will appeal to nature readers. This is an essential read for anyone wishing to gain a deeper understanding of how ecological, political, and geological trends can lead to the decline or restoration of species and their habitats.—Ryan Nayler, Native Counseling Svcs. of Alberta, Edmonton

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781604694901
Publisher:
Timber Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
04/15/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
996,344
File size:
42 MB
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