The Woman-Hater

Overview

Charles Reade (1814-1884) was an English novelist and dramatist. He began his literary career as a dramatist, and it was his own wish that the word "dramatist" should stand-first in the description of his occupations on his tombstone. His first comedy, The Ladies' Battle, appeared in May 1851. It was followed by Angela (1851), A Village Tale (1852) and The Lost Husband (1852). But Reade's reputation was made by the twoact comedy, Masks and Faces (1852), in which he collaborated with Tom Taylor. He made his name ...
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Overview

Charles Reade (1814-1884) was an English novelist and dramatist. He began his literary career as a dramatist, and it was his own wish that the word "dramatist" should stand-first in the description of his occupations on his tombstone. His first comedy, The Ladies' Battle, appeared in May 1851. It was followed by Angela (1851), A Village Tale (1852) and The Lost Husband (1852). But Reade's reputation was made by the twoact comedy, Masks and Faces (1852), in which he collaborated with Tom Taylor. He made his name as a novelist in 1856, when he produced It is Never Too Late to Mend, a novel written with the purpose of reforming abuses in prison discipline and the treatment of criminals. Several novels followed in quick succession, including The Course of True Love Never Did Run Smooth (1857), Jack of All Trades (1858), Love Me Little, Love Me Long (1859), and White Lies (1860), which was dramatised as The Double Marriage. In 1861, Reade produced what would become his most famous work, The Cloister and the Hearth, relating the adventures of the father of Erasmus.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781490933375
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 7/7/2013
  • Pages: 376
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.84 (d)

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" I'm in your hands," said she, and smiled languidly, to please him. But by-and-by he looked at her, and found she was taking a little cry all to herself. " Dear me !" said he ; " what is the matter ? " " My friend, forgive me. He was not there to share my triumph." CHAPTER IV. As the opera drew to an end, Zoe began to look round more and more for Severne ; but he did not come, and Lord Uxmoor offered his arm earnestly. She took it; but hung back a moment on his very arm, to tell Harrington Mr. Severne had been taken ill. At the railway station the truant emerged suddenly, just as the train was leaving; but Lord Uxmoor had secured three seats, and the defaulter had to go with Harrington. On reaching the hotel, the ladies took their bed-candles; but Uxmoor found time to propose an excursion next da Sunday, to a lovely little lakeā€”open carriage, four horses. The young ladies accepted, but Mr. Severne declined ; he thanked Lord Uxmoor politely, but he had arrears of correspondence. Zoe cast a mortified, and rather a haughty glance on him ; and Fanny shrugged her shoulders incredulously. These two ladies brushed hair together in Zoe's room. That is a soothing operation, my masters, and famous for stimulating females to friendly gossip; but this time there was, for once, a guarded reserve. Zoe was irritated, puzzled, mortified, and even grieved by Severne's conduct. Fanny was gnawed by jealousy, and out of temper. She had forgiven Zoe Ned Severne. But that young lady was insatiable ; Lord Uxmoor, too, had fallen openly in love with her; openly to a female eye. So then a blonde had no chance with a dark girl by ; thus reasoned she, and it was intolerable. It was some time beforeeither spoke an atom of what was uppermost in her mind. They each doled out a hund...
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